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kissakai

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kissakai last won the day on June 8 2021

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About kissakai

  • Birthday 06/06/1950

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  1. For a few weeks I've waited a few day for an email notification 3 days for a post I was watching and 2 days for a PM Prior to this I only waited a few hours for an email notification
  2. Paul Martin told me that when I submitted my Hizen blade
  3. Dan C you made me smile - who doesn't want a shiny badge! I see we only have two non gold tiers members replies and they have had or getting a gold Tier membership so it’s like preaching to the converted Can any non gold tier member say the reasons that whilst selling on the NMB they will not go to a gold tier membership or make a sales contribution. Although early days I’m liking the option for someone to sell say one item a month but I’m sure it’s not an easy thing to set up I have gold tier and contribute to the 5% of my sales but that is my choice. Many of my items are below $200 and as I donate 5% of my sales it would only be a $10 donation, so I wait until I have sold enough to send $50. A few times I’ve had so much help from the NMB I have made a donation. These were for papers translation, mei queries etc. I’m no goody goody I just think it’s worth it to me If a sales donation is made how much should it be? In my opinion it is up to the seller as 5% of $100 is vastly different to 5% of $5,000 Gold Tier membership is vital to the NMB and it’s far better as a regular contribution as this allows the planning to ensure the NMB’s continued development
  4. As I can't edit my post I'll add a bit more here: Brian could give a load of facts and figures about this post but I know he will not wish to part of this post I posted this up as an independent proposal
  5. I checked 10 random items for sale in 2022 excluding Dealers and they had a total sale value of £11,809 – $16,100 There were 2 Gold Tier members and 8 without Gold Tier status I know that some will donate a % of their sales but I expect many do not I’d like to prose that only Gold Tiers members could sell on the NMB Being a member of the NMB I get good views (to date 725 views with 5 sales) of my latest tsuba sales It is not only accessible to so many experts there are the downloads, photo and links etc that are available to me Recently I asked for additional information about one of my tsuba and there was so much help and with the information sent it doubled the value. That was not the reason for my enquiry it was only for my records and FYI this tsuba is not for sale
  6. Nice links and between the two I've combined them into a Tosogu listing I've left the sword info at the end for those interested Kicho Ninteisho Started on 12/09/1948 until May 1982 (Showa 57. Kicho means "precious" and the literal meaning of nintei-sho is recognition in the form of calligraphy. This type of NBTHK paper is commonly called a "white paper". This was the only rank issued until 1950. After that, it was issued as the rank below Tokubetsu Kicho. Tokubetsu Kicho Nintei-sho Started in March 1950 until May of 1982. Tokubetsu Kicho means "especially precious". It was the top rank until the Juyo paper was introduced in May of 1958. This type of NBTHK paper is commonly called a "green paper". The green paper and the round seal bearing the kanji of "Toku" was first used on Tokubetsu Kicho papers starting in July 1950 until 1982. On September 1st, 1973, the Koshu Tokubetsu Kicho paper (blue paper) was introduced and was issued as a rank above Tokubetsu Kicho but below Juyo. Koshu Tokubetsu Kicho Ninteisho Started in Sept 1973 up May of 1982. Koshu Tokubetsu Kicho can be translated to mean "superior of the especially precious". This type of NBTHK origami is commonly called a "blue paper". It was the highest rank below Juyo throughout its use. The Current Shinsa System The current shinsa system began in September 1982 and is in use to this day. The ranking is shown below. Hozon Kanteisho: Lowest level 1) Fittings up to the Edo period with correct mei, or mumei fittings on which the time period and school can be identified, and which are of a certain artistic quality may receive Hozon. 2) Fittings that meet the criteria given above can receive Hozon paper even if they show some wear or are slightly damaged, as long as those may be permissible in their appreciation. 3) Repair is permissible unless it significantly impairs the beauty of the fitting. 4) Fittings made in Meiji times and later which are of good quality and condition. 5) Cast fittings that are of high class and worthy being appreciated can receive Hozon if they do not date later than Edo. 6) Contemporary cast fittings will be rejected. 7) Works of iron that show a minor fire damage or a slightly damaged patina can receive Hozon if these damages do not significantly impair the aesthetic quality of the piece. 8} Fittings are put to "reservation" (horyu) if a decision could not easily be made on the authenticity of the mei. This also applies to mumei fittings in which an attribution is difficult to make. 9) Cast fittings made in Meiji times and later will be rejected. 10) Foreign made fittings cannot be submitted to Shinsa. Tokubetsu Hozon Kanteisho: One level above Hozon Kanteisho Fittings with Hozon papers can receive Tokubetsu Hozon if one of the following points is true: 1) Fittings with good workmanship and state of preservation. 2) Fittings with excellent workmanship and which are in terms of signature and/or workmanship valuable references. 3) Fittings of all periods by not famous artists can receive Tokubetsu Hozon if they can be regarded as among the very best works of the maker and if they are of a certain overall aesthetic quality. 4) Fittings which reflect a preservation of the craft, are extremely well made, and are of a certain overall aesthetic quality. Fittings with Hozon papers cannot receive Tokubetsu Hozon if one of the following points is true: 1) Either zaimei or mumei fittings which show significant repair or remodelling. 2) If they are top grade kinko works but whose surface, motif areas or coloration is so much polished down that the characteristics of age can no longer be judged. 3) If they are of a good quality but the mei is no longer decipherable. Juyo Token Shiteisho: One level above Tokubetsu Hozon Kanteisho and introduced in May 1958. Juyo means "important". Fittings with Tokubetsu Hozon papersmay receive Juyo if one of the following points is true: 1. If of extremely high quality workmanship, of a very high artistic value, and judged as close to Juyo Bijutsuhin. 2. Fittings from all periods with fittings by not famous artists may receive Juyo if these fittings can be regarded as among the very best works of the maker and if they are of an extremely high artistic value. Tokubetsu Juyo Token Shiteisho: The highest level and tarted in December 1971 Tokubetsu Juyo means "especially important". Fittings with Juyo Tosogu papers may receive Tokubetsu Juyo if one of the following points is true: 1. Fittings of excellent quality and superior condition may receive Tokubetsu Juyo if their value is extremely high as art and reference work for our country. 2. Fittings may receive Tokubetsu Juyo if they are judged as the same as the top level Juyo Bijutsuhin or conceivable as equivalent value as Juyo Bunkazai. Common matters for all categories of papers 1) If a kizu or other fault or weakness is discovered during Shinsa which is detrimental to the appreciation, an item may not pass. 2) Works of living artists cannot be submitted for Shinsa. 3) In the case items are submitted with older or lower papers and do not pass an initial or higher Shinsa respectively, they are returned with the remark "genjo" ("returned as submitted") NBTHK Shinsa Standards – Published March of 2006 in the Token Bijutsu, he official publication of the NBTHK. The original document consists of three parts. Token, toso and tosogu. The translation below is of the Sword section only. Hozon Token 1) Edo and earlier blades with correct mei, or mumei blades on which the time period, kuni and group can be identified, may receive Hozon paper. 2) Blades that meet the criteria given above can receive Hozon paper even if they are slightly tired or have kizu, as long as those may be permissible in their appreciation. 3) For Nambokucho and earlier zaimei blades by famous smiths, re-temper can be permissible if the blade is valuable as a reference, and if the jiha and nakago are sufficiently well preserved. However, this has to be documented in the paper. 4) Repair on jiha is permissible, unless it significantly impairs the beauty of the blade. 5) Blades made in Meiji and Taisho periods, and those by recently deceased smiths, can receive Hozon paper only when the blade is well made, zaimei and has a ubu-nakago. 6) Blades are put to "reservation" if a decision could not easily be made on the authenticity of the mei. This also applies to mumei blades in which an attribution is difficult to make. 7) Blades with hagiri may not receive Hozon paper. Tokubetsu Hozon Token 1) Blades with Tokubetsu Kicho, Koshu Tokubetsu Kicho or Hozon papers with good workmanship and state of preservation can receive Tokubetsu Hozon paper, except for the following: a. Either zaimei or mumei blades may not receive Tokubetsu Hozon paper if they are significantly tired, have kizu or repair which impairs beauty of the blade. b. Re-tempered blades may not receive Tokubetsu Hozon paper unless they were made by famous smiths and their values are extremely high as a reference. c. Edo period works by less famous smiths with mid or lower grade workmanship may not receive Tokubetsu Hozon paper. d. Muromachi and Edo period mumei blades may not receive a Tokubetsu Hozon paper, as a rule. However, if a blade shows good workmanship, attributable to a famous smith, having ubu-nakago, and in good preservation, it may receive Tokubetsu Hozon paper. e. Suriage cut-mei Edo blades may not receive Tokubetsu Hozon paper. f. Blades with hagiri may not receive Tokubetsu Hozon paper. * Among blades that received a Hozon paper in item 5 above, that may be considered the maker's best quality, these may receive a Tokubetsu Hozon paper. Juyo Token 1) Blades made in a period from Heian to Edo, having Tokubetsu Kicho, Koshu Tokubetsu Kicho, Hozon or Tokubetsu Hozon papers, of extremely high quality workmanship and state of preservation, and judged as close to Juyo Bijutsuhin, may receive Juyo Token paper. 2) Blades that meet the criteria given above and made in or before Nambokucho may receive Juyo Token paper even if they are mumei. Blades made in Muromachi and Edo periods, as a rule, have to be ubu and zaimei to receive Juyo Token paper. Tokubetsu Juyo Token Among Juyo Token, the ones of excellent quality and superior condition, judged as the same as the top level Juyo Bijutsuhin, or conceivable as equivalent value as Juyo Bunkazai, may receive Tokubetsu Juyo Token paper.
  7. That's a real help. I've abridged this link as below and I'd like o know if I've made any mistakes Kicho Ninteisho Started on 12/09/1948 until May 1982 (Showa 57. Kicho means "precious" and the literal meaning of nintei-sho is recognition in the form of calligraphy. This type of NBTHK paper is commonly called a "white paper". This was the only rank issued until 1950. After that, it was issued as the rank below Tokubetsu Kicho. Tokubetsu Kicho Nintei-sho Started in March 1950 until May of 1982. Tokubetsu Kicho means "especially precious". It was the top rank until the Juyo paper was introduced in May of 1958. This type of NBTHK paper is commonly called a "green paper". The green paper and the round seal bearing the kanji of "Toku" was first used on Tokubetsu Kicho papers starting in July 1950 until 1982. On September 1st, 1973 the Koshu Tokubetsu Kicho paper (blue paper) was introduced and was issued as a rank above Tokubetsu Kicho but below Juyo. Koshu Tokubetsu Kicho Ninteisho Started in Sept 1973 up May of 1982. Koshu Tokubetsu Kicho can be translated to mean "superior of the especially precious". This type of NBTHK origami is commonly called a "blue paper". It was the highest rank below Juyo throughout its use. The Current Shinsa System The current shinsa system began in September 1982 and is in use to this day. The ranking is shown below. Hozon Kanteisho: Lowest level Tokubetsu Hozon Kanteisho: One level above Hozon Kanteisho Juyo Token Shiteisho: One level above Tokubetsu Hozon Kanteisho and ntroduced in May 1958. Juyo means "important". Tokubetsu Juyo Token Shiteisho: The highest level and tarted in December 1971 Tokubetsu Juyo means "especially important". One last question What is the requirement to obtain the Hozon Kanteisho (minimum papers). My guess is that it is authentic but just run of the mill like some of lesser quality Kinai tsuba
  8. I was curious about the Nanban as I have two (293 & T331) Both are kinko which is rare and one has no hitsuana (T331) and in 8 years I've only seen one other Nanban with no hitsuana T293 is so well done especially as every tendril is cut away so it is no touching another tendril In my humble opinion they are two great tsuba I've always called these Namban!
  9. Grey - that was exactly what I was after Now to put it in perspective what was below Tokubetsu Kicho especially as these are described as precious
  10. Interesting points Grey My take on this is that Tokubetsu Kicho was the highest award so some would be Juyo and some not so if you have green papers it may get the higher award Just observations I'm not bigging up my papers with an realistic expectation as neither of mine would get Juyo This post was for opinions so I'll just wait for more comments
  11. John That has re-iterated my thinking I believe the papers associated in the scandal were for sword only as the profit margins could be astronomical whereas much more difficult with tosogu Some of the attributions for the Birmingham tsuba are just silly, just an observation for people thinking museums are perfect. But I digress
  12. I'd go with the clappers Not I'd go like the clappers as that is many years past
  13. I'm not sure which section to post this so please move if required Tokubetsu Kincho Nintei-sho papers commonly called ‘green’ papers and Tokubetsu Kincho means especially precious. These papers pre-date the Jūyō papers we all understand I've often been advised that these old type papers are NO papers but I'm sure that is relevant to swords but not tosogu I have two 'green' papered tsuba and I wonder if the NMB members think they have worth and there standing against Jūyō papers. When I last spoke to Robert Haynes he said he loved the older papers are the judging board were so much more skilled in the earlier years and to be fair we have seen some attributions that don't make sense. I have recent papers for a set of tsuba as Owari Daisho and Haynes said they are at least 150 years apart and one is good and the other is not so good. Papers and there merits have been discussed many times so if we can concentrate on the green vs Jūyō papers Ill be interested in your comments
  14. Interesting - thanks for showing I like to see those Nanban to see what was so special
  15. I would agree with George M
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