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Goto Ichijo Tsuba Opinion Wanted


Timur
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Also I matched against all the Juyo and I did not see this kao. Goto Ichijo changed his name two times.

 

There is Goto Mitsuyo. Ichijo. And then Hakuo (almost all tsuba).

 

I don't see this kao anywhere. I am though eating chips with one hand in bed with the computer waiting to fall asleep. But find that kao where it is acceptable and that will back or break your opinion.

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  • 2 years later...

Textbook example of Ichijo during his "Warhol" period, as famous as he is I don''t feel he gets the full measure of respect he deserves. His work ranges from meticulous micro detail to conceptual  "serial" art, a varied and facinating career.  Fine piece Valery...Well done!

 

-S-

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Most excellent!  :clap:

 

I respect the opinions here that most such items should be papered, if being sold by a dealer.

Yet things DO just come out of the woodwork, unpapered.

 

One of the other commenters in this thread has several times now pulled big name piece out of the pile and gone on to paper them.

It looks like Valery is very adept at it too.

 

It can be dangerous.

Own the books and build up your confidence level.

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Great news!! Reread but missed where it was repatinaed...would you tell what im missing?

Stephen, no repatination involved. Just the first photos were from the seller - the tsuba had silver look, but it was just a trick of shakudo getting light from different angles.

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Congratulations.  

 

There is a lesson to be learned here for both new and old.  There are big, and small name legitimate pieces from Japan (aren't they all) which do not have papers.  Simply coming out of Japan or from a dealer without papers is no guarantee one way or the other of their legitimacy.  Of course not all are legitimate, but for people to make such broad, sweeping claims is preposterous.  This tsuba is in your face proof.

 

It frustrates me every time I hear someone say with such intransigent authority, "If it is a big name and no papers it is gimei", or "If it came out of Japan and doesn't have papers, it's gimei", "it it is from a dealer and has no papers, it's gimei", or "Big name, no papers = no sale".

 

I have brought many un-papered swords and fittings from Japan, which later went on to receive various levels of papers, from Hozon to Juyo.

 

It has been my experience that there is only one rule for this hobby that is set in stone, and that is "nothing is set in stone".  

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  • 2 years later...

Hi Tony

 

The patterns are stamped into the tsuba ground. Not sure what the story might be but there was in the little woodblock book published in 1832 that illustrated the varieties of snowflake patterns. Sekkazusetsu or 'Illustrations of snow flowers' was a record made by a Daimyo (Doi Toshitsura, Daimyo of Hitachi Province), he'd imported a microscope from Holland and spent 20 years sitting in the snow in winter studying snowflakes and recording their shapes. Snowflakes had not been seen so clearly before and their beauty and novelty made them and immediate hit with designers and the culturally trendy of the urban centres.

 

 

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On 11/2/2020 at 3:49 AM, Ford Hallam said:

Hi Tony

 

The patterns are stamped into the tsuba ground. Not sure what the story might be but there was in the little woodblock book published in 1832 that illustrated the varieties of snowflake patterns. Sekkazusetsu or 'Illustrations of snow flowers' was a record made by a Daimyo (Doi Toshitsura, Daimyo of Hitachi Province), he'd imported a microscope from Holland and spent 20 years sitting in the snow in winter studying snowflakes and recording their shapes. Snowflakes had not been seen so clearly before and their beauty and novelty made them and immediate hit with designers and the culturally trendy of the urban centres.

 

 


Aww, thanks Ford. That makes a lot of sense and I was wondering if these tsubas had any relation to Doi Toshitsura. 

I remember that example Matt! I especially like yours since the snowflake stamps are imprinted on gold inlay. 

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