Jump to content

Spartancrest

Members
  • Posts

    912
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    3

Spartancrest last won the day on January 20 2021

Spartancrest had the most liked content!

Reputation

736 Excellent

4 Followers

About Spartancrest

  • Birthday 04/22/1957

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location:
    Tasmania
  • Interests
    Writing books on tsuba, collecting. Building things and finding novel ways to reuse objects for other purposes.

Profile Fields

  • Name
    Dale

Recent Profile Visitors

705 profile views
  1. Peter it was nice to see the second guard example with a conventionalized lattice barrier or 'Kakine' (垣根), also used to signify sacred places.
  2. Bob. [Glen might be busy?] https://www.bonhams.com/auctions/17816/lot/25/ roughly ten times the price of Yahoo! http://www.connoisseurarms.com/meito.html
  3. Just throwing this little spin of what the vertical 'beams' or bars may also represent. Taken from https://varshavskycollection.com/kamakura-bori-tsuba/ Possible? The Udenuki-ana can also represent water droplets in a design. Once again the original artist is making us speculate and keep guessing - part of the mystique of the art form.
  4. I found Glen's gold highlighted Tengu - it sold back on January the first for ¥ 22,960 or close to $200 US. https://www.jauce.com/auction/s1028555726 It pays some times not to clean out your old watch lists.
  5. Plank bridges - in paintings usually Yatsuhashi 'eight planks'
  6. For Roger. Darn good choice to aspire to! Nice one in the Walters Museum as well.
  7. Mark S. Who or how can anyone define a 'proper' collection? Two tsuba could be called a collection [albeit a small one]. Basing your collection on is probably the most honest and important way to do it. Go for it!
  8. Sorry but can someone explain why this tsuba would be awarded Juyo status when it was made in some numbers - possible Shiiremono, or may even have been made in Sri Lanka?
  9. Michael, where did you find number two? Just noticed it is top row far right, the nakago-ana gives it away. Only two with dimensions which is a pity. [I can't see one being bigger in only one dimension - it may be a typo or bad measurement?]
  10. I would tend to go along with Jean & Curran - try getting someone to make a quality tsuba today, the cost of labour would be prohibitive compared to what you would pay for an antique piece. It would seem that the sheer number of tsuba available does factor into it, there are stories that at the turn of the twentieth century tsuba were sold by the barrel load or for pennies apiece. As collections took off and collectors increased in number, demand started to dictate prices a lot more. But I can also see that many pieces particularly in auctions can sell very cheaply one day and almost identical ones can fetch thousands the next. I have yet to see any real consistency with prices or find the rationale of what makes one more expensive than another based on a like for like comparison.
  11. Hi Pippo, I think the guard was originally made for a practice sword - sometimes called 'dancing sword' Mozoto 模造刀 The background surface is in a very poor imitation of nanako-ji. The 'sekigane' [if you can call it that] is poorly done and lopsided in the nakago-ana. The rendering of the birds is pretty poor - overall not something collectable unless you are into 'retro reproductions'. I think a lot of swords were stripped of their correct fittings and replaced with sometimes more decorative replacements to catch the eye and sell to the novice. I hope the blade is better, tsuba and fittings were designed to be replaced so it is not a big deal to refit with something better. Good Luck.
  12. They are that unique Asian breed "Him-a-layer"
  13. The dimple at the bottom of the seppa-dai would suggest that at the very least three are copies [more likely all four]. Why would you make a 'mistake' four times? Other details are not the same, such as the part of the signature immediately above - would this suggest the signatures were added after the casting or just the die wearing out? Bob, it is nearly impossible to tell authentic pieces in isolation, some copies are just so good. It is only when they start to multiply that they start to stand out - a good visual search of similar pieces will often lead you in the right direction but finding them can take a long time.
  14. If it is convention not to create beauty, then to hell with convention! Great job! [But could you take the images with a less camouflaging background ]
×
×
  • Create New...