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Showing content with the highest reputation on 09/19/2021 in all areas

  1. Item No. 120 - Copper tsuba with copper , shibuichi and gold inlays 7.93 cm x 7.18 cm x 0.46 cm Subject of falling Ginko leaves by Ford Hallam 16 years ago. On the carved copper tsuba there are inlays of three different copper alloys and two alloys of shibuichi - the gold highlights applied by fire gilding.
    2 points
  2. Simply described as "Yoshiro Tsuba....Edo Period". The attachment of the two copper inserts using rivets rather than being soldered in place interested me. I once read somewhere that it wasn't until the Dutch arrived in Japan in around 1600 and later that the Japanese learned how to solder metal to metal. Prior to that it was by riveting and or fukurin. Hence early san mei constructed tsuba were riveted. A good friend of mine (and yours) has a lovely example using this construction. Tsuba measures 71 x 67.5 x 5 mm and includes inlaid copper vines (?) and leafs. The precision of the inset of the two copper inlays/plates into the excavated iron base plate is very accurate. There is a little surface damage between the hitsu ana and the kogai (?) ana but mostly it is in fairly good shape. If any one would like to comment then I would as always be grateful.
    2 points
  3. This sword has now been sold to a lucky Australian collector. Thanks everyone for your kind words.
    2 points
  4. Hi Jon, I can't see every character clearly but if the smith was true to his form it says, Noshu Seki no Ju Ni JU San Dai Fujiwara Kanefusa Kore wo Saku. Grey
    2 points
  5. Well, with one word: “congratulations!”
    2 points
  6. it dosnt matter what you paid as long as its the best example you found that you can afford. always by the best you can. then press repeat, and when you have got 4 of each then your in a good spot in life hahahahaha
    1 point
  7. Thanks Piers for your interest which is always welcome. Yes, as well as I can tell that is how it looks- the two copper circular inserts sit on a thinned out circular iron layer(thinned out from the plates original thickness). That is how it seems to me and my wife as well. Unfortunately my eyesight is a long way from what it once was. I must say that the kogai and kozuka ana seem to show an evenly 3 layered construction- copper each side of iron I am surmising but in the hitsu ana, one side of the opening looks to be in order but looking at the other wall there is a gap between one of the copper plates and the iron. If it was all iron (which it is not) then you would think a welding together of the metal had failed- a cold shut I think it is called ? We tried to get a pic of this- maybe we should try again ? Roger j
    1 point
  8. Back in 2017 I bought a rabbit tsuba plaque just for fun. I discovered yesterday, through chance that it was one of a set probably made in the 1970s. I was wondering what the kanji in the corner says ? I presume the theme is one of the animals of the Asian Zodiac. Anyone know the significance of the wall hanger? The 'tsuba' is made of bisque pottery with the decoration 'painted' on. For those interested there are two, part sets listed on Etsy. [removed from their display boards] I say part sets as there should be twelve in total. https://www.etsy.com/au/listing/1076239617/Japanese-pottery-samurai-sword-parts and https://www.etsy.com/au/listing/1076239513/Japanese-pottery-samurai-sword-parts No sympathy please, they are just a novelty. Just for fun what do you think of this tanto guard? UFO or lost Umbrella These are not the only 'pottery' examples, a porcelain paperweight from a sale also back in 2017
    1 point
  9. Finally some good news from Japan! The two blades (a Katana and a Wakizashi/Sun Nobi Tanto) that I had in for Shinsa since June have both passed for Hozon. I have to get some restoration work done on the koshirae of one of them, and also have to get a shirasaya made as it does not have one. So it will probably be a few more months before I actually have them in hand. I don't have a full report on the details of the Shinsa. I only know that they have passed at this time. I suppose that it will take another month or two before the Origami are actually produced. I have never gone through this process before, and really had no idea how long things take to happen. I will be curious to see the results for the Katana especially as it had two sets of older kicho papers. It was judged as Fujishima the first time and judged as Shitahara the second time.
    1 point
  10. Gwyn one of your images shows two seppa on the one side of the tsuba - it shouldn't logically misalign the tsuka [the thickness overall is the same ] but have you tried all configurations? Thinner/thicker seppa?
    1 point
  11. Great to hear Ryo. Im glad people like them as much as I do. The strength and quality for the price really is exceptional. Thank you
    1 point
  12. I offer for sale a well made WW2 sword in '98 mounts, that would impress the most fastidious collector. A (Kojima) KANEMICHI sword in the very scarce Aluminium Saya, with large nodule ray-skin Same under an undamaged wrap. Fittings are all there, matching and nice condition. Being aluminium, the Saya has a few rub marks from war time use, but is above the usual condition found on these. KANEMICHI was a 2 Million Yen swordsmith, and an Army approved and registered RJT smith. Even his SHOWATO swords are of a high-grade standard! And as such, this blade doesn't have a boring plain Suguha Hamon, it displays care and detail in its making. The signature and date on the very nice Nakago, are nicely cut. The blade has no rust, no pits, no chips, no stains. It is from my collection, and is making way for another sword. I can't keep everything, no matter how nice! At only AUD 2700, (thats about USD 2000) express shipped included anywhere. PM me to discuss.
    1 point
  13. To NMB Members, I just finished packing this past weeks orders. Worked most days until 1:00AM. Between running to the PO for shipping quotes and receiving payments via MO, PayPal, and Wire Transfers, answering Emails, ... it has been hectic. I must thank those whom have made purchases and / or just emailed to say hello to an old enthusiast. Among those who made a MAJOR PURCHASE was a Dr. James B. McNicholas from Virginia. This gentleman was very professional in his dealings and I can recommend him wholeheartedly. I must go to Winnipeg, MB to see my eye surgeon on Tuesday, 21 September. I will return Wednesday afternoon and I promise to list a Sword and a grouping of Tanegashima Accessories PDQ. The Nobuyoshi Sword is NO LONGER available as it is on hold pending payment. Ron Watson
    1 point
  14. Come on Bob, that is just my worthless oppinion but even if a well known idiot like me can tell this is a signed text book example then why would a much smarter person not? On a blade like this there is no room for questions, uncertainity nor interpretation left. So why care for papers? As I said before I am an idiot but not so dumb as I would waste any money or getting confirmed by whoever to what is obvious.
    1 point
  15. Sorry it took me a while. Here are a few shots of both sides and the mimi, showing the welding of the two metals.
    1 point
  16. Pity. I wonder if he had more than one set of koshirae and sent the wrong one? Is the fitting waaay off? No change of climate change causing it to shrink a little? If it were me, I'd display it proudly as an example of a good quality koshirae, unrelated to the sword. Nothing wrong with collecting and displaying just a koshirae. The other option, if the saya fits, is to use the fittings and have someone make a new tsuka?
    1 point
  17. Dojo group buy. Have another in the works. Everybody is quite impressed with the quality and price.
    1 point
  18. This was a gift from Enomoto Sadahito for purchasing one of his fathers blades. A letter opener, all signed. Top dude, he really didnt have to do that but i was chuffed that he did.
    1 point
  19. Congratulations to whomever picks this up! You're getting an amazing blade at a wonderful price. Neil truly has some of the best wartime stuff I've seen.
    1 point
  20. Chris, when I originally got this sword (paid more than I am selling it for!), I saw hada and a nice hamon, and without checking the nakago, assumed it was traditionally made Gendai. Because Kanemichi was an RJT smith, who made great swords. It may have been a good one that got a stamp some how, who knows, but it is what it is. When I saw the aluminium saya, and premium fittings, you assume a good blade is inside. And it does look much nicer in the hand than the photos. Any buyer won't be disappointed . A sensible offer close to my asking price may be considered, as it deserves a loving home.
    1 point
  21. Amazing blade at an amazing price!! I
    1 point
  22. I have bought from Neil many times. and i will say this..... i have NEVER been unhappy. his swords are always far far far better in hand then his photos present.
    1 point
  23. Perfect condition Neil. The blade looks incredible for a showato. I see under the filter clearly ashi.
    1 point
  24. Item No. 119 Iron Tsuba with details in gold , shibuichi , copper and silver 7.82 cm x 7.24 cm x 0.55 cm Subject of Eagle and Monkey signed Hiroyoshi ( Mito school ) The artist was part of the Tamagawa & Uchikoshi branch of Mito . He had family name of Marukawa and worked in the 1st half of the 19th cent. c.1840's. Haynes H01449.0 The swooping eagle's beak has taken a bit of a knock and needs redefining - nothing major ( perhaps as a result of drunk diving ) , otherwise a piece in nice condition . Part of an auction lot about five years ago.
    1 point
  25. The round end of nakago makes me think Bizen.
    1 point
  26. G'day Guys, So far I have identified 53 examples of Gassan Sadakatsu katana from the net. This looks like it may be about as far as I can go without more help. Here are a couple of extra things I have picked up. The average length of his blades is 68.0cm with the shortest being 64cm and longest 72.7cm. All, but a handful are signed with his kao. Of these with no kao, two are star stamped. As a general rule, those without a kao, don't seem to be quite as good as his kao'd blades. I have only found two star stamped examples, both made in 1943. I have found only six kogarasu examples. Of these, three were made with steel smelted by the Japan Iron Sand Steel Industry Company. It almost seems as if he set out to make a blade in every style he knew to see how they would turn out using this new steel. Or perhaps he was commissioned by the company to do this, although there is no mention of this in the company history. Cheers, Bryce
    1 point
  27. David, There was no "standard" seppa configuration. Most of the time, you'll see 4 or 6. Getting into 8 or a grouping with the "fat" seppa, often comes with custom or upgraded fittings. For the menuki fit, I think once you add the missing seppa, the whole thing is going to tighten up enough that you won't notice it. One side, tightly fitted should work sufficiently. I have a gunto (or 2) with a menuki so short it doesn't go through all the way out the other side, and the fit is tight.
    1 point
  28. Thanks again Kyle, I will do just that and this translation will go into the box. I will take a couple photos of the rest of the tsuba later today or tomorrow and post them. Cheers, Bob
    1 point
  29. You are very welcome, Bob. Just to bring together the parts of the translation (adding Steve’s contribution) and presenting it line-by-line as on the hakogaki (just in case you want to print it out and include in the box): Asai Ryōun, master of fish prints (浅井良云魚拓名人也) Student of Ryōkan, resident of Yotsuya in Edo (良寛門人江戸四谷住) A person of the year of Kyōwa [1801] (享和年問人) Please do post the other side of the tsuba. I have seen a couple of tsuba which have been made with two separate plates, both of which were Gotō Ichijō (one of was signed, the other in the Ichijō hot-stamp style), and were made of shakudo and copper, and shakudo and shibuichi respectively. I can post pictures, if you are interested. However, I’ve never seen a soft metal and iron together.
    1 point
  30. Item no. 109 - Iron Tsuba 6.96 cm x 6.64 cm x 0.58 cm Subject of single dragon rising through water and clouds with Udenuki-ana. Remains of a signature - age and school unknown. Acquired as part of a collection Item No. 110 - Iron Tsuba 8.49 cm x 8.29 cm x 0.48 cm on plain , 0.83 cm over pattern Subject of a pair ( male & female ) dragons by Masatsune? Bushu Ito school , late 18th cent. Large tsuba that appears to have been carved from a single piece of iron . Great patina and general condition.
    1 point
  31. Item No. 108 - Iron Tsuba with gold 76.9 cm x 7.12 cm x 0.56 cm Subject of peony and shi-shi in sunken relief cave or caverns. Signed Yoshihiro- age unknown. Could this Yoshihiro be from the Myochin lineage ? If so it would be of considerable age but somehow it feels younger in the hand. High grade workmanship all round with painstaking details on the rock carving and a highly animated shi-shi almost leaping free from the plate. The peony, eye and bud appear to have been carved from solid gold . The plate itself showing pleasing grain structure , not untypical of Myochin , hence the question above regarding artist school. As usual , any comments , help or corrections gratefully received.
    1 point
  32. Dear Bob, when we see a wasp on tosogu it is often wordplay (which the ancient Japanese loved). One of the more common combinations is wasp and monkey which in Japanese are homophonous with “granted fiefdom” and “lord” respectively. So a monkey grasping a wasp means the good fortune of being made the lord of a fiefdom, but a monkey simply watching or ignoring a wasp means something like “don’t waste your opportunities”. See the following NMB thread for more info on that theme: https://www.militaria.co.za/nmb/topic/30375-ishiguro-masatsune-2nd-generation/ In the case of your tsuba Item No. 104, wasp can be read as Hou (or Hachi) in Japanese and deer can be read as roku (or shika). “Hou” plus “roku” makes Houroku which sounds like the word for the “stipend or salary” that a Samurai receives when starting out as a warrior. This makes your tsuba an excellent tsuba for a gift to a new Samurai. Darcy has another beautiful example and explanation of this theme here: https://yuhindo.com/goto-joshin/
    1 point
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