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  1. Thought this was quite interesting.
    9 points
  2. Don't know if I have put this up before, but it's nice enough to see again, An ICHIMONJI MINAMOTO AMAHIDE KORE KITAERU , no date no stamps, that some officer thought enough about to spend a few extra YEN putting in nice mounts. A tan painted saya, with blue Ito handle wrap, and blackened fittings. It is possible the sarute is gold plated.
    7 points
  3. We seem to be conflating sword societies and paper. The original question asked about the survival of sword societies and provided a timeframe - in the near future (presumably). However, that is only an assumption, as we do not know whether paper will be phased out in the near term or medium term. Arguably, it is a moot point in the long term. Therefore, we need to go back to basics and focus on whether sword societies will survive. This is a difficult question. Theoretically, they should, as long as the hobby and collecting interests persist. However, an alternative theory is that they become much looser associations of individuals, on a much more federated (as opposed to centralised) and possibly purely, or largely, virtual basis. If people feel sword societies bring benefits (educational, emotional, etc), they should survive as the members will persevere to sustain these organisations. However, if sword societies become irrelevant (through obsolescence of ideas, education, unavailability of study materials etc), then the threat of oblivion is very real. Another stream of analysis, which posters often digress into, is how best to study - with swords in hand, electronically (photos on a website or other repository), by reading books (physical or electronic). Again, this is a different topic entirely and merits its own debate. In my view, study should be multifarious and variegated - physical, electronic, by virtue of passive information absorption (reading/listening) and active participation (kantei, debates). Once, we abstract the method of information provision and internalisation as described above, as long as sword societies provide the avenues for learning or enjoyment, I hope they will survive. As Paul has outlined regarding the U.K. and as far as I know the US NBTHK are also doing, combinations of physical meetings, electronic videoconferences, printed materials, electronic materials, debates etc energise and excite the membership and retain it. in my view, membership retention is one serious challenge. People often sign up but fall away as: personal conflicts arise, member aspirations are not met (these societies are not museums with vast collections and are not universities with dedicated teaching materials and courses; funds are not unlimited; volunteers donate their own free time for others’ benefit; societies cannot provide definitive answers members sometimes seek and definitely cannot shortcut hard work and learning) and sometimes members just join for the wrong reasons. Another challenges are the age and sex factors: middle-aged and ageing males predominate. So, we need to diversify our membership bases by being more inclusive, more pluralistic and democratic in our outreach to prospective members, more tolerant and broad in subjects we cover (tosogu, kodogu, blades, restoration etc). There is much more to say but this is such a vast topic that has often preoccupied my mind. We try to recruit and supplant membership decreases but my observations across several societies are that we are barely maintaining membership. We are not expanding or growing and we just about manage to stay at the same size. Other societies just fold and disappear.
    6 points
  4. Dear Joe. Yes, this is a real Japanese tanto. It is in shirasaya, the usual way of keeping a blade when it is out of it's mounts. It is signed Soshu ju Masahiro which is a well known name. However many forgeries exist in that a blade by someone else might well have a famous name added. Soshu swords are highly prized and yours has seen the passing of some years judging by the very much reduced shape just above the nakago or tang. It might easily be several hundred years old. You can compare it to another example here and note the differences. http://sanmei.com/contents/media/A24639_W3214C_PUP_E.html Do nothing to this at the moment except a little light oil and don't clean anything. For what you paid this was an absolute bargain and it might be your introduction to the wonderful world of Japanese swords. Congratulations! All the best.
    6 points
  5. Just a few more pics. I think I'm at a point where it will now have to wait for a professional oneday. But it's all stable. I think these pics came out ok to show how nicely the maker used the horimono to represent the bo hi and soe hi.
    6 points
  6. A descendant of the 9th generation of Zenjo Fjiwara Kanemoto from Noshu Skeki no Magoroku .
    6 points
  7. It's not the script (all the kanji on this tag are still in use today). It's more likely the condition of the tag and the folds and shadows and smudges making it difficult to read. One often hears the "its ancient script" excuse as a way of avoiding the embarassment of not being able to read sword tags - or maybe its a way of saying "this tag is too smudged to read clearly", but they don't want to cause you embarassment. Anyway: One Guntō sword Length: 2 shaku, 2 sun Unsigned (spelled wrong, but understandable) This sword belongs to: Chiba Prefecture, Chōsei-gun, Yatsumi-mura the name is too badly smudged for me to read it, but maybe someone here can decipher it.
    6 points
  8. NBTHK's tatara makes three grades of tamahagane (Grades 1, 2, and 3). The site says Japanese swords are made from Grades 1 and 2. This also repeats the information about the carbon content of the steel, namely Grade 1 is between 1.0% - 1.5% carbon, while Grade 2 is between 0.5 - 1.2% carbon. It doesn't say what happens to Grade 3 tamahagane... maybe Grade 3 ends up in the souvenir shop of the sword museum. https://www.touken-world.jp/tips/19308/ 靖国たたらと日刀保たたらは、それぞれ異なる基準のもと分類されており、靖国たたらでは、「鶴」、「松」、「竹」、「梅」の4段階で品質を分けていました。日刀保たたらでは、「1級品」、「2級品」、「3級品」の3段階で品質が分けられており、作刀の際に用いられるのは1級品や2級品など、最高品質の玉鋼です。 As far as I know, there is no official translation of these grades, so when people like me translate into English, we'll use whatever English translation makes sense. So I have used "Grade 1" for 一級品, but another translator might decide to call this "1A". Note that the predecessor of the Nittōho Tatara was the Yasukuni Tatara, and Yasukuni had 4 grades of tamahagane: Crane, Pine, Bamboo, and Plum. Crane would be the highest grade of tamahagane, while Plum would be the lowest.
    5 points
  9. KATO JUMYO made some nice traditionally made Gendai swords. One of mine with the mei, KATO JUMYO, and probably a special order, with a poem by Rai San'Yo . Rough translation ... "Even when you are in the deepest swamp, you are obliged to your country". In '98 mounts. Nice hada and hamon.
    5 points
  10. Dear Mark, Yes, I know all about IVORY. At one time, I owned and operated one of the first and largest HIGH QUALITY FINE ART & ANTIQUE BUSINESSES in the WORLD. My customers ranged from those on a fixed budget ( pay so much a month customers ) to the South Korean Secret Service, The Swiss Secret Service, The US Whitehouse, every major Movie Studio in the World, to virtually every MAJOR MUSEUM in the world. Movie Stars by the truck load. I sold WWII ENGIMA ( army, navy, luftwaffen ). I sold 15th Century Crossbows, Elephant Rifles, Dueling Pistols, Holland & Holland Shotguns, Purdy Shotguns, rare Colts, SOE / OSS / French WWII Resistance Items including Clandestine Radios, War of 1812 Peace Medals, Brownbess Muskets, Indian Trade Muskets. IVORY ESKIMO Artifacts such as dozens of ancient Harpoon Heads, Snow Goggles, HBC Capotes & Blankets, NWC Fur Trade Items from the 1790's, Several fine Ivory Netsuke ( although I rarely sold Japanese Art ( I collected this material for myself ). The ban on IVORY is BULLSHIT, as both China & Japan ignore the ban and buy all they can get. My business came to an abrupt end after 9/11, as it became impossible to ship a lot of what I dealt in INTERNATIONALLY. THERE WERE NO ARAB HIJACKERS by the way. No, ... Mark you can never irritate me so long as you keep your word. I am proud that I gave one Federal Government INSPECTOR a Heart Attack so bad that he never worked again. He had it coming. I am also proud that I never told a lie in my life and I have never cast a vote in my life. The Party System of Government is Corrupt, wastefull, and filled with liars. In my notation on the LISTINGS, .. I state that IVORY will not be sold outside of Canada. Kind regards, ... Ron Watson
    5 points
  11. The stamps are correct and also in the correct order. Rob nearly got it right, but as BangBang has shown, the fuchi cannot be reassembled upside down. If you look carefully, the whole 'SET' of stamps is upside down. Bruce is right, it looks like human error to me too. A picture is worth a thousand words so i got a chance to play with some software and made this up.
    5 points
  12. With way lock set up,it can't be put upside down.
    5 points
  13. Item No. 128 - Kozuka in shibuichi with gold and copper details Subject of the sake drinkers ? ( Can't remember their names ) signed Furukawa Genchin. Father of Jochin , he was a student of Yokoya Somin and was the founder of the Furakawa school. Edit - Above information incorrect , transposed with the next piece - this should read: Signed Jowa - nephew of Joi , Nara school. Thanks , George. Lots of fine detailing , with one of the drinkers appearing to be laughing uproariously while the other seems somewhat the worse for wear.
    5 points
  14. Seki stamp never meant the sword is a non traditional showa-to. The seki (and sho) stamps originated with a sword making guild in Seki as a marketing/quality control technique after lots of cheap swords were breaking in combat. They starting a quality control program that anyone could submit their blades for an inspection and receive the stamp. Once stamped, it was a sign that the blades were good for combat, so it became popular as a way to insure buyers that the sword was good.
    4 points
  15. I am not a patient man, ... as those few who know me and are left on this FORUM will already know ( most who knew me are now dead ). I had several " BUYERS " in response to the listings I posted yesterday and the day before yesterday. I spent from 8:30 AM this morning until 8:30 PM ( this evening ), ... answering Emails, getting shipping quotes, answering emails ( no, I'm not being redundant ), wrapping parcels, filling out CUSTOMS PAPERS for no less than three bloody countries, checking my Email, checking the NMB ( some people cannot read the " contact " information posted with each listing ), checking PayPal ( after a certain time these bastards do not notify one ... when money has been sent ). I can understand customers being a " little slow paying ", ... but when they write and say that PayPal or Wire Transfer will be sent in a few minutes, and I HAVE OTHERS WHO ARE LINED UP TO BUY THE SAME LISTED ITEM, ... THEN PAY ALREADY ! I expect Governments to be lazy, inconsiderate, but as some will KNOW, ... I HATE GOVERNMENTS. The next customer who pisses me off, ... and bingo, the item will go to the next in line or if no one buys, ... then to my son or grandson ! There, ... I'm sure others who are using the NMB to sell items feel the same way as I do, ... however they are too kind to put it into words !
    4 points
  16. Dear Joe. Don't worry, it's all a bit confusing to start with and we often forget what that feels like. Your blade is a tanto, a blade of less than 30cms from the tip,(kissaki), to the notch on the back where the habaki, (blade collar), sits. It is in a form called hira zukuri which means that the sides are almost flat, usually Japanese swords have a shinogi, a ridge line running along the blade on both sides. The tang, (nakago), has a signature, (mei,) which reads, Soshu no ju Mashiro, that means Masahiro, (the smith's name) living in Soshu, (the name of an area in Japan). The blade is in shirasaya, (plain wooden mounts), and has an integral habaki, (we know that one now). Most swords have a separate metal habaki. Kirill mentions a Soshu like hamon, that's the pattern of the hardened edge which you can see clearly on the one in the link. Swords are a bit like wine, they have regional variations and each maker adds their own flavour to the work He also points out that the mei, is quite possibly a forgery. This is known as gimei and is much more common than we would all like. Many people only collect swords in traditional Japanese polish with certificates of authentication. You have a way to go before we start getting into that but as Kirill also suggests the shape and size of your sword indicates that it might have been made sometime around 1550 to 1600. Go slow, enjoy the journey and keep looking! All the best.
    4 points
  17. Have already posted pics of the mei in another thread, so am opening this one to discuss and show the piece itself. Many months ago, a South African posted pics of a collection of Japanese polearms that he had come across in SA, on a forum. I was immediately blown away, as the chances of finding Japanese polearms here, especially with the original poles, is next to zero. The length itself makes it prohibitive to import. Seems these came to SA around the 1920's or so, by a Dutchman who settled in SA and must have collected various arms. They ended up with a nice young guy called Ruhan. We spoke for months and discussed trading some items possibly, as I have some other items he was interested in. The odd thing is that these items have been sitting in a far away farming area, the equivalent of them rotting away in the barn like I hear from the USA so often. Eventually this week I met up with Ruhan. Granted, the items are in only fair condition. Time and storage has caused surface rust, but of that type that discolors and leaves micro pitting, but the surface is still smooth and will clean up 70% over time with oil and wiping and soaking and some uchiko. Anyways, he had 4 x yari and 2 x naginata. All with VERY long and original poles and in various states of disrepair, but still stable and interesting. Some may remember that my main goal for years has been to get a nice naginata, since I traded my nice one away and miss it terribly. I'm fussy with naginata. Needs to have a nice shape, flowing lines (not that straight edge with a sudden upturn at the end) and most importantly, a well cut hi with that sloped front to the front of the bo hi...some of you will know what I mean. Not the rounded end main hi. Both of Ruhan's naginata had lovely shapes, and the correct hi. But I was captivated by the fact that the one has the hi as part of a horimono. Not a very complicated one, but not one done to cover a flaw either. This starts out expertly as the base of a tree, then goes up and forms the bo-hi, with a side branch of the tree becoming the so-hi...thinner groove. Just beautifully done and planned. The other side has the bo-hi and soe-hi with a varja style horimono inside the thicker groove. Also lovely. And the fittings...? I'll let the pics tell the tale. Just really nicely done. Not sure if that is some sort of mon or whatever, looking for any feedback or opinions on that. But the well done design is on all the fittings. Lots of laquer loss on the pole, but I can live with that. Yes, the pics make the rust look bad, but it's not that bad and will easily polish off by a professional. Cannot feel the texture with a fingernail. Already I can make out a thin hamon about 5cm wide, looks like small gunome or choji. Will see more in the coming months as I wipe and oil. I love this piece. It is missing the tsuba, and will be measuring the gap between 2 seppa to see how thick it was. I also got 2 yari with long poles. One a fukuro yari that is nice, the other more conventional diamond shaped and both with original poles. Anyways, just sharing. Suffice to say, I am a very pleased naginata owner.
    4 points
  18. Dear Old Friend, Stephen, ... UPS is VERY expensive in Canada. Hell EVERYTHING is expensive in Canada. Our Postal System is on the rocks, our Medical System is on the rocks, our Transportation System is on the rocks, our Governments ( Federal, Provincial, and Municipal ) are on the rocks ( and have been for years ), our IMMIGRATION System is on the rocks, our Education System is on the rocks ( although still better than American ), our Currency is on the rocks, our Climate is on the rocks, my Sex Life is ( almost on the rocks ... I am 74, so I have an excuse ). Our Judicial System is on the rocks. One can trace ALL this trouble back to one common denominator ( BUREAUCRATS .. paper pushers who produce nothing, and whose sole purpose in life is to make someone else's life DIFFICULT !
    4 points
  19. Thanks all. Grandads original sword was a type 98 in a type 95 scabbard. As a boy i didnt realize that the scabbard was a mismatched NCO scabbard, i only knew that the side latch on the sword didnt mate. I remember it well. The saya on this sword does match. It is not black paint but a dark green over the typical lighter olive green paint. Someone along the way has scratched "JP Ha cc430702" into the blade (electropencil) and scabbard. The scabbard also has the remnants of a heavy masking tape with "430702" still visible. Here is the sword with the Type 38 rifle and bayonet that Grandad gave to my father. Ive fired it and it still holds a good group.
    4 points
  20. Just an idea of the elegant sugata, ubu nakago and nice nagasa of about 485mm.
    4 points
  21. Sharing a post below from Facebook. I know many of us here knew Larry from the community and the US sword shows over the years. My condolences to all here who knew him. It is with a heavy heart that I bring sad news of the passing of a long time collector and friend, Larry Klahn, of La Crosse, WI. I met Larry some 40 years ago. He ran a martial arts school in La Crosse and was with the sheriff's department where he was a SWAT trainer and a member of the tactical team for many years. Larry was familiar to most who attended the regional military and sword shows. He was a passionate collector with many friends in many different spheres. About 15 years ago Larry's health went south and after a long period, he was diagnosed with Lyme's disease. Left untreated for so long, it did a great deal of damage. He recently had a hip replaced after a long wait but came down with covid a week or so ago. Due to his underlying health issues, he lost his last fight. Larry and I had many good times together- we promoted a few sword shows together, we spent time enjoying swords, shooting, trout fishing, eating pizza and as Larry called it, "talking big". As many will attest, Larry was always ready to help and always someone fun to be around. He will be missed greatly by many. As if this isn't sad enough, I have to add one more bit of bad news. ...While Larry was in the hospital, his school/apartment was broken into and he was robbed. The police have caught the person responsible but are trying to reclaim the swords and firearms that the individual stole and sold all over the SW part of the Wisconsin, Iowa and MInnesota. If anyone hears of any recent swords purchases made from a guy with tattoos and a red van, please let me know so I can forward the info to the La Crosse police department. - Chris Bowen
    3 points
  22. I don't think there's a particular purpose or function to the teeth... I've typically seen it described as a snowflake motif, while the two large holes look like a variation on the sea cucumber motif. The sea cucumber with one side as a snowflake shows up fairly often. Here are two of mine, the second one has a single cherry blossom added to the mix.
    3 points
  23. Grey Doffin sells a set of kanji cards. One side shows the kanji and the back shows the translation. It is an easy way to pick up kanji used in signing a sword. You can take a part of the deck with you and study that part when you have time. After a while your mind remembers them. Sword terminology can take longer to learn.
    3 points
  24. I knew that I had seen that motif before. Here is an iron tsuba that I have that is very similar. There is a thi line outlinig the jingasa.
    3 points
  25. This is from "The Art of the Japanese Sword" Grade 1 C 1.31; Si 0.02; Mn 0.01; P 0.017; S 0.003; Ti 0.002; Ni 0.001; Cu 0.01 Grade 2 C 0,77; Si 0.01; Mn 0.01; P 0.022; S 0.004; Ti 0.004; Ni 0 ; Cu <0.01 Grade 3 C 0.31; Si 0.02; Mn 0.004; P 0.021; S 0.007; Ti 0.003; Ni 0.001; Cu 0.01 And this is from Usagiya website. In the furnace, a big iron ingot is produced. It includes various qualities in parts. Then, it is broken into many small pieces. Then, the small pieces are classified into various grades by the terms of hardness and sizes. For example, hard and proper size is highest price, grade 1A (8,250.yen /kg). After it 1B. Some is the too hard (cast iron, 3,300.yen/kg). The steel pieces are classified more grades. And the last pieces are these lowest priced tamahagane. Some people say that this grade of tamahagane is close to the material in Koto period. So some smiths intentionally use this tamahagane. After tamahagane is not homogeneous i think this are all more tendencys then facts for all the sorted pieces. When i have read interviews with different mukansa smiths and they got asked about what the best tamahagane is they all gave different answers. I think every smith has his own experiences and methods and prefer different things.
    3 points
  26. 7.62x7.30 cm - .51 cm rim, .55 cm seppa john twineham
    3 points
  27. The Token Society of Gb publishes between 4 and 6 e-magazines a year for its' members. We started doing this a couple of years ago and it has proven very popular with the members. Covid and the related restrictions caused us to look at using technology and like so many other organisations we started running online meetings which have also proven to be very popular. As we move out of restrictions we have started to arrange physical meetings again. It is our intention to go forward with all these activities to offer the broadest opportunity we can for members to participate and to gain from membership. The cost and time of producing hard copy magazines is prohibitive and I don't see it as a truly viable option for the future. However the use of technology as an addition, not a substitute can only strengthen Societies rather than weaken them. This is a long way of saying the future of societies isn't dependent on paper publications, (or shouldn't be) It depends on participation from like minded people who want to learn more and to help others do the same.
    3 points
  28. John, do not note on many things, read a lot but this school it is a favorite 1. with Akasaka , first buy the Akasaka book then note the following, 2. shape of the seppa , look 1,2 then 3 then the rest 3. Seppa tagana ..the signature if not one 4. the angle of the Kogai Ana ..leaning to the right or not ??? 5. thickness of the mimi 6. the edges of the motif ...Akasaka did many fine edges, age adds corrosion 7. over all flow of the tsuba ... when you noted old , ones on the group understand this vague meaning of Tadamasa to Tadatoki with be nodding there head 8. look at as many Akasaka tsuba as you can even online you will start to see it 8. weight or maybe I should say density in hand being last good luck , great school to study ! Fred Geyer
    3 points
  29. One of the Type 95 from my collection. for those that would like to see it
    3 points
  30. Hello Florida Japanese Sword enthusiasts, Every once and a while a core group of us meets informally to share our treasures, discuss Nihonto, and learn from each other. Saturday, October 23 at 1:00 -4:00 in Vero Beach we'll meet again. I know of a handful of nice swords (Morisuke, Katsumitsu, Kaneshige, Masamitsu..) will be on display as well as some high end iron tsuba and kinko. If you might be interested in attending, please PM me and I can share more details. Best Regards, Mark
    3 points
  31. Michael, Kyushu is a wonderful place. There’s so much European-Japanese history here. I also forgot to add that de Liefde, the ship which William Adams was aboard, washed ashore at Kuroshima, which is an island just off Usuki in Oita. I’ll try to get a couple of cheeky photos for you. Jussi, I’ve attached the lists for the two displays. I agree, koto Bungo-to can be very elegant indeed. A few months back, I was fortunate enough to be permitted to view several early Bungo tachi in a local shrine which were owned by the Otomo clan.
    3 points
  32. It's amazing! After looking at tsuba, somewhat obsessively, for going on 40 years now I was beginning to think perhaps I'd seen most types and designs....and then this pops up And like buses, not just one. It's a brilliant concept, I can just imagine a Samurai putting on his 'drinking tsuba' before going out on the lash on a well earned night off. I need one now, myself. And how about a matching pair of menuki? https://www.aoijapan.com/menuki-mumei-sake-bottle/
    3 points
  33. Simon, I think that is overly harsh. I for one welcome the new organization. I won't let the "antics" of one member cloud my judgement. Let's give them a chance, it's all about education.
    3 points
  34. Hugh, Ah, Hugh .... a feeling of calmness will descend upon me, ... WHEN OTHERS TREAT THEIR OBLIGATIONS IN A TIMELY FASHION. What did I say to deter potential " buyers " ?? I give damn good service, my items are honestly described and carefully packed and expeditiously shipped. I, if asked will give a detailed description of how the item was made, acquired and an honest evaluation. I answer ALL emails quickly and politely. If more people were like me, ... then perhaps the world would not be in the mess we find today !
    3 points
  35. Thank you Thomas. This "scumbag" welcomes you to make use of the forum to promote the society and feel free to post announcements and events as you need. Anything to promote the study of Japanese Arms is well worth supporting. Best of luck with your endeavors
    3 points
  36. Hi. I have been following the evolution of the KNKBSK since its inception. It is a professionally organised group dedication to the preservation of Japanese Armour. They are conducting Shinsa, issuing papers and are approachable either directly or through liaison delegates in different locations around the world. Whilst relatively new they are making inroads internationally and their papers have been accepted by Bonhams and no doubt other organisations and auction houses. As an armour collector I support their business model as I also support the JAS. I would only ask that the moderators of this site oversee posted comments, as slandering or degrading a properly registered, legal entity in Japan does nothing positive for anyone. Time will show success or failure but at this early time in the organisation’s existence I think it fair to give them a chance. Mark
    3 points
  37. Item No. 130 Tsuba in copper with bronze and brass facings , copper , shakudo and gold inlays 7.40cm x 6.90 cm x 0.50 cm Subject of the immortals Chinnan and Chokaro , Pine tree on reverse signed Miboku Masayuki , 18th Cent. Where to start with this ? A depiction of the two Sennin releasing a dragon from an alms bowl and a horse from a gourd . The detailing is not apparent until you study the scene carefully , at many different angles under a light source. From the scales on the dragons back , to the hairs on the horse's mane and tail , the three dimensional modelling of the faces and the patterns on their robes , this is all work carried out with the greatest care . On the reverse , the pine tree is a well known Hamano school characteristic but I have never seen one as good as this. The remnants of spider webs just disturbed by a hint of breeze give a wonderful dynamic to the composition and gold inlays on the trunk of the tree do not betray their presence until viewed in the correct light. The signature is very confidently and clearly incised - it purports to be that of a Big Name - Shozui , the founder of the Hamano School . Can anybody comment on this after reference to Wakayama or Haynes ? The reverse also carries an acquisition number which suggests that it was once part of a large collection. The file photographs flatten out and obscure most of the fine details on this piece - I have attempted to give a flavour of this with some more detailed pictures taken at different angles but , perhaps as it should be , this needs to be examined in hand to fully appreciate.
    3 points
  38. I apologize for not thanking all the responders earlier! My bad; got distracted and forgot (old age) about this post (and the lead up and follow up to SF tokenkai). As atonement, another daisho, put together at that show. Noticed one on a table and realized I had looked at something like it very recently on JAUCE, so picked it up and lucked out on the other. Interesting that the sort of necesary small differences involve one with chisel marks arcing clockwise, the other one has them going counterclockwise. john
    3 points
  39. I have this one, faint but still there, traces of a cut to the mune. A Wakizashi cut down to a long Wakizashi or short Katana.
    3 points
  40. I acquired this at a local arms fair thinking it was essentially a dummy tanto for the tea-ceremony or similar occasion but on getting it home and handling it, it clearly is a kind of club / jitte. It is of a moderately heavy wood, fully lacquered and fitted with vey reasonable quality menuki and saya mount. It seems to be representing an ebi, although it is a bit odd and indeterminate in that quarter. Has anyone seen its like? Ian Bottomley
    3 points
  41. Late Edo aikuchi with mixed metal mounts. Blade is koto with later horimono.
    3 points
  42. Hi George , Sorry ! For some reason I had transposed the information with this piece - Item No. 129 - Kozuka in Shibuichi Subject of Shishi or Lion Dog - clear to see the Yokoya Somin connection. Signed Furakawa Genchin , founder of Furukawa School , father of Jochin.
    3 points
  43. That is an honorable certificate from Army Infantry Major Tahara San’nosuke to an infantry Noma Shimakichi for his excellent result in basic shooting.
    3 points
  44. The joy of collecting nihonto transcends the cost for the most part. I remember the thrill of buying my second blade, a signed out of polish wakizashi, that cost me less than $200. As your collecting advances and your taste and understanding improve, the thrill is still there, whether your budget can take you to pricier and fancier items or not. If your budget is not large, then the game is to go out and find swords that are priced way under their value. If you must, you can then sell them and have a larger budget for your collection. As we see on this board all the time, it is still possible to buy blades for a couple hundred bucks that turn out to be worth thousands. (does anybody remember Georg (?) who picked up a cheap blade at a police auction that turned out to be a world class Kiyomaro, likely worth several hundreds of thousands of dollars? The best tool to unlock this is to study, study, study.
    3 points
  45. Luis, those of us who bid clearly have had our thoughts about these things. Prices are indicative of people having certain expectations. There were some pieces that possibly, with the right restoration in place, could get high papers - not sure about Juyo but at least TH. The problem with all these things is that we are competing against each other, so information sharing cannot be too extensive....
    3 points
  46. It is indeed handmade and recently polished, mumei
    3 points
  47. The sword is a typical commercial sword sold to civilians during this time frame. Civilians wanted "samurai" style swords and not guntō style swords. Many of these swords ended up getting "drafted" [conscripted] into the military at a later date. 寿命十六年
    2 points
  48. Hello Michael, In understand your point that any potential bidder will want to keep a low profile prior of an auction. However I think now since the game is over there ought to be no more competition as everything is set. Of course you are right that the price will often indicate the expectation like some thought it was a Shoshin Masahide while nobody digged into the Muramasa. I was quite frank about what I intended to bid on before the auction as my expectations of winning anything were low - one of the few occasions where I was right Tokubetso Hozon I think is not something we should worry about as it can be acchieved easily as the rules for it are straight forward while Juyo level is totally different cup of tea - and we can of cause only have our more or less educated assumptions whoch I consider however to be both fun and educational.
    2 points
  49. Sharp eyes you have there! copper-handle NCO sword questions
    2 points
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