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For Those Using Gun Specific Oils On Nihonto


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This is a *very* indepth and informative thread on just how different lubricants, gun oils and other similar products perform for protecting metals. Worth a read and compare with your own experiences using some on swords.

 

https://www.shootersforum.com/gun-cleaning/91566-results-gun-care-product-evaluation.html

 

I thought the staining and corrosive tests were particularly relevant due to the different and delicate materials found in Japanese swords. Some of the more aggressive gun cleaning products and oils are good for cleaning martial arts swords but none of us would dream of using them on Nihonto.

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The problem with tests is to reproduce the real conditions. Derek did a great job, but mild steel has a very different 'behaviour' than low alloy carbon steel as far as corrosion is concerned. Carbon steel is quite easily attacked by rust, mild steel not so much. 

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Yes, that is one of the properties of very pure iron. It is not so exposed  to the risk of corrosion. But there are also modern iron alloys with similar properties (e.g. CORTEN steel). These metals produce a (protective) superficial layer of rust, but the process stops by itself. We can see this quite often on regularly used items like handrails.

In Japanese metal craftsmanship we have SABIJI, an artificially induced, protective layer of iron oxides.  

Corrosion processes may be influenced by changing environmental conditions, e.g. pollution/acid rain.

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I'd love to see the eggheads and boffins down at the labs cook up a scientifically formulated and specially designed protective product just for Nihonto. The market is there, especially for museum and high grade collections.

 

I believe most museums, at least those which don't specialize in Nihonto displays but still have weapon collections use Renaissance Wax to protect them because it is so long lasting and low maintenance. I couldn't see most museum staff religiously oiling their swords like a serious private collector.

 

Personally every six months I reapply the highest grade gun oil I'm aware of, Wilson Combat Ultima Lube in the lightest viscosity they offer. Definitely never any off the shelf Wal-Mart stuff.

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I'd love to see the eggheads and boffins down at the labs cook up a scientifically formulated and specially designed protective product just for Nihonto. The market is there, especially for museum and high grade collections.

How about a cyanobacteria produced oil derived from sunlight and waste CO2 gas for a high quality sword oil with no acidity?

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This thread is quite old. Please consider starting a new thread rather than reviving this one, unless your post is really relevant and adds to the topic..

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