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Wakizashi Antique or modern made?


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The photos are rather blurry, but first indication says authentic, but in poor condition. Can you get us some clearer photos of the whole blade and the saya (scabbard)?

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Acxel,

photos are upside-down and not much better, but I am convinced that it is an authentic, traditionally made blade of the SAMURAI era. The downside is that it will need a lot of competent (no DIY !) work to preserve it for future generations which is costly. In case this one is offered cheaply, there is a reason for it.

The shape (SHOBU-ZUKURI) is quite nice as far as one can see, but no details of possible defects (cracks, blisters, a.s.o.) are visible. 

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It would seem to me that Acxel has stumbled upon a horidashimono that is well worth professional evaluation.  Looking forward to more revelations.

 

BaZZa.

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Morning Acxel,

I agree; this might be interesting.  It needs to be seen in hand by someone who knows what he's looking at and who is honest (not going to guess which of the 2 is in shorter supply).  As mentioned, don't try to fix anything yourself (well meaning amateurs can do serious damage) with one exception.  If there is no pin to fit through the hole in the handle and blade's tang, whittle one out of a chopstick ASAP.  The pin (mekugi) is very important; the blade is dangerous and subject to fatal damage itself if there is no pin to lock it in the handle.

Best,  Grey

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Where do you live? Impossible to speculate on value at this point. A polisher could open a “window” that might provide much more insight into how you should proceed. 
 

You should also get the sayagaki (writing on the scabbard) translated. It looks extensive, but with better photos someone here might be able to help. 

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Hi Acxel,

In spite of what everyone is telling you, resist the urge to jump into restoration.  1st you need to have a better idea what you have and what all your options are.  The sword can always be restored and nothing terrible will happen to it if it isn't restored soon.  The more you know before you have restoration done, including whether or not the sword should be restored, the more successful the effort will be when you do it.  There may be a Japanese sword show in Schaumburg (near you) the end of April (depends on the virus situation); if so it would be an excellent opportunity to have the sword looked at.  If it doesn't happen there are other options.  In the mean time, take it slow; don't be in a hurry.

I'm not too far away in Minnesota.  I'm not an authority but I know more than you do about this.  Feel free to call with questions; glad to help if I can.

Cheers,  Grey  218-726-0395

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Hi John, Not sure where in Chicago (big city) you are located, but usually there is a Chicago Sword Show every year in Schaumburg. It's a great place to get advice on the blade. Usually Mr Bob Benson is there who is one of the few qualified U.S. polisher's. As of right now, the show is on for April 30 to May 2. Go here for more info: http://www.chicagoswordshow.com/ Mark

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Acxel   or Mr Acxel  ?  sorry not sure how to address the message......... I run the Chicago  show, i am hoping to have the show April 30 - May 2 as long as IL allows events by then.  I travel through Chicago occasionally and might be that way in a week or so. If you are available to meet as i drive through let me know. Or if you can come to the show there will be people there i can direct you to that might help..  you can reach me at nixe@bright.net

 

Mark Jones

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Hello everyone,. Thank you again for all the information.  It's much appreciated.  I did reach out to Mr. Benson.  I thought I'd share his thoughts on this wakizashi.

 

Dear Axel,
        Your wakizashi looks to be a late Muromachi period sword. As a koto mumei it
Looks to be unaltered. I would say it is not a Hosho sword but would need to examine it
first. Blades in this shape are desireable from the Muromachi era but even more so if earlier. Hosho swords are from early to mid Nambokucho and yours appears to be from many years later. Do you still want it polished? 
Robert Benson

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1 hour ago, Axel123 said:

Just curious if anyone would have an estimate of when this might've been made.


If Mr. Benson says its late Muromachi period then it probably dates from the mid to late 1500s.

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I’d send it to Bob and see what he thinks from having it in hand. He’ll let you know if he thinks it’s worth it to polish or not. He’s honest and will give you the very best advice. He’s one of the very first people I had contact with when I started collecting and he’s helped so many times since, I can’t count them.  

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