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  1. I got an offer to buy a great koto blade so I have to say goodbye to the best piece in my collection Tsuda Echizen-no-kami SUKEHIRO 津田越前守助広. He was born in Kanei 14 (1637), Uchide town, Settsu domain, real name Jin'nosuke 甚之丞. He learned from the 1st gen. Soboro SUKEHIRO そぼろ助廣 to realize his ambition to be a swordsmith to obtain Echizen-no-kami 越前守 title in Meireki 3 (1657). He achieved success and won fame and in Kanbun 7 (1667), Aoyama Inabanokami Munetoshi 青山因幡守宗俊 (Karo top-ranking samurai officials) of Osaka castle employed him as a retainer with a 10 fuchi salary. At the age of 31st to 38th years old - from the eighth month of Kanbun seven (1667) onwards - he executed the dated signature of the ura side in grass script and applied a keshō to his yasurime and after 38 years old - from the second month of Enpō two (延宝, 1674), he executed the signatures of both sides in grass script His general workmanship transformed from Choji-midare of smaller clove in his early years then roundish gunome or gentle wave Suguha and surging waves of Toran-ba in his later age. He was a dominant smith in his time, has been highly prized as the most superior swordsmith to have a great impact on all swordsmiths in later ages. Died young in Ten'na 2 (1682), was 46 years old. The exceptional position of this swordsmith sufficiently confirms its ranking Fujishiro: Sai-jo saku Hawley: 100 Toko Taikan: 25 mil Yen Yamada Asaemon, who was the official sword cutting ability examiner and executioner of the Tokugawa shogunate, published a book "Kaiho Kenjaku" (懐宝剣尺) in 1797 in which he ranked the cutting ability of swords. The book lists 228 swordsmiths, whose forged swords are called "Wazamono" (業物) Tsuda Echizen Sukehiro received the second highest award Ó-wazamono (excellent) which only confirms his exceptional skills This sword is in the unique style of Naginata-naoshi Katana Despite much effort, I was unable to find a second blade from Sukehiro 2nd in this unique style Wide and thick, impressive shape from which radiates strength and respect Mei: Echizen no Kami Sukehiro Nagasa: 74.5 cm Sori: 1.8 cm Motohaba: 3.2 cm Sakihaba: 2.1 cm Kissaki: 3,3 cm Motokasane: 7.5 mm Nakago: Ubu, 2 mekugi-ana, zaimei Habaki: single silver with high quality shirasaya NBTHK: Tokubetsu Hozon Kitae is well grained ko-itame with ji-nie. Beautiful texture representing Osaka jigane Hamon is nie deki gunome midare toranba style continue from the hamachi to the Kissaki area The nakago bears the five character signature of Echizen no Kami Sukehiro, which was in use around Kanbun 6 ( 1666 ), the last year before taking up work at the Osaka castle. This sword is one of the first Works that he made in establishing his Toranba style and together with the unique shape represents an exceptional opportunity to own a blade from one of the best Shinto swordsmiths 32.000 EUR + PP fee or SEPA payment incl. shipping cost within EU Photos at Hi-Res are available here https://www.zonerama.com/Nihonto/Album/6268825
    12 points
  2. Item No. 120 - Copper tsuba with copper , shibuichi and gold inlays 7.93 cm x 7.18 cm x 0.46 cm Subject of falling Ginko leaves by Ford Hallam 16 years ago. On the carved copper tsuba there are inlays of three different copper alloys and two alloys of shibuichi - the gold highlights applied by fire gilding.
    12 points
  3. All, I was going to wait until everything was formalized, but I thought I would drop the news here anyway. My wife and I are in the initial phases of opening up the Samurai Museum of Lynchburg, VA. The exhibits will feature arms, armor, and other items from the kamakura through the meiji periods. The targeted space is 1800 sqft. If the venture is successful, we will look to expand. I hope you can all stop by at some point! On a side note, I have been watching the sale section closely for lower priced items to round out certain eras and themes. If you have any suggestions please PM me. Finally, I always appreciate and welcome your thoughts, comments and concerns. Sincerely, Dr. James B. McNicholas III
    11 points
  4. Recently come across this online and thought you guys here might like it. It's an advertisement from an old 1934 travel magazine, obviously aimed at the well off tourists of the time. I don't know the exact value in today's terms but i think it would be quite a few years wages for me! Lots of ads for Japanese companies, some with logo's that might interest a few. Hope you guys enjoy it.
    10 points
  5. Thought I would kick off a thread on Horimono on Gunto swords in WW2 mounts. These are all by Kanetoki/Kanemichi (the same sword smith). So I would love to see others, whether Gendai or old blades remounted for war.
    10 points
  6. Thought this was quite interesting.
    9 points
  7. Hi, #2 pic: The title of the Waka poem: 水月(Suigetsu) The moon reflected on the surface of the wate. #1 pic: The Waka poem: 山のすゝき、いづれはゆりて、水の面に、うつれる月の、影の涼しき。 (free translation in English): Japanese pampas grass and the moon reflected on the surface of the water,that feels so nice and cool.
    9 points
  8. Just an idea of the elegant sugata, ubu nakago and nice nagasa of about 485mm.
    8 points
  9. Let me boast a little bit "Nihon No Bi" is an annual exhibition in Moscow devoted first of all to Ikebana and Suibokuga arts. This year it was expanded and included other Japanese arts like kimono, temari, kamono and origami. There was a showcase with three katana as well. I had an opportunity to participate with several tsuba, so I had two small showcases.
    8 points
  10. Finally some good news from Japan! The two blades (a Katana and a Wakizashi/Sun Nobi Tanto) that I had in for Shinsa since June have both passed for Hozon. I have to get some restoration work done on the koshirae of one of them, and also have to get a shirasaya made as it does not have one. So it will probably be a few more months before I actually have them in hand. I don't have a full report on the details of the Shinsa. I only know that they have passed at this time. I suppose that it will take another month or two before the Origami are actually produced. I have never gone through this process before, and really had no idea how long things take to happen. I will be curious to see the results for the Katana especially as it had two sets of older kicho papers. It was judged as Fujishima the first time and judged as Shitahara the second time.
    8 points
  11. This was a gift from Enomoto Sadahito for purchasing one of his fathers blades. A letter opener, all signed. Top dude, he really didnt have to do that but i was chuffed that he did.
    8 points
  12. Don't know if I have put this up before, but it's nice enough to see again, An ICHIMONJI MINAMOTO AMAHIDE KORE KITAERU , no date no stamps, that some officer thought enough about to spend a few extra YEN putting in nice mounts. A tan painted saya, with blue Ito handle wrap, and blackened fittings. It is possible the sarute is gold plated.
    7 points
  13. I had an opportunity to visit my local mentor again last weekend. This is one of the swords he showed me. He recently received it back from Japan where it was papered. I really enjoyed holding this sword and seeing the beauty of it close-up!
    7 points
  14. As a professional writer with 9 WSJ bestsellers, I can confirm that excerpts for review, critique, or education are perfectly okay.
    7 points
  15. Some interesting questions raised by these wax carved and cast menuki shaped objects... There, I've nailed my colours to the post Can we call a CGI designed and printed/cast object that has the outer form of a tsuba a real tsuba? I dont think so. A tsuba, like sushi, pizza, menuki and all sorts of culturally and creatively defined things are recognised as such by their conformity to accepted criteria. Toated dough, melted cheese and a tomato sauce doesn't automatically make the tasty treat a pizza....it may merely be a toasted cheese sandwich, even if you sneak in an anchovy. On a purely functional point menuki were made by means of skilfully manipulating sheet metal for a number of reasons, each significant in terms of what we understand a menuki to be. Sheet work means they're lighter and consume less material, so that choice reflects an awareness of the limits of material resources as well as the need to keep the overall weight of the sword to a minimum for its effective functioning. These are two important and defining aspects of what make menuki menuki. The skill needed to work sheet metal in this way, in such delicate and fine detail was one of the reasons menuki were in fact the most highly regarded of the tosogu when they originally came into use. We do actually value menuki in part because we recognise the remarkable effort their creation entails, finding a more efficient way of producing a similar looking outward appearance is missing a lot of where the value of menuki lies, I think. I don't want to criticise the objects Mario's wife made for him, they're perfectly nicely made objects, in their own right. But, as menuki I find the forms overly 'heavy/chunky'. So while I recognise they are intended to act as menuki, and of course that's Mario's prerogative, and that his wife made them makes them more meaningful to him no doubt, to my thinking they are 'menuki shaped objects, and not objects made to be menuki in the way menuki are and always have been made. I'm not trying to offend anyone's sensibilities by making this post, I'm merely attempting to clarify what I believe would be the reaction of most traditional artisans.
    7 points
  16. We seem to be conflating sword societies and paper. The original question asked about the survival of sword societies and provided a timeframe - in the near future (presumably). However, that is only an assumption, as we do not know whether paper will be phased out in the near term or medium term. Arguably, it is a moot point in the long term. Therefore, we need to go back to basics and focus on whether sword societies will survive. This is a difficult question. Theoretically, they should, as long as the hobby and collecting interests persist. However, an alternative theory is that they become much looser associations of individuals, on a much more federated (as opposed to centralised) and possibly purely, or largely, virtual basis. If people feel sword societies bring benefits (educational, emotional, etc), they should survive as the members will persevere to sustain these organisations. However, if sword societies become irrelevant (through obsolescence of ideas, education, unavailability of study materials etc), then the threat of oblivion is very real. Another stream of analysis, which posters often digress into, is how best to study - with swords in hand, electronically (photos on a website or other repository), by reading books (physical or electronic). Again, this is a different topic entirely and merits its own debate. In my view, study should be multifarious and variegated - physical, electronic, by virtue of passive information absorption (reading/listening) and active participation (kantei, debates). Once, we abstract the method of information provision and internalisation as described above, as long as sword societies provide the avenues for learning or enjoyment, I hope they will survive. As Paul has outlined regarding the U.K. and as far as I know the US NBTHK are also doing, combinations of physical meetings, electronic videoconferences, printed materials, electronic materials, debates etc energise and excite the membership and retain it. in my view, membership retention is one serious challenge. People often sign up but fall away as: personal conflicts arise, member aspirations are not met (these societies are not museums with vast collections and are not universities with dedicated teaching materials and courses; funds are not unlimited; volunteers donate their own free time for others’ benefit; societies cannot provide definitive answers members sometimes seek and definitely cannot shortcut hard work and learning) and sometimes members just join for the wrong reasons. Another challenges are the age and sex factors: middle-aged and ageing males predominate. So, we need to diversify our membership bases by being more inclusive, more pluralistic and democratic in our outreach to prospective members, more tolerant and broad in subjects we cover (tosogu, kodogu, blades, restoration etc). There is much more to say but this is such a vast topic that has often preoccupied my mind. We try to recruit and supplant membership decreases but my observations across several societies are that we are barely maintaining membership. We are not expanding or growing and we just about manage to stay at the same size. Other societies just fold and disappear.
    6 points
  17. Have already posted pics of the mei in another thread, so am opening this one to discuss and show the piece itself. Many months ago, a South African posted pics of a collection of Japanese polearms that he had come across in SA, on a forum. I was immediately blown away, as the chances of finding Japanese polearms here, especially with the original poles, is next to zero. The length itself makes it prohibitive to import. Seems these came to SA around the 1920's or so, by a Dutchman who settled in SA and must have collected various arms. They ended up with a nice young guy called Ruhan. We spoke for months and discussed trading some items possibly, as I have some other items he was interested in. The odd thing is that these items have been sitting in a far away farming area, the equivalent of them rotting away in the barn like I hear from the USA so often. Eventually this week I met up with Ruhan. Granted, the items are in only fair condition. Time and storage has caused surface rust, but of that type that discolors and leaves micro pitting, but the surface is still smooth and will clean up 70% over time with oil and wiping and soaking and some uchiko. Anyways, he had 4 x yari and 2 x naginata. All with VERY long and original poles and in various states of disrepair, but still stable and interesting. Some may remember that my main goal for years has been to get a nice naginata, since I traded my nice one away and miss it terribly. I'm fussy with naginata. Needs to have a nice shape, flowing lines (not that straight edge with a sudden upturn at the end) and most importantly, a well cut hi with that sloped front to the front of the bo hi...some of you will know what I mean. Not the rounded end main hi. Both of Ruhan's naginata had lovely shapes, and the correct hi. But I was captivated by the fact that the one has the hi as part of a horimono. Not a very complicated one, but not one done to cover a flaw either. This starts out expertly as the base of a tree, then goes up and forms the bo-hi, with a side branch of the tree becoming the so-hi...thinner groove. Just beautifully done and planned. The other side has the bo-hi and soe-hi with a varja style horimono inside the thicker groove. Also lovely. And the fittings...? I'll let the pics tell the tale. Just really nicely done. Not sure if that is some sort of mon or whatever, looking for any feedback or opinions on that. But the well done design is on all the fittings. Lots of laquer loss on the pole, but I can live with that. Yes, the pics make the rust look bad, but it's not that bad and will easily polish off by a professional. Cannot feel the texture with a fingernail. Already I can make out a thin hamon about 5cm wide, looks like small gunome or choji. Will see more in the coming months as I wipe and oil. I love this piece. It is missing the tsuba, and will be measuring the gap between 2 seppa to see how thick it was. I also got 2 yari with long poles. One a fukuro yari that is nice, the other more conventional diamond shaped and both with original poles. Anyways, just sharing. Suffice to say, I am a very pleased naginata owner.
    6 points
  18. Dear Joe. Yes, this is a real Japanese tanto. It is in shirasaya, the usual way of keeping a blade when it is out of it's mounts. It is signed Soshu ju Masahiro which is a well known name. However many forgeries exist in that a blade by someone else might well have a famous name added. Soshu swords are highly prized and yours has seen the passing of some years judging by the very much reduced shape just above the nakago or tang. It might easily be several hundred years old. You can compare it to another example here and note the differences. http://sanmei.com/contents/media/A24639_W3214C_PUP_E.html Do nothing to this at the moment except a little light oil and don't clean anything. For what you paid this was an absolute bargain and it might be your introduction to the wonderful world of Japanese swords. Congratulations! All the best.
    6 points
  19. Just a few more pics. I think I'm at a point where it will now have to wait for a professional oneday. But it's all stable. I think these pics came out ok to show how nicely the maker used the horimono to represent the bo hi and soe hi.
    6 points
  20. A descendant of the 9th generation of Zenjo Fjiwara Kanemoto from Noshu Skeki no Magoroku .
    6 points
  21. It's not the script (all the kanji on this tag are still in use today). It's more likely the condition of the tag and the folds and shadows and smudges making it difficult to read. One often hears the "its ancient script" excuse as a way of avoiding the embarassment of not being able to read sword tags - or maybe its a way of saying "this tag is too smudged to read clearly", but they don't want to cause you embarassment. Anyway: One Guntō sword Length: 2 shaku, 2 sun Unsigned (spelled wrong, but understandable) This sword belongs to: Chiba Prefecture, Chōsei-gun, Yatsumi-mura the name is too badly smudged for me to read it, but maybe someone here can decipher it.
    6 points
  22. Forged in 2008. Beautifully forged, demonstrating the amount of skill and control required to create such a hamon on a small kogatana blade. Blade length: 5.25" (13.34. cm) Overall length: 8.06" (20.48 cm) Asking $1350 CAD or best reasonable offer. Prefer EFT, but will accept PayPal + fee. Free Shipping in Canada, all other countries please inquire.
    6 points
  23. Hi Shugyosha, Thank you so much for your reply. I will get those books you mentioned and look forward to learning more. (PS as a gesture of gratitude for the help I have received, I have made a small donation to the forum)
    6 points
  24. John, I feel your view is coming from a guy that valued High Quality Gendaito and their appropriate fittings. "Value", as all of us know in Sword-Collecting-World, is set by the tastes of the group that are interested in each item. I think $650 for a 1963 Spiderman comic book is ludicrous, but I don't have any interest in comic books. I would also never spend $10,000 on a nihonto - I could get 5 great WWII gunto for that!!! You know that some of us enjoy the late-war stuff. You also know, because we at NMB have had this discussion multiple times, the point I'm making about taste. So, what I don't know, is why you're, to all appearances, acting like you don't know all this. ??? Love you, dude, but this is not why we are here. I don't look down on your interests.
    6 points
  25. Hi all, It is wisely said on this forum that one should not invest time and money into building koshirae for every blade in shirasaya that falls in ones lap, for many good reasons. However to my defense the blade came with a good tsunagi when I bought it from a forum member here, this pandemic has ruined enough of my fun lately as it is, and dammit its my money to squander from the rooftops! I put together a set of antique fittings that fit the blade's proportions and had a new saya, tsuka, ito and same done profesionally. I'll post better photos when I have it in hand, still waiting for sageo and origami before its shipped to me. This is my first time composing a koshirae, hopefully my greenhorn tastes are not too much of an eyesore
    6 points
  26. Hi everyone i wanted to start a new thread about this sword I had post d previously Of this sword It had scuffs scratches and a Nick! It is listed 5th seat at the sixth exhibit held in 1941 Because I have been told a sword should be judged by its own merit I thought it was good enough to get be polished by Woody Hall He said it was quite a nice sword so I told to him to have it polished !! I’m glad I did now! I know I won’t get what I put into it but I believed it to be a nice traditional sword now with a good polish that really brought out the hamon!! Woodys comments below Im happy to get feed back!
    6 points
  27. My first post on this forum A excellent condition Officers Shin Gunto Gendaito blade Katana made by Ishido Minamoto Teru Hide in March 1939. The sword has been in a long standing collection for about 50 years until the recent custodian passed away. The sword fittings are in fantastic condition and the days as the brown fish skin covering it also came with a brown mint leather handle cover. The last custodian always called it the Colonels sword but unfortunately there is no paper work to back this up. Gareth
    6 points
  28. Some of you may find these interesting. The metallurgy of the Japanese sword. https://www.esomat.org/articles/esomat/pdf/2009/01/esomat2009_07018.pdf https://www.tf.uni-kiel.de/matwis/amat/iss/kap_b/backbone/rb_6_4.html Best Regards, Corry
    6 points
  29. Fuchi kashira with design of Ink Bamboo
    6 points
  30. Item No. 126 A Tsuba in copper alloy ( sentoku ) with shakudo inlay 8.13 cm x 7.74 cm x 0.36 cm Subject of oak branches , leaves and acorns in the Umetada style by Ford Hallam about 12 years ago. A tribute to the Umetada style with finely worked inlays . This can be seen particularly in the veins of the leaves where they finish in a tapered point ( less than 0.2 of a millimetre wide typically ) - simply a tour de force of inlay work. The blank started to develop ( or reveal ) a few cracks while being forged ( not uncommon with this alloy ) and Ford has chosen to accentuate these with silver instead of trying to hide them . They seem to have no effect on the integrity of the piece itself which rings like a bell when struck.
    6 points
  31. Dear Bob, Item 125 shows Karako Asobi (Chinese Children at Play) which came from the ancient tradition of Chinese art of depicting children playing at four pursuits (painting, chess, harp & calligraphy). This is called kinki shoga in Japanese and was adopted into Japan around the 1400's and became popular in many different types of Japanese art - netsuke, woodblock prints, painting and tosogu. Here's your Kashira with a popular woodblock print (from the 1700's) - you can see that the composition is identical (hat, hair pulling, grabbing the wrist, etc.). As you said, the fuchi has the aftermath with two of the children chasing the other whose chonmage (topknot) has been pulled loose.
    6 points
  32. There is zero chance of ever finding who owned it or returning it. Just make sure your family takes care of it. Potentially a good sword. Fittings are good too. Someone will advise you how to remove the tsuka and see if there's a signature. As for the story of how it was acquired, I suspect the story changed over time, no offense. This is not the sort of sword anyone in WW2 would have been carrying in battle in those fittings. Maybe acquired after the war or in Japan. It's a nice sword and better than most wartime ones would have been.
    6 points
  33. Shijo Kantei cannot compare to studying a blade in hand and I agree that over time you become familiar with the terminology used and what it may imply. However the exercise, at least for me, has proven extremely valuable. Over the years it has helped me to try and focus on what to look for what to expect to see and develop an approach that I hope helps me towards a logical conclusion (but not always). What it cant do is help you identify physical features in a blade that can really only become visible in hand. Until you recognise these, whether a form of hada, the activity in the ji and hamon or whatever it will be a struggle. The lack of opportunities for most people outside of Japan to study really good examples of particular traditions makes this difficult. Shijo kantei is not as good nor a substitute for the real thing. However it is certainly the next best thing and a great learning tool. It helped me and I would strongly recommend any student to use it as the excellent learning tool it is.
    6 points
  34. Hi, Not a date. #1 pic is the smith's age. 七十三翁 means 73 years old man.
    6 points
  35. NBTHK's tatara makes three grades of tamahagane (Grades 1, 2, and 3). The site says Japanese swords are made from Grades 1 and 2. This also repeats the information about the carbon content of the steel, namely Grade 1 is between 1.0% - 1.5% carbon, while Grade 2 is between 0.5 - 1.2% carbon. It doesn't say what happens to Grade 3 tamahagane... maybe Grade 3 ends up in the souvenir shop of the sword museum. https://www.touken-world.jp/tips/19308/ 靖国たたらと日刀保たたらは、それぞれ異なる基準のもと分類されており、靖国たたらでは、「鶴」、「松」、「竹」、「梅」の4段階で品質を分けていました。日刀保たたらでは、「1級品」、「2級品」、「3級品」の3段階で品質が分けられており、作刀の際に用いられるのは1級品や2級品など、最高品質の玉鋼です。 As far as I know, there is no official translation of these grades, so when people like me translate into English, we'll use whatever English translation makes sense. So I have used "Grade 1" for 一級品, but another translator might decide to call this "1A". Note that the predecessor of the Nittōho Tatara was the Yasukuni Tatara, and Yasukuni had 4 grades of tamahagane: Crane, Pine, Bamboo, and Plum. Crane would be the highest grade of tamahagane, while Plum would be the lowest.
    5 points
  36. https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/26909/?bid_lot_no=5500878#/MR0_page=3&MR0_length=10&MR0_category=list&m0=0
    5 points
  37. Item No. 128 - Kozuka in shibuichi with gold and copper details Subject of the sake drinkers ? ( Can't remember their names ) signed Furukawa Genchin. Father of Jochin , he was a student of Yokoya Somin and was the founder of the Furakawa school. Edit - Above information incorrect , transposed with the next piece - this should read: Signed Jowa - nephew of Joi , Nara school. Thanks , George. Lots of fine detailing , with one of the drinkers appearing to be laughing uproariously while the other seems somewhat the worse for wear.
    5 points
  38. Have been keeping my eyes peeled for Sukehira swords and for some reason this only now came up. My mom’s side is Japanese they are Sukehiras. My grandma told me we used to be sword makers. Very cool to see the photos you posted. Hope this message makes it to you!
    5 points
  39. Hello Jon, The NBTHK aren't attributing it to Yoshimasa. Yoshimasa is the name already on the sword. The NBTHK is attributing this smith/sword to the Senjūin group based on the attributes of the sword. Another way of reading the certificate is: "Great looking Senjūin sword. Never heard of this Yoshimasa guy, but by all the evidence in the sword in front of us, he was for sure a Senjūin smith". Does that make sense?
    5 points
  40. 雲州善金作 Unshū Yoshikane saku on the reverse side 守刀 陶山忠司 mamori-gatana Suyama Tadashi Made for (or as a gift for) Suyama Tadashi
    5 points
  41. I am quite delighted that the Museum will exhibit around 25 items from my personal collection. I look forward to seeing the Video when it becomes available. Congratulations Dr. McNicholas and I'm quite sure the Samurai Museum in Lynchburg will please and educate many visitors on the Arts of Japan & The Samurai !
    5 points
  42. Up for sale are four Japanese coins: 1 Gold 2 Bu coin, 1859-1869, 19mmX12mm 2 Silver 1 Bu coins, 1859-1868, 23mmX15mm and 24mmX16mm 1 Silver 1 Shu coin, 1853-1865, 15mmX9mm Selling as a group only. $250 to your door in the US, international shipping will be extra depending on location. Send a PM if you're interested. Wayne
    5 points
  43. https://terebess.hu/gabor/Pitelka-Tea-Taste.pdf
    5 points
  44. Hi All , Sharing a custom sageo that i have received today from Japan . Hand made in Silk to my required width to fit my Tanto saya shito-Dome . Very pleased with the finished item and for those looking for a special or odd sized Sageo i would recommend this store. Very easy to deal with and lots of communication before making and sending. https://kiryudo.co.jp/English.html Some pics of the unwrap , love the attention to detail . Regards Chris NZ
    5 points
  45. You can highlight just a word, or sentence that you want to address and a "Quote" tab appears. Click on that and the selected section of words appear in your "reply" window without quoting the whole post. I use the technique when I see that the guy I want to converse with isn't "Following" the thread. As far as I know, they may never re-visit the discussion. The quote sends them a notice.
    5 points
  46. Beautiful rare Shin Shinto long Katana with Name "Mikazuki Maru" made by Etchu no kuni Takagawa kore o tsukuru Naritomo dated Genji gannen hachigatsu kichijitsu (Aug. 1864Jh)
    5 points
  47. One thing everyone should know is that the NBTHK now posts a translation of the Shijo Kantei on it's website each month and we can now enter our bids electronically right there on the website. Used to be if you had paid for "slow postage" you wouldn't get your magazines in time to submit a bid. Peter makes an excellent point, in Japan shijo kantei is considered second only to hands-on in-person study, now more than ever we should be taking advantage of this great exercise. For those who are interested the NCJSC now offers a zoom kantei class each month and a shijo kantei published monthly in our newsletter. All materials are presented in English and we welcome new members from anywhere in the world. -tch
    5 points
  48. Steve, "big guns" is relative. To me, you are one of our "big guns"!!
    5 points
  49. I offer for sale a well made WW2 sword in '98 mounts, that would impress the most fastidious collector. A (Kojima) KANEMICHI sword in the very scarce Aluminium Saya, with large nodule ray-skin Same under an undamaged wrap. Fittings are all there, matching and nice condition. Being aluminium, the Saya has a few rub marks from war time use, but is above the usual condition found on these. KANEMICHI was a 2 Million Yen swordsmith, and an Army approved and registered RJT smith. Even his SHOWATO swords are of a high-grade standard! And as such, this blade doesn't have a boring plain Suguha Hamon, it displays care and detail in its making. The signature and date on the very nice Nakago, are nicely cut. The blade has no rust, no pits, no chips, no stains. It is from my collection, and is making way for another sword. I can't keep everything, no matter how nice! At only AUD 2700, (thats about USD 2000) express shipped included anywhere. PM me to discuss.
    5 points
  50. 5 points
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