Jump to content

Gakusee

Gold Tier
  • Content Count

    817
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    9

Gakusee last won the day on April 18 2019

Gakusee had the most liked content!

Community Reputation

830 Excellent

About Gakusee

  • Rank
    Jo Jo Saku

Profile Information

  • Gender
    Male
  • Location:
    UK
  • Interests
    Koto swords in order of personal preference: Bizen, Soshu, Yamashiro

Profile Fields

  • Name
    Michael S

Recent Profile Visitors

321 profile views
  1. I also think the blade is in a very good condition. Rob, sorry but I cannot opine on the koshirae here and how old it is. Kirill, in a separate post about your kazari tachi, was opining on the size and colour of the gold flecks. Not sure to what extent those statements are borne out by fact and study. However, I have heard elsewhere, too, that the gold used more recently is indeed brighter and yellower as opposed to more tinted in the past. However, one need not forget that the lacquer layers on top also affect the colour. it could be that the koshirae was made to order for the imperial gift and is this only 100 years old or it could be it is 250 years old. Indeed one would need to examine properly the nanako, the gilding, the gold flakes etc etc.
  2. Alex, let me offer some words of encouragement. You posted the sword a little over a month ago. Well, in reality it takes months to sell something, unless it is something that people are proactively looking for. Dealers have stock sitting around for months and sometimes years before they discount an item or sell it. So, do not despair and bear in mind that most people shopping in this category of sword / price level, have usually also been affected by Covid-19 and might not have the immediately available funds. People who are not so affected or do not have financial worries - well they, might shop in “other categories”. So, give it a chance and take it easy.
  3. Signature, patina etc looks consistent with age and broadly workmanship. Amazing how he did such suguha for a Bizen Smith (I know some of the Oei guys did it but prefer the koshi no hiraita midare hamon of Oei).
  4. Sorry, cannot open the image bank on my iPhone but did you receive photos of documentation proving the provenance and the boxes in which it was kept or presented?
  5. Adam, if the blade papers with one of the shinsa and they put the nakago in a photo, then it is fraudulent to reinsert it after receiving the certificate without a mei. Of course you can keep the mei as a souvenir but not reattach it after it has papered. There are swords that have had mei removed and have papered. I can think of at least one. But in that case someone had made an effort to redecorate the nakago a bit, even though it was still barely visible where an orikaeshi or gakumei (cannot remember which one) had been. The problem here is that you have received advice from the board (there are knowledgable people here, but not “experts” in the true sense). If Paul has seen it in hand, it is different. But even he cannot give a fully qualified opinion via photos. The blade has not been to any shinsa and, I am sorry, but to me, only they alongside Tanobe sensei are “experts”. Yes, it would have been a “waste” of £150-200 If it failed die to gimei. but this is not a cheap hobby.
  6. Guys, can’t you see the mei has already been removed. No point crying over split milk. Too late for advice
  7. Adam, why would you go and remove the Bishu Munemitsu orikaeshi yourself?!?!?! You should have just sent it to Paul Martin, as you planned to, get it through Hozon Shinsa (or fail it, but Paul could get comments from the Shinsa Panel as to why it failed) and only if it fails because gimei, could you consider having it done by a professional in Japan...... Frankly, disappointing.....
  8. Well, there was one with kinpun “ichi” on the nakago, but the kinpun mei was poor
  9. Mine you mean? Mine is here .... Tokubetsu Hozon at the moment.
  10. Funny... I have a tachi koshirae just like that (almost identical). The koshirae itself (if genuine Edo) is worth more than the total amount being asked for the package.
  11. The reality is there are so many polishers in Japan.... Saito san, Abe san, Mishina san, Fujishiro san, Honami, Dodo san, etc - all mukansa. Then you have their deshi. Sasaki san is another mukansa with top work. Ikeda san, Mizuta san, Usuki san, Tsuyoshi san, etc etc etc the list goes on and on. Paul Martin has access to many Japanese polishers - he facilitated a sword of mine being polished by Ono san. Why don’t you ask him? I have had a different sword polished by Dodo san. I have had one by Sei san.. They were all good. Admittedly none of those was hitatsura. Ted is one of the best choices outside of Japan, but he is in the US.
  12. You mean Iida Kazuo’s Shin Nihonto No Kantei Nyumon translated by Afu? If so, do you have the original Japanese text?
  13. Tanobe sensei indeed could now write sayagaki even for an unpapered sword or Hozon or TH. But he indeed is selective and the submitter also needs to be “self-selective” and not “embarrass” Tanobe sensei by requesting a sayagaki for a bad sword etc. The older or the more interesting the sword the better. Also, how much he liked or appreciated the sword is also evident by the length of the sayagaki and the floridness of the language used. Tanobe sensei could evaluate a signature, the state of the nakago (age, rust, etc), the overall blade and could concurrently recommend a polisher best suited to restoring it. Then he might say that he would study it and write a sayagaki after the blade comes back from polish. Paul is not the best suited to commission to intermediate that. One is better off requesting a local Japanese dealer or intermediary for that.
  14. Tanobe sensei indeed could now write sayagaki even for an unpapered sword or Hozon or TH. But he indeed is selective and the submitter also needs to be “self-selective” and not “embarrass” Tanobe sensei by requesting a sayagaki for a bad sword etc. The older or the more interesting the sword the better. Also, how much he liked or appreciated the sword is also evident by the length of the sayagaki and the floridness of the language used. Tanobe sensei could evaluate a signature, the state of the nakago (age, rust, etc), the overall blade and could concurrently recommend a polisher best suited to restoring it. Then he might say that he would study it and write a sayagaki after the blade comes back from polish. Paul is not the best suited to commission to intermediate that. One is better off requesting a local Japanese dealer or intermediary for that.
  15. Get in touch with Daniella Dangoor.
×
×
  • Create New...