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  1. I have a dream to add one Naginata to my collection for a long time In the end, I succeeded and I think it's quite a nice piece So I share just for the pleasure of the eyes of nihonto fans Hizen Shodai Masahiro Mei: Hizen no Kuni Kawachi Daijō Fujiwara Masahiro Kanbun yonen nigatsu kichijitsu (February 1664) Nagasa: 40.8 cm
    29 points
  2. Darcy grew up in Windsor, Canada. He was one of 3 brothers. When younger, he worked in an automotive plant there. He would go onto McGill in Montreal to study Computer Science. He would start his own company and sell it to INTUIT during the Dot.com era. He bought a red Ferrari thereafter to impress the girls, but he rarely drove it. He preferred his dirtbikes, for which the local police gave him hell. He’d give them hell back. I’d visit him in Montreal. Generally, he was interested in the science of finely made things. Be it Scottish whisky, the chemical composition of rare gemstones, or nihonto, we would stay up late talking. When I went to Scotland, I’d bring him back some good stuff not available in the USA back then. He helped me design the wedding ring for my wife. We set it with a diamond he owned and I believe he was keeping for his own marriage. There was a pretty long haired brunette girl for him back then, but it didn’t work out. One of the many random memories I have is that he would do things like get a bunch of sleeping bags and give them to the homeless on the coldest nights in Montreal. We’d be friends for 20 years. We would meet up every few years and have a meal together, starting up again as if we had just seen each other last week. In recent years, life took us further apart- but I will miss the guy who could brutally argue statistics with me while we made hamburgers on a flame grill at 2 am. Curran
    29 points
  3. Darcy Brockbank: A Tribute “The captain of his soul” By Robert Hughes Ted Tenold, Darcy’s close friend and longtime business associate had the unenviable task of sharing this tragedy with our community. Thus, we began to mourn the loss of our nihonto associate and friend…. While at the same time, many condolences have registered Darcy’s great achievements and his educational legacy. This is the part that really deserves a life celebration for there is much that he generously shared! Just as one piece of a puzzle never represents the completed work, singular perceptions never define the magnitude of a person’s character. So, from the ever increasing list of heartfelt condolences following Ted’s notification, I have borrowed a few essential elements to quote here. I hope no one minds… By assembling a few shared thoughts, quite an amazing picture emerges. The condolences and reflections are like small pieces of tile, and when combined leave us with a large life mosaic. The mosaic records our sense of loss while recognizing the contributions he made to us. Darcy masterfully bundled three somewhat incongruous elements together: sword scholarship, friendship, and commercial activity. As many have attested, it truly was a blessing to be the beneficiary of even one, if not all three elements. Many important sword and fittings collections arose or were enhanced through either guidance or acquisitions from Darcy. With intelligence and a superb sense of refinement, Darcy had a great eye and appreciation for fine samurai art and beauty in life. With all his accomplishments, he was never vain. A trait he may have inherited from his recently deceased father who had been a well-respected teacher and school principal in Ontario. The apple never falls far from the tree… Mosaic Life Tiles “most respected and trusted scholar” John V. (Glencoe Il.) “inconceivable” Stephen (Iowa)he would do things like get a bunch of sleeping bags and give them to the homeless on the coldest nights in Montreal” Curran (Pirate Coves, USA)“nihonto legend… I’m crushed.” “He didn’t tolerate unethical dealings and fraud.” Brian (South Africa) “no words adequate to express this terrible loss” Ray (Florida) “amazing wealth of knowledge” Greg F (Australia) “a living legend has gone” Chris (Bavaria) "a devasting loss” Jussi (Finland)“ “a leader in the nihonto community” Mark S. (Illinois) “his reach was far, his knowledge was great, his friendship will be missed” B. Hennick (Canada) “he shared his time and knowledge which was more precious” Matt (Virginia) “very passionate guy searching for the truth” Robert (New York) “my mind is in turmoil” Jean L. (France) “and the sleepless nights he spent answering even the most ridiculous of emails and random enquiries in his honest, lengthy, didactic manner. Trying to teach, elucidate, steer. Often taking other people’s burdens upon himself.” Michael S. (UK) And so on…. the mosaic is taking shape….. Those that followed Darcy’s recent adventures know that during the onset of the pandemic, he relocated to Japan from Thailand. Little by little, flight opportunities diminished and Darcy found himself a temporary but long term resident in Japan. It was not a hardship arrangement, as his residency became the Grand Hyatt in Roppongi Hills. As his stay morphed into months, Darcy became a hotel feature and dined regularly with the manager. This, in turn, endeared special treatment and eventually he received a luxury suite for a near regular room rate. As a long term hotel resident, the staff found him friendly and interesting. Even during the winter months, he could be seen in the neighborhood walking around in a black t-shirt and short pants. Growing up in Canada, he had developed some immunity to the cold. Japanese were amazed. During this period in Japan, Darcy became close to Hisashi Saito of Ginza Seikodo. They made a habit of dining together regularly. I often joined them. We searched for venues that remained opened and that served libations which proved to be a tricky arrangement. This was during the pre-vaccination phase. These were eerie nights out because we often found ourselves the only patrons in the venues. Infection rates were like waves rising and falling. During a short window of opportunity when infections had dropped and there was a temporary respite in civic restrictions, the Grand Hyatt set up an evening of entertainment with the great Konishiki Yasokichi on ukulele and his wife as vocalist. Konishiki was the first non-Japanese born sumo wrestler to reach ozeki. Darcy got three tickets and we made the best of a great evening together. As you will see below, sword dealers are big celebrities, so even Konishiki decided to photo bomb our selfie! There were only a dozen tables and we lowered our guard… Darcy was generous as always and he picked up the tab. He loved hearing stories of my four decades in the sword trade in Japan. One night he suggested that I should initiate fireside chats on-line, smoke a pipe, and tell sword stories. We shared many laughs… When I think of Darcy, Henley’s poem “Invictus” comes to mind. Darcy accomplished much and took bold strides through life. He truly had an unconquerable soul, for which he was master and captain. As a fellow Canadian, I am proud to have been one of his friends. I raise a glass of fine Primitivo Di Maduria in his honor! Invictus By William Ernest Henley Out of the night that covers me, Black as the pit from pole to pole, I thank whatever gods may be For my unconquerable soul. In the fell clutch of circumstance I have not winced nor cried aloud. Under the bludgeoning of chance My head is bloody, but unbowed. Beyond this place of wrath and tears Looms but the Horror of the shade, And yet the menace of the years Finds and shall find me unafraid. It matters not how strait the gate, How charged with punishments the scroll, I am the master of my fate, I am the captain of my soul. Please continue to leave individual messages under Ted’s original notice. My intention is not to hijack his thread… Stay well! Robert Hughes
    26 points
  4. Hello to everyone on this thread. I am Darcy's younger brother and on behalf of our family thank you all for all of your comments about my brother. This is a tough time for our family especially after dealing with the recent loss of our father and comments such as these help us heal. With respect to preserving his nihonto web content, there is nothing that we would like more than to have his content preserved and remain available for those that share his passion. Please feel free to contact me if you have any questions or would like more information. Regards, -joel
    26 points
  5. Hey Fellas- I finally finished my sword display and study space. Thought you might enjoy taking a peek into my little world. The swords displayed on the table usually live in the the bedroom/Livingroom, but I rotate them out in the display case from time to time. In total, I have acquired 18 pieces in 3 years of active collecting, 6 of them are "mystery nihonto" the rest are papered. I think that my next step should be to get a professional appraisal of the whole lot for insurance purposes. any suggestions for how to go about this? Thanks for helping me get this far! -- JT
    23 points
  6. It’s been 2 years this month i have been waiting for this pole to rejoin the blade and saya. It’s been languishing in Japan. I am really pleased. It’s gorgeous from top to bottom. The mother of pearl is luxurious. Signed Heianjo Fujiwara Sukenobu. Just wanted to share. Mark
    20 points
  7. Hi my dear friends, First of all, I want to express my most sincere wishes and a Happy New Year to you all and your families. I know this should be in another section so Brian, please feel free to move it if you feel like it, but I posted it here because some members have contacted me and I want to reach most of them. Not sure they all go to the Izakaya. Then I guess I owe you guys an explanation and an apology for my silence those past few months. I’ve wanted to do that for quite some time but it isn’t always easy to expose your issues in front of everyone, and I know some of you may find those issues triffle or first world problems. Anyway, here’s what has happened to me since my absence. First of all, let me tell you that I’m an animal lover… maybe a little too much ! For years, I have been doing the job of a shelter for distressed cats without help or financing. At some point, I had more than 30 cats. Costly and tiring. That’s roughly three hours of work in addition to my full time job everyday. Those animals I recover are usually starving, some of them sick, all of them scared by very difficult beginnings. I’m used to have animals that don’t live long because of that. I loose some every year. Everytime, its a tragedy for me but I’ve developped some endurance to it. This year was special. I lost ten of them in a row over the space of two months. Causes of death were different but I think that the last straw was probably the last one who was litteraly and voluntarily crushed to pulp by a car and the driver purposefully drove over him with both wheels. I know it as I saw it happen. I guess it taxed me a lot and I entered some kind of a breakdown. I was starting to recover, in September, when the secong blow came. Now, here’s the second part of my life. Ten years ago, my elderly mother suffered a stroke that left her with paralysis on her left side. My father had a hard life working in construction and carrying loads so his back is ruined and he has to use a walker. Being an only child, I took them both in and care for them. Not a light job either, but one I feel I have a duty to accomplish. So, come September, my father has to be hospitalized because he had fallen in the middle of the night. His blood count was well below normal. Diagnosis : Mielodisplastic syndrome. To sum up, a bone marrow cancer that will turn into fatal leukemla in generally something like two years. That was the fatal and final blow to me. Now it’s been three months since that diagnosis and I am starting to digest it and recover. My father is responding to treatment and so far, he is neither better nor worse. There you have it ! All tis has made me depressed and apathetic, with no real interest for anything and some sort of self pitying. So I am sorry and apologize to all those who’ve contacted me and to whom I haven’t replied, I will reply to each and everyone of you. Please just give me some time as things have accumulated and I have some catching up to do. Know that I am feeling better and will do my best to stay around. Best wishes to you all, JP
    19 points
  8. Hi folks, As some of you know already, on January 27 I suffered a fire in my house (an electric radiant heat panel in the ceiling arced out). No one was injured but the house is a mess and we likely won't live in it again until this fall at the earliest. None of my swords, kodogu, or books were damaged. All the books, however, have been put into storage and won't be available until I can move home. The swords and fittings, on the other hand, I can get to. I'm keeping a list of customers who want books so I can get to them later; I'd love to deal with you on a katana or tsuba right now. If you find something at Japaneseswordbooksandtsuba.com that interests you, please let me know (contact me by email through the site). The phone # on my site is the land line and is currently dead. If you want to talk my cell is 218-340-1001. Thanks for all the support I've received from my friends in Nihonto, Grey
    18 points
  9. I'm using this post as an opportunity to share a picture of my contribution. The original template for this piece is probably an Akasaka Tsuba. The flowing design represents a Waka poem from the Kokon Waka Shu 古今和歌集: ほのぼのと明石のうら朝ぎりの島かくれゆくふねをしぞおもふ "In the bay, of Akashi, when the day is drawing to an end, my thoughts follow a boat which disappears behind an island in the mist." Thanks Christoph
    18 points
  10. HI Khalid, I have a few thoughts on this below and a great article from Guido Schiller.
    17 points
  11. Well I was having bit boring time in a fever, and I won an auction in Japan for a book about swords of the collection of Kurokawa Institute, as they have some amazing items. So an idea came to me that what if I look on some of the most impressive museum collections in Japan and gather that info in a thread. As I have already collected this data actually scooping it together was pretty fast and fun. Here are some absolute top museum collections in Japan, in no particular order. I will mostly list the number of Kokuhō (National Treasure) Jūyō Bunkazai (Important Cultural Property) and Jūyō Bijutsuhin (Important Art Object) swords in the collection. Many of these museums feature amazing items that do not have official designations, and also many have multiple NBTHK designated items. Tōkyō National Museum - https://www.tnm.jp/ Of course it does not need introductions, collection features 19 Kokuhō, 56 JūBu and 6 JūBi. Kyōto National Museum - https://www.kyohaku.go.jp/eng/index.html Similar to above not too much info needed, collection features 3 Kokuhō, 25 JūBu and 2 JūBi. NBTHK - https://www.touken.or.jp/museum/about/collection.html The Japanese Sword Museum houses an amazing collection of items. NBTHK is well known for their appraisal papers. The museum collection includes 3 Kokuhō, 13 JūBu and 13 JūBi, and also several Tokubetsu Jūyō swords. Tokugawa Art Museum - https://www.tokugawa-art-museum.jp/en/about/treasures/sword/ Museum houses over 10,000 artifacts that have been collected by Owari Tokugawa Family. Collection includes 7 Kokuhō, 19 JūBu and 21 JūBi. Sano Art Museum - https://www.sanobi.or.jp/bijutsukan/collection/japanese_sword.html Established by Sano Ryūichi in 1966. I think many know their famous exhibitions and amazing books published on them. Collection includes 2 Kokuhō, 8 JūBu and 36 JūBi also several Tokubetsu Jūyō in collection. Seikado Bunko Art Museum - http://www.seikado.or.jp/en/ Seikado Bunko Library and Art Museum houses Iwasaki family (founder of Mitsubishi group) collection, founder started collecting in 1892. There are 1 Kokuhō, 8 JūBu and 23 JūBi swords in the collection. Eisei Bunko Museum - https://www.eiseibunko.com/index.html Houses the collection of Hosokawa family, public museum was opened in 1973. Collection features 4 Kokuhō, 1 JūBu and 1 JūBi. Kurokawa Insitute of Ancient Cultures - http://www.kurokawa-institute.or.jp/ Research institute established by Kurokawa Family. Collection features 2 Kokuhō, 9 JūBu and 30 JūBi swords. Tōken World - https://www.touken-world.jp/ This newly established museum in Nagoya has acquired stunning collection of items in fairly short time span. Museum was opened in 2020. The collection has 1 Kokuhō, 10 JūBu, 41 JūBi and 58 Tokubetsu Jūyō swords. Japan Sword Museum Technology Research Foundation - http://www.nihontou.or.jp/collection.html This foundation was established in 2015. The collection includes 2 Kokuhō, 20 JūBu, 11 JūBi and 11 Tokubetsu Jūyō swords. Of course there are lots of other amazing museums in Japan that feature excellent swords and related items. And I did not include any shrines and temples in this list (some of them have spectacular items), as I might do a followup list on some of those. The current location of Kokuhō and Jūyō Bunkazai items can be tracked in here: https://kunishitei.bunka.go.jp/bsys/index as I believe their ownership is required to be informed. For Bijutsuhin items tracking down them is lot more trickier but for them I used the historical info that was on the 80's book series that featured every Bijutsuhin sword, as well as more modern info acquired from several Japanese books and magazines. Of course for the bottom 2 new collections it was easy as they list the items they have. They have acquired lot of Bijutsuhin from previously owned privately and other museums. I would also think that after some older owners have passed away some Jūyō Bijutsuhin swords (and Tokujū etc.) would have been donated to Tokyo & Kyoto National Museums, as well as NBTHK and other museums as well. I hope this might be interesting to at least some people. :D
    16 points
  12. Heianjo Fujiwara Kunishige Jumonji Yari Nagasa: 18.8cm x 14.3cm wide
    16 points
  13. Good morning all, and yes it is a good morning. A couple weeks ago I posted my concerns about a recent Tanto purchase being stolen while in the care of the USPS. Well it arrived yesterday safe and sound. I want to thank all of you here that responded with their support. I also would like to thank the seller Volker from Germany for the great transaction, the extraordinary packing and the follow up with me and DHL. Let me say to others that may end up in the same situation, Don’t Give Up, Stay On The Shipper, Don’t Except that they Can’t Find Your package and close your case. I filed 5 claims on this package with the USPS. I had the claims expedited two times. During all of this the USPS sent me Two emails stating that they were sorry but my package was untraceable and lost. I then reopened my claims and made two calls to Consumers Affairs and filed claims with them. During this time Volker was also in touch with DHL. I believe that if we didn’t stay on the USPS and had accepted that they Couldn’t Find It I would have never received it. I still believe in being Pro Active in cases like this, when something doesn’t look right or feel right, get on it right away. If you feel it may be missing post pictures here so that all the good people can be on the look out for it if it should surface and most of all DO NOT EXCEPT THE SHORT ANSWERS THAT IT IS JUST LOST. Stay on it and push it. Again thank you all for your support, thank you Volker for the sale and all your help. I am Now the Proud New Caretaker of a beautiful blade that has finally found its way to its new home. MikeR
    16 points
  14. Dear Jace. A large shinshinto katana with an o gissaki in nice original mounts, spotted many years ago as I was cycling past an antiques shop I knew. Groaned and pulled over on the basis of, "Well at least I can have a look!" Went in and drew the blade out a little to see a sticker, yes, on the blade, which said £30. Force of habit more than anything else, I asked if there was anything they could do on that and to my surprise the owner said he could do it for £28. With trembling hands I wrote the cheque, knowing that it would make me over drawn, first and last time for that. Next problem was cycling home with it. I still have it, papered now to Inshu Kanesaki. Iron mokko tsuba, gold foiled habaki and seppa, shakudo fuchi kashira and menuki of samurai fighting in boats. All the best.
    15 points
  15. First day of the show is on the books. It was well attended and looked like there wasn't an empty booth space to be had. I walked in there with a wandering eye and curious hands which I mostly scolded and kept in my pocket. Behind my eye and hands was a main drive/focus...my Unicorn Cinderella quest. I had a type 98 koshirae with sharksin saya (purchased on NMB) and wanted to find it a blade. I would mention this quest and mostly told "Good luck" and I'd take the well wishes. I knew it would be tough, but if it was to be done; this was the place. I walked booth to booth with my tsunagi with a few potentials coming and going. Hours later I had about given up while at the same time never yet losing faith. Then at the end of an aisle it happened.... I came across a Tadakuni Nidai with Hozon papers for an affordable price. I laid the tsunagi over it...huh...this might work. I tell the dealer my quest and the potential of his blade so he says, "Well lets try". I ask him do it because god forbid anything happen. He takes the blade out of shirasaya and it just happened to fit perfectly into the seppa, perfectly into the tsuba, perfectly into the tsuka...but could the mekugi ana honestly linenup as well? I heard the magic words..."they line up perfectly!". I responded "No way, you might have found my Cinderella! Now if it's a perfect fit I feel like I can't even try to haggle!" The seller then said, "ha, I'll take $100 off". Class act.... Then of course is the last and final piece...the saya. He picks up the blade perfectly mounted in my tsuka and slowly...slowly...starts to slide it in. Only the penitant blade shall pass. He continues...so far so good....and then the Cinderella moment...it fit perfectly including the habaki. Tight, nestled and safe. Lastly, it really could use one extra seppa to really snug things up. Went to Grey and Mark's table digging into Mark's tacklebox of seppa, gunto etc...parts. found the perfect seppa that lines up perfectly with the other seppa and locking mechanism. We were all systems go. No pumpkin. The only thing off was that the tsunagi was about an inch and some change longer. So Cinderella Tadakuni was a bit shorter than she could have been. This I will allow. That blade was my entire haul this year and couldn't be happier. I'm not the first to have this happen, nor will I be the last but thank you Chicago Sword Show 2022. Honorable Mentions that I Almost Bought: 1. Signed tanto early 1800s with a Fuji design in hamon...but no sun/moon. 2. Signed Gendaito (Kanesomething?) by a WW2 era smith in shirasaya who made the hada look like soundwaves all the way down the blade. Was told it was an old "forgotten or secret" (i forget the adjective used) technique only done/known by a few smiths. There were more details about the blade but I lost them in the fog. It really was quite beautiful besides its flaws but walked away without it for a few reasons. Picture collage below of seperate sword in shirasaya becoming one with the type 98 koshirae.
    15 points
  16. I hope everyone had fun looking into naginata for a change. Like many I had dreamed on having a naginata in my collection and I missed few old ones in Japan very closely in the last 5 or so years. So even though rationally I really shouldn't have even thought about this, my heart was pushing me to this when I saw this at Nihonto Australia around Christmas time. I just felt I won't be able to have a chance for such an item in long long time if I miss this one. This had passed Hozon in 2021 and here is the answer: Explanation: Zaimei naginata signed 備州長船義景 / 嘉慶三年二月日 (Bishū Osafune Yoshikage – Kakei 3 nen 2 gatsu hi [1389]). This naginata is work by second generation Yoshikage. According to tradition first generation was the son of Kagemitsu (景光) and/or a student of Chikakage (近景) and second generation was a student of Kanemitsu (兼光) it is also said that he was the son-in-law of Chōgi (長義). However more recent studies have been associating Yoshikage more closely to Osafune side lines like Chikakage (近景) and Morikage (盛景). This has been mentioned in more recent Jūyō and Tokubetsu Jūyō explanations for Yoshikage, when in earlier sources he has been put towards Sōden-Bizen group. Unfortunately, I haven’t been able to find many extant blades by the second generation Yoshikage, I will attach naginata from Jūyō 13 (dated 1388) and the description for it, it is very similar to this naginata. I translated it myself so there can be errors so I will attach the original Japanese text too. I will quote this part of it “Judging from the ordinary worksmanship, it is seen as work of second generation, these are generally referred as Kozori-mono” So the worksmanship of second generation Yoshikage seem to also fit the “outsider” group Kozori who presumably didn’t work with main line Osafune smith traditions. Kozori group is interesting as their work generally is from late Nanbokuchō to early Muromachi period and of certain style but I think there is lot to research on Kozori. With some earliest work by some Kozori smiths being around mid-Nanbokuchō period. I have listed Yoshikage as Sōden-Bizen smiths in my personal records, however due to more recent info I might have to adjust it. Unfortunately, dated items by Yoshikage smiths are extremely rare, and so far I have found only 7 items. Jūyō 61 there is a wakizashi dated 1357 Jūyō 46 there is naginata-naoshi dated 1363 NBTHK Tokubetsu Hozon tantō dated 1363 Jūyō Bunkazai wakizashi owned by Tanzan Jinja dated to 1374 Jūyō 16 there is tachi by Yoshikage dated 1379 Jūyō 13 there is the naginata dated to 1388. This naginata with NBTHK Hozon dated to 1389 Out of these 7 the first 5 items are judged as work by first generation Yoshikage, and naginata (+ I would assume this naginata for kantei) by second generation. I am also aware of 7 signed swords without date and I believe they are all attributed towards the first generation Yoshikage. 5 Tachi out of which one is also dated but the era and the smith are unreadable but attributed towards Yoshikage. And two blades with orikaeshi-mei (a katana and a wakizashi). So, the total that I have found thus far is 14 signed blades by Yoshikage. In general Naginata dated pre 1400 are extremely rare. Over the years I have gone through thousands and thousands of items in my research and so far I have been able to find only 37 naginata and naginata-naoshi that have pre 1400 date. Out of these 23 are NBTHK Jūyō and Tokubetsu Jūyō items and other 14 with various designations, some high government or provincial designations and some lower NBTHK designations etc. I am sure there are some more as I haven’t been able to dig through all items in shrine/temple collections, all museums, or imperial collection and surviving major collections etc. But the point here is that very old dated naginata are rare historically important items. Here is the naginata from Jūyō 13 and my own translation.
    15 points
  17. A fine sword by Hayama Enshin dated Taisho 15, in excellent Type 94 Koshirae.
    15 points
  18. Dear friends, It is heartwarming to see the concern felt for Guido. Please keep him in your thoughts and meditations. However, it seems the rumor mill was spinning recently regarding his situation. Guido was given follow-up surgery in December to relieve pressure that was still being exerted on his brain. The situation is still dire as there are few signs of improvement other than some eye activity and some wrist movement, but these small signs are positive. It is not known where this will lead and whether any rehabilitation can be effective. Sadly, I have nothing more to report at this time, but if I receive any developmental news, I will certainly keep our community informed. Best Regards, Robert
    15 points
  19. Please forgive for not updating a longer time. It missed being submitted to Juyo, so the first try then will be this year - another year in Japan! The time will be used nevertheless with sayagaki. I though got some additional pictures that show more of its beauty and make me look highly forward to it. Find them attached.
    15 points
  20. Item No. 120 - Copper tsuba with copper , shibuichi and gold inlays 7.93 cm x 7.18 cm x 0.46 cm Subject of falling Ginko leaves by Ford Hallam 16 years ago. On the carved copper tsuba there are inlays of three different copper alloys and two alloys of shibuichi - the gold highlights applied by fire gilding.
    15 points
  21. Hi, The carving on the Tsuba is a famous maxim/Proverbs of TAKEDA Shingen. pic #1: 人は城、人は石垣、人は堀、 (Hito wa shiro,hito wa ishigaki,hito wa hori, ) People are castles, people are stone walls, people are moats, Mei is 秀斎(Shusai/Hidesai,gago) and 直忠(Naotada). pic #2: 情けは味方、仇は敵なり。 (nasake wa mikata,ada wa kataki nari.) Sympathy is needed to the peoples,and Don't be passionate.
    15 points
  22. I got an offer to buy a great koto blade so I have to say goodbye to the best piece in my collection Tsuda Echizen-no-kami SUKEHIRO 津田越前守助広. He was born in Kanei 14 (1637), Uchide town, Settsu domain, real name Jin'nosuke 甚之丞. He learned from the 1st gen. Soboro SUKEHIRO そぼろ助廣 to realize his ambition to be a swordsmith to obtain Echizen-no-kami 越前守 title in Meireki 3 (1657). He achieved success and won fame and in Kanbun 7 (1667), Aoyama Inabanokami Munetoshi 青山因幡守宗俊 (Karo top-ranking samurai officials) of Osaka castle employed him as a retainer with a 10 fuchi salary. At the age of 31st to 38th years old - from the eighth month of Kanbun seven (1667) onwards - he executed the dated signature of the ura side in grass script and applied a keshō to his yasurime and after 38 years old - from the second month of Enpō two (延宝, 1674), he executed the signatures of both sides in grass script His general workmanship transformed from Choji-midare of smaller clove in his early years then roundish gunome or gentle wave Suguha and surging waves of Toran-ba in his later age. He was a dominant smith in his time, has been highly prized as the most superior swordsmith to have a great impact on all swordsmiths in later ages. Died young in Ten'na 2 (1682), was 46 years old. The exceptional position of this swordsmith sufficiently confirms its ranking Fujishiro: Sai-jo saku Hawley: 100 Toko Taikan: 25 mil Yen Yamada Asaemon, who was the official sword cutting ability examiner and executioner of the Tokugawa shogunate, published a book "Kaiho Kenjaku" (懐宝剣尺) in 1797 in which he ranked the cutting ability of swords. The book lists 228 swordsmiths, whose forged swords are called "Wazamono" (業物) Tsuda Echizen Sukehiro received the second highest award Ó-wazamono (excellent) which only confirms his exceptional skills This sword is in the unique style of Naginata-naoshi Katana Despite much effort, I was unable to find a second blade from Sukehiro 2nd in this unique style Wide and thick, impressive shape from which radiates strength and respect Mei: Echizen no Kami Sukehiro Nagasa: 74.5 cm Sori: 1.8 cm Motohaba: 3.2 cm Sakihaba: 2.1 cm Kissaki: 3,3 cm Motokasane: 7.5 mm Nakago: Ubu, 2 mekugi-ana, zaimei Habaki: single silver with high quality shirasaya NBTHK: Tokubetsu Hozon Kitae is well grained ko-itame with ji-nie. Beautiful texture representing Osaka jigane Hamon is nie deki gunome midare toranba style continue from the hamachi to the Kissaki area The nakago bears the five character signature of Echizen no Kami Sukehiro, which was in use around Kanbun 6 ( 1666 ), the last year before taking up work at the Osaka castle. This sword is one of the first Works that he made in establishing his Toranba style and together with the unique shape represents an exceptional opportunity to own a blade from one of the best Shinto swordsmiths 32.000 EUR + PP fee or SEPA payment incl. shipping cost within EU Photos at Hi-Res are available here https://www.zonerama.com/Nihonto/Album/6268825
    14 points
  23. I suppose I ought to add my own comments here also. Firstly I'd like to say that I genuinely appreciate the kindness, understanding and support so many have shown me. For those people who are, justifiably, not so inclined all I can say is that I regret that I have thus far been unable to get the book I had planned to the printers and delivered. Posting any sort of comment on Kickstarter has for some years now immediately drawn a flurry of vile and abusive personal messages, some even directed at my partner who has nothing to do with my book work at all. It has in fact gotten so bad that the actions of a number of named individuals have now referred to the police here in the UK with a view to issuing restraining orders. I've remained civil and calm in dealing with upset and angry people but ultimately there comes a point when nothing I can say will be enough and the stress and upset it was causing me personally was only making everything harder and much much worse. As I'm sure you all know I have devoted my life to my craft and to sharing my experience and knowledge through personal teaching, frequently for free in my own studio, the forum I established and the youtube channel which hosts over 100 hours of instructional film all available for free to everyone. This is what I do and who I am. I decided that I really needed to create the books that led to the Kickstarter project as a way to getting it all in a more usable and compact record. And to be clear, the Kickstarter project was for a single book, with a further 7 planned after that but as an entirely separate thing. The first book is on Metals, alloys and patination, a history and practical manual. The contents page of that book as well as two or three draft chapters were shared on kickstarter ages ago. I got caught up with going too far in my research and the project ultimately became a significant challenge. This started to happen as my health took a turn for the worse. For those of you who don't know I've essentially been disabled since 2001. The exact condition I live with is: There's more detailed info here if you're inclined to read more. A couple of heart attacks followed by a bout of covid led to a pretty serious decline in all aspects of my health, mental and physical, culminating last autumn in my having extensive medical investigations to alleviate my situation. Up until a couple of weeks ago I was down to less than 29% oxygen transfer through my lungs and walking 25 meters meant suffering pretty bad chest pains and awfully weak arms and legs, which then took 5 or ten minutes to recover from. As a result of the medical investigations I started a new treatment 10 days ago and while I'm only half way through working up to the dosages planned I was yesterday able to walk from my car to the studio without stopping and with very little chest pain. Only a distance of about 80 meters but already a significant improvement. I feel I still have a way to go yet but believe I will regain enough vitality and stamina to get back to the levels of work and intensity I once took for granted. The last 6 months have been particularly tough and I wasn't confidant things were going to improve at all. I'm still coming to terms with the reassessment of my condition and the hopeful prognosis now offered. I'm proud of the work I've done on the book and I will get it published, a Europe/Japan Educational Foundation has assured me of that support. But right now I'm having to concentrate of regaining some degree of wellbeing and doing what I can to support my family. This is why I am presently unable to continue work on tosogu, it's simply just too demanding, but instead have returned to my original trade as goldsmith. The jobs are easier and quicker so I can cope with that level of studio activity right now. I've decided to post this today, not by way of an excuse or to try and appease angry men, but to share the reality of what I'm dealing with with those of you who have continued to care, support and have faith in me. I don't like discussing such painful and personal matters like this in public but I feel I owe you this. I don't think there's much point in me returning to this thread or saying anything further. Thanks for reading and I'll be back in the game when I'm more able. All the best Ford
    14 points
  24. The honest answer is you cant tell. But it is also important to remember where the wealth was during the Edo period. Merchants were able to afford better blades and far better koshirae than impoverished samurai. They also had a more flamboyant taste. Many of the finest wakizashi seen in beautiful mounts were made for merchants. At the top end Senior retainers would have blades and fittings made by the best smiths. lower ranking samurai would have what they could afford. Merchants would buy what they liked and what demonstrated their wealth and sophistication. The reason that many modern collectors look down on wakizashi is they cannot be sure they were carried by samurai and for some this lessens their historical value. It has also been suggested in the past that Smiths put less effort in to making wakizashi for non samurai. I think this is demonstrably incorrect. Why would a smith risk their repuion and alienate their most lucrative customer base by making a substandard piece?
    14 points
  25. You are so right, Brian. Hyper intelligent, cerebral and over analytical, which naturally lent itself to dissection of behaviours, moral codes, ethical standards…. And sometimes approaching matters clinically and logically, while in our life often emotions and irrationality rule. He sought honesty in people and would give people second chances, even if the initial reaction might have been explosive. But I appreciated that as we connected on that moral plane in the approach to the world. For him, the commercial aspect took second place, way behind the educational aspect and connecting with people. He would love to find the “right” item for the “right” person, sometimes going through years-long hurdles and obstacles and personal difficulty to facilitate this for his close circle. And the sleepless nights he spent answering even the most ridiculous of emails and random enquiries in his honest, lengthy, didactic manner. Trying to teach, elucidate, steer. Often taking other people’s burdens upon himself. Anyway, I am sure several of the board members can go on and on and on even more than me. So very sad really…. shattering ….and frankly unfair to have gone so young, with so much potential and with his big, generous heart…..
    14 points
  26. Hi guys thought I would share this katana that arrived two days before Christmas. Signed Kasama Ikkansai Shigetsugu saku A day in August 1937 Merry Christmas
    14 points
  27. I am visiting my parents at the moment so I don't have access to my references for proper translation. However here is a quick listing of sword items (I skipped fittings and armor pieces as I would maybe make some errors there) 2. Naotsugu 3. Mitsutada 4. Kotetsu 7. Tadayoshi 8. Sa Kunihiro 9. Ichi (Fukuoka Ichimonji) 10. Kotetsu 11. Sukenao 12. Norinaga 13. Kunimitsu 14. Kanesada 15. Masakatsu 16. Mumei Kikuchi yari 17. Masahiro 18. Yasutsugu 19. Nagamitsu 20. Jubi attributed to Mihara Masaie 21. Hikobei Sukesada 22. Tadayoshi 23. Masao 27. Hankei 28. Motoshige 29. Suishinshi Masatsugu 30. Kanemitsu 32. Nanki Shigekuni 33. Yosozaemon Sukesada 34. Taikei Naotane 35. Tadamitsu 36. Ujifusa 37. Sukehiro 38. Masayuki 39. Sukenao 40. Naoe Shizu 41. Sa Kunihiro 42. Kanesada 44. Kunitomo 45. Unsho 50. Naganori 51. Yasutsugu 52. Nanki Shigekuni 53. Hankei 54. Motohira 55. Masayuki 56. den Naritaka 57. Taima 59. Masayoshi 60. Motohira 61. Taikei Naotane 66. Sa Hiroyasu 67. Taikei Naotane 68. Yasuyoshi 69. den Chogi 70. Rai Kuniyuki 71. Muramasa 72. Tairyusai Soukan 73. Tairyusai Soukan 74. Tadamitsu 75. Left: Heianjo Nagayoshi Right:Nobuhide 76. Sadatoshi 77. den Rai Kunitoshi 78. Aoe 79. Tadatsuna 80. den Ichimonji 81. Nobufusa (Ko-Ichimonji) 82. Yoshifusa (Fukuoka Ichimonji) 83. Nobuhide 84. Norishige 85. Shinjuro Sukesada 86. Yasutsugu 93. Kanesada 94. Aoe 95. Shigeyuki (Owari) 97. Gassan Sadatoshi 98. Yasutsugu 99. Kunimura (Enju) 100. Rai Kunitoshi 101. Kunitsugu
    14 points
  28. The Car is the "Magnolia Special". I built her from scratch, and she now lives on the second floor of building that I also built from scratch. Check it out, thanks for asking! Brian - Apologies for getting off topic.-- JT
    14 points
  29. The results for Jūyō 67 just came online. https://www.touken.or.jp/Portals/0/第67回重要刀剣等指定品発表.pdf Another very interesting session with lot to think about. Of course lot of wondering on my part as not having info or pictures of the items. I was very excited to see two Ōdachi in this session as they are incredibly rare. I believe these ones Morimitsu & Masaie are in the collection of Yasukuni Jinja. Both were previously unknown to me and seem to be longest examples by each ot the smiths that I am aware of. I did the swords in similar format as I've done before for my index and eventually when I have time for all the non-blade items I will update that to include the most recent results. Jūyō 67 swords.docx
    13 points
  30. It was a busy year with not much time for Tosogu, but I came away with 3 or 4 things that I will enjoy for a while. I do not currently have photos of the ko-goto kogai, but it came from a friend... as most of my pieces seem to do these days.
    13 points
  31. Hello, I share with you an interesting historical armor from my collection, this object belonged to HORI HIDEMASA a Daimyo of the momoyama era. This armor is from the early Momoyama period (around 1575), probably donated by Nobunaga. Indeed on the "Kote" is found the Mon of Oda and an impressive Kashiradate in the shape of a nail which is a reminder of the Mon of HORI (Mon in the shape of a nail puller): The armor dates from the period when Hidemasa was in campaign in the service of ODA Nobunaga between 1572 and 1582. Mon from HORI clan : In 1566 at the age of 13 he entered as a page in the service of Oda Nobunaga, in 1572 he was present during the campaign against the Azai and the Asakura (The Chronicle of Lord Nobunaga / by Ota Gyuichi; translated and edited by JSA Elisonas and JP Lamers). In 1575, he took part in Nobunaga's assaults against the Ikkō-ikki of Echizen province and fought the saika-ikki two years later, commanding Nobunaga's army in the company of Hashiba Hideyoshi and Sakuma Nobumori. He is also at the head of a corps of arquebusiers in several battles including that of Komaki and Nagakute which opposed him to TOKUGAWA IYEASU. On the death of Nobunaga he became one of the closest Daimyo to HIDEYOSHI until his death in 1590 at the siege of ODAWARA Castle, he participated in many campaigns with this armor. Détails from front and behind the Do : This armor comes from the collections of the LII ARMOR Museum in Kyoto and exhibited at the LIDA City Museum during a retrospective on the HORI family : The original bitsu :
    13 points
  32. I received some flak recently from the popcorn gallery about a statement I made previously about the horimono being the most essential element in an Ikkanshi Tadatsuna. A few interesting examples came up recently that confirmed what I've been saying (I mean, I do not pull this kind of statement out of my butt... I am told this kind of thing by people like Tanobe sensei and Kurokawa san and then it's verified in the marketplace, I don't tend to go around making things up though that claim is often made). Anyway Aoi has a fine Tadatsuna wakizashi on their site now: https://www.aoijapan.com/wakizashiawataguchi-ikkanshi-tadatsuna-hori-do-saku/ And this blade is actually short even for a wak, 46 cm... but it features good horimono by the smith along with his attestation that he made the horimono. Tadatsuna almost need to be looked at as buying a horimono with a sword as a frame. You don't want a junk sword but getting yourself bent out of shape on the sword or buying one that is long and nice without horimono misses the point. Aoi has sold blades like that in the 2.6-2.8M yen in the past, good long katana but lacking the horimono. This example entirely agrees with what I've said in my blog where I highlight which might be his master work which is only 63 cm... many longer examples exist but that one has the best horimono of them all. If you took the time to look through the Dai Token Ichi catalog you will find another Tadatsuna, and the way the dealer featured the listing, they didn't even bother to show the sugata of the blade. Rather, they made a point to highlight the horimono and nakago indicating that the smith made the horimono himself. So the sugata is basically relatively unimportant compared to these other elements when it comes to this smith, so much so that it's not even used in advertising this particular blade. Understanding these things, understanding what makes a certain smith special and precious, and then so what metrics apply to that smith, or that school, or that period in terms of separating the wheat from the chaff is extremely important for both dealers and for collectors. Otherwise as a collector you pat yourself on the back for buying a "cheap" example but the reason it was cheap is because the market is efficient: it is lacking the features that would make it more expensive and you may be ignorant of what those features are. Like a coin collector who knows the ins and outs, the rare years or weird kinds of marks that may appear on just a very few coins, they've studied all of the subject matter and know which elements are those that separate the most collectible from the least. And so those metrics have a direct bearing on the price. With Tsuda Sukehiro a shorthand can be found in the signature. Those signed Echizen no Kami Sukehiro, are superceded by those signed Tsuda Echizen no Kami Sukehiro, and those in turn superceded by those done with round grass script in the mei, those are called in dealer circles "maru Tsuda." These form a rule of thumb. A certain example from the first type can pass Juyo and a certain example of the last type may not pass Juyo, but people who try to make statistical conclusions from one item are falling into a fallacy of anecdotal evidence. The groups, taken as groups, are partitioned into generally better work as the mei evolves, the mei evolves along with Sukehiro's experience and development as a swordsmith. So this information is NOT why the blade becomes more valuable, but it happens in the case of this smith to be a handy indicator of when in his career it was made and so what the skill level of the maker was at the time. It just parallels his development. When a dealer comes and a customer doesn't understand the difference the dealer can conflate it all together and say well this one signed like this is a bargain because the average price of Sukehiro is higher... but the average price of Sukehiro is higher because in general a blade signed that way in the example the dealer is pushing is falling into a lesser category. Again, standout examples exist and that's why you should study and know what you see, but dealers who buy on the one hand with advanced metrics and then turn around and say "hogwash" when they sell are engaging in a form of ignorance arbitrage. They are buying in an informed market and selling in an uninformed market, and that allows there to be profit. Nobody should be telling you the horimono of a Tadatsuna is not an important part or less than the most significant part of the blade. A well preserved and excellently executed horimono is what we seek in this blade, along with the smith's attestation that he made it. This of course is the precise reason that makes that aspect of these works a target for fakery. Because the guys faking it tend to know how important it is, and even their attempt to fake it might go over the heads of people who are buying simply on length.
    13 points
  33. Time has come to update the software again. We are a few versions behind and need to keep up as many of the updates are security related. We get a lot of brute force attacks. New software will come with some improvements. But also a little bit of change. I don't think anything major. Anyways, I'll be using some of the backup funds to pay an expert to to the update. I am too scared to break stuff. It is planned around Thursday sometime. Maybe US evening time. So if you find the forum offline, note that it won't be for long. We'll be up and running asap. Thanks all.
    13 points
  34. For me, I couldn't part with my gunto that was giving to Flight Engineer 2/Lt Willam Warburton from Flying tiger by the Chinese Communist new 4th army 4th division, which saves him from the Japanese army. Warburton was on B29 from 40th Bomb Group plane #237. It was shot down on November 11, 1944, on the mission to bombing target in Nanking.It's no a pretty sword but the story behind it is priceless. The group photo is NOT 2/Lt Willam's crew but other flying tiger pilots rescued by N4A.
    13 points
  35. With the cheap items that may not sell well? My suggestion is to use them to get new collectors into this hobby. Sell them at modest/low prices with a full and honest explanation to the new collector of the item's potential. Last month, I was going to sell a mumei wakizashi to a father whose son was really interested in nihonto. The blade itself was no catch and fairly abused, and would have made no financial sense to restore. I was upfront about that with him. And when it came time for him to see it and other potential blades, to my surprise, he had brought his son! His son looked at several of my blades and had his heart set on a slightly more expensive wakizashi than the original one I had proposed for a potential new collector. It was a modest blade in shirasaya and reasonable polish with a rather nice gold and shakudo habaki, mid-1700's blade. I could see how much it meant to him, so I knocked about 30% off my price on this blade so it was affordable for him. Taught him all about the blade, related terminology, and how to care for it that I could. And now we may very well have a new ITK member! So even though I ate a little bit of the profit on that blade, I feel pretty good about getting someone new into nihonto.
    12 points
  36. Brethren, Just stumbled across this site I haven't seen before: https://www.spoon-tamago.com/2020/02/05/eliza-scidmore-photographed-everyday-life-in-Japan-over-100-years-ago/?mc_cid=77cafa5ffb&mc_eid=962267c38c There are numerous 'by-way' tags of interest there too. Bestests, BaZZa.
    12 points
  37. Hi everyone, I felt kind of lonely the last two years in Japan. No Daitokenichi, no friends being able to come... Now it seems Japan closes its borders again! That's why I would like to invite you to go on a treasure hunt with me, let's see what the Japanese flea markets offer. I will go on Sunday 5th to Tomioka Hachimangu and try to take pictures of any Kodogu related items they offer. If anyone is interested to join virtually, here is a link to the telegram channel. Everyone in Japan who wants to join me is very welcome as well! https://t.me/+1JKJ01sQGZcyMWI1 If you like to buy any item, I will take a 10 % service charge plus shipping. Please let me know if you found the link on the NMB so that I can make a 20 % donation of the profit. See you on the market!
    12 points
  38. If I understood correctly, you are looking to see some swords made for or used by Japanese shogunate. Well here are some: The first one, Monoyoshi, made by Sadamune, used by Tokugawa Ieyasu. The rumour was when Tokugawa went into battle with this Wakizashi, he would always win. Passed down to his ninth son, Yoshinao, Lord of Owari. Second one, a tachi attributed to Aoe Sadaji. It was originally 75cm but it was shortened to 60.3cm. It was named "Nikkari", comes from the legend that after it slashed a ghost who was smiling, turned out next morning a stone pagoda had been cut into two. Dedicated to Hideyoshi by Nagahide. And Hideyoshi 's son Hideyori presented it to Takatsugu. Third one, the one and only long blade made by Awataguchi Yoshimitsu, master of tanto..They called this blade Ichigo Hitofuri(the one and only lifetime sword). It was owned by Ashikaga family during the Sengoku period. Later on it was dedicated to Hideyoshi and as he was short, he had the sword shortened to 69cm(it was originally 86cm) It was burned in the great fire of Meiriki but Tokugawa family had Echizen Yasutsugu recover it. Later on, Tokugawa Mochinaga presented it to Emperor Komei. Has been passed on as an imperial property since then. Fourth one, Tokugawa Ieyasu's favorite sword, made by Sukezane of Bizen. Originally belonged to Kato Kiyomasa, presented it as his congratulations on his daughter's marriage to the tokugawa. And the last but not least, Dojigiri Yasutsuna, belonged to Minamoto no Yorimoto. Built at the end of the Heian period, had been inherited in the Ashikaga Shogun..passed on to Oda Nobunaga, Hideyoshi, and Tokugawa Ieyasu. It wasn't used in any battle, but the cutting quality had been proven by cutting six corpses in the Edo period.
    12 points
  39. One of my favourite Kai Gunto (Navy Sword). A 65cm Komiya Shiro Kunimitsu, no date no stamps. This Gendai-to exhibits the features you would expect in a sword this highly rated smith, including abundant NIE. The SAYA is finished in the rare matt finish, the fittings all have matching numbers, and the VERY rare securing lanyard is still attached. It is my belief that his descendants are making knives today using the Shiro name.
    12 points
  40. The first time I ever performed hi-togi during my apprenticeship, I asked my sensei the same question. He explained that sometimes the asymmetry in the hi-saki is done deliberately, as ending the hi on both sides in the exact same spot can create a weak point in the kissaki, which puts that area at higher risk of taking fatal damage during use. However, he added that not all hi are carved with this in mind, and some asymmetry you see here could’ve been caused by polishing, but polishing alone doesn’t account for all cases. The same explanation was given to me by a mukansa-ranked tosho, who occasionally used this technique, depending on the dimensions of the blade.
    12 points
  41. O Suriage Tachi late Kamakura Circa 1290-1300. 68 cm NBTHK Tokubetsu Hozon attribution to Yamato Taima Specifically to Cho Aritoshi Cho is short for Chobeinojo Aritoshi This school takes its name from the Taimadera temple in Nara. They made swords for the warrior monks who protected the holdings and land belonging to the temple. They rarely signed these swords and the works of this school are rare . Sayagaki by Mr Tonobe The Hada of this sword is really beautiful.
    12 points
  42. Good afternoon, this is very sad news and I just found out today. I have read all these posts and it’s sad and amazing that I knew almost nothing of this part of his life. Darcy clearly had some good friends in his circle. It was nice to read the post from Joel, and I hope you, Stu and your families are well - sorry to hear of your father’s passing. My name is Dave Renaud, and I considered Darce a good friend when we were young. My brother Chris and I met Darcy in 1981 when we moved to Windsor. He was funny and ridiculously smart. He introduced Dungeons and Dragons to us - my bro and I, and Andrew and Deano. Many nights were spent in the basement playing, and he was Dungeon Master of course. He would take away “intelligence points” from our characters when we got silly or started acting like idiots. We also bought dirt bikes when we were 12 to join him on the trails - many great days out in the bush at Renoni’s hills. Like most kids of the 80s, the mall was a place to go and hang out, and Dragon’s Lair, and Joust were the video games of choice. We played hockey and football together in high school, and spent some great days on paddle trips on the Pine River, in Michigan - a place he had gone with his Dad. Those paddle trips for us started in 1989 with 5 or 6 of us in grade 12 or so, and would carry on for years, with numbers of paddlers in the dozens - so much fun. I am truly sorry to hear of Darcy’s passing and I hope some of these stories from his childhood share a bit more of the boy that became an incredible man. DJ
    12 points
  43. Congratulations Mr,Ian B. Your Norishige sword on TV news in Japan . https://www3.nhk.or.jp/lnews/kagoshima/20220224/5050017950.html
    12 points
  44. I'll let you decide which is which.lol Basically three for one money the Jakushi dragon in my eye. Its signed,the blossom is signed Tadamune the other well maybe gift for that nephew you really dislike. All in neighborhood of 2.5 x 2.5 inches. So what your really doing is helping Brian out and get three orphan to do as you wish. Going to start the bidding at $50. Hi bidder to pay part shipping if not in USA. Ill cover it here in North America.
    12 points
  45. Let me boast a little bit "Nihon No Bi" is an annual exhibition in Moscow devoted first of all to Ikebana and Suibokuga arts. This year it was expanded and included other Japanese arts like kimono, temari, kamono and origami. There was a showcase with three katana as well. I had an opportunity to participate with several tsuba, so I had two small showcases.
    12 points
  46. Yours to do as you want. But this forum consists of collectors and guys who don't even speak over a Japanese sword in case they get droplets on it, and who won't put a sword on a hard surface. Not hard to work out that watching someone cut household things with it would not go down well. Really, don't hold it against guys who hold these things in such high regard. Posting stuff like that publicly was never going to end well. It's nothing personal. Topic closed.
    12 points
  47. So, what is there not to like about a Kai Gunto? And what is there not to like if it has a MINATAGOWA JINJA blade? Here is a January, 1943, MASANAO. A colleague recently commented that war time blades normally have a badly cut nakago, this one proves that some are cut pretty nicely.
    12 points
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