Jump to content

Bazza

Gold Tier
  • Posts

    2,007
  • Joined

  • Last visited

  • Days Won

    24

Everything posted by Bazza

  1. Nice condition and patina. It certainly doesn't appear to have ever been brassoed (polished/cleaned) and here I find myself on the 'manhole cover' side... BaZZa.
  2. Johan, What we are seeing here are rust pits and kizu (flaws) of a sort called tateware (forging flaws along the grain). Furthermore the whiteish banded appearance is most likely shintetsu (core steel) showing through the kawagane (skin steel) either through over-polishing or poor quality forging. It would be helpful in this regard if you could present a photo of the tang taken directly above the back and including the munemachi (back notch). BaZZa.
  3. Gents, I have just "tuned in" to this thread for the first time and felt quite wistful that my very brief armour collecting days are long past. This post is quite unrelated to armour in general, but quite specific to the mon shown in Post #24 and Post #29. Some ten years ago I briefly had in my possession a friend's wakizashi and it was sufficiently interesting that I photographed it. FWIW and FYI the mon does appear to be identical to that in the above posts and I attach them here. Best regards, BaZZa. aka Barry Thomas Melbourne Australia
  4. micah, with all due respects, it is a noble pursuit to try and fully understand what a particular sword is, but in this case I truly think it is a lost cause and not worth the intellectual agony. I have been down the same road decades ago when I was trying to understand Nihonto, so I appreciate your "need to know"... But (there is always a 'but') might I suggest you keep this sword for what you can see in it and get thee along to a sword collector's show or meeting and get to grips with what good swords in good condition look like. There are many rocks in the road to appreciating Nihonto and this is one of them. An anecdote from my distant past may be helpful. I once saw a sword in another collection and desired it, but kept my feeling to myself. A few years later I looked at it again and said to myself "What on earth did I ever see in that sword??!!" So, if you decide to keep this sword put it away in the back of a cupboard and look at it again in a few years. Come back here and tell us your feeling. Most of us will still be here... BaZZa.
  5. Johan, Shinano no Kami Fujiwara Rai Nobuyoshi is a "big name", so we really do need to see good photos of the full tang both sides. On the blade photo above, to me, I opine that this blade is not a genuine work of Rai Nobuyoshi. Best regards, BaZZa aka Barry Thomas.
  6. Bruce, Bruce - wherefore art thou??? BaZZa.
  7. I've hesitated because the pics are somewhat low res. I have two Nobuyoshi katana, one Hozon, the other Tokuho. My 'thought' about this one is that the tsuba is a dud and the fuchi shown a modern repro, which to me suggests a 're-dressed' blade for sale. I have no confidence in the blade signature at all - it looks 'wonky' and 'insubstantial'. Simply collectable as Peter says - if its genuine. I would need to have it in hand before acting on it. BaZZa.
  8. Might it be a famous view??? BaZZa.
  9. Piers wrote: > Sanju Makibari Piers, Surely it is niju?? The only sanju gun I have ever seen was HUGE and weighed as much as an anchor!!! BaZZa.
  10. The real litmus test is how long "new guys" last in the pursuit. Nihonto is a tough gig from front to back and top to bottom!! BaZZa.
  11. Thank you very much Piers and Marcos. My friend was grateful for your opinions (I pointed him here, hopefully as a teppou man he will stay around ). He replied: > Also, thank you for the information regarding the mon on my kozuka. I have seen most of the Nabeshima > style mon and think that the mon on the kozuka is sufficiently different to be a different mon. BaZZa.
  12. A friend of mine has a kozuka and thinks the mon may have been a sideline variation of the main Nabeshima family mon, but he has been unable to identify it. My knowledge of mon is pretty much zilch. Does anyone have any idea of what it could be?? Thanks, BaZZa.
  13. Gents, If the hamon is intact and true to the cutting edge before the hamachi this isn't necessarily a sign of a retemper. Though uncommon such a real temper exists and it is called yakiotoshi. http://www.ksky.ne.jp/~sumie99/yakiotoshi.html https://www.metmuseum.org/art/collection/search/645991 Also, put yakiotoshi into the NMB search window for more on the Board. BaZZa.
  14. I'm very interested to see that the tsuba has a teppou on it, though I can't make out the object that is in front of the barrel or what the other objects are. I'm guessing that the back of the tsuba might show a bag for keeping lead balls. On the front I seem to remember a story here some time ago of a samurai shooting a bird in some circumstance?? BaZZa.
  15. Does anyone know when this type of kake (stand) came into being. I'm guessing Meiji period??? A friend has just found one and while I was aware of the style had never seen one (that I can remember) in hand. There are numerous around on the internet and I've attached a photo of a signed example found there. This one my friend has found isn't signed, but looks old and the wood seems to be cypress, or certainly a pine of some sort. BaZZa.
  16. Oh, Peter, I've been following this with very great interest indeed. I didn't know you had such a collection of teppo. Nice photo. The bottom gun is the one in question, desu ne? The one for which you are looking for a hibasami? I recently saw a teppo that had a homemade pan cover. God it looked awful The next two guns up on the rack are conversions to percussion and a bolt action? Very interested to see a write up on the bolt action. One reads that this was done, but I don't recall seeing one described on the Board. Keep up the good work!! BaZZa.
  17. Some while ago Stephen put up a link to Ford discussing restoration of a tetsu same tsuka from a katana. This link shows Ford discussing restoration of a wakizashi koshirae: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=X0yk24gfjWg In the beginning he also revisits the tetsu same tsuka to show results of the conservation of this item. BaZZa.
  18. These sorts of threads are endlessly circular discourses! John, you really have to get away from google and actually hold swords in your hand. Find a sword club, or two, or three near you and get hands on experience. Spend more time looking at swords before even thinking about buying a sword, even years. The inevitability of sword collecting is after you gain more knowledge and appreciation you will say "Why did I ever think that was a good sword to buy!!" The other thing is to get away from the idea that swords are an "investment". Wrong mindset IMHO. Oh, and never spend money that you can't afford to lose outright is a good guide to buying... BaZZa. (Still "at it" after 55 years...)
  19. I reckon it has all the hallmarks of a fake... BaZZa.
  20. It would seem to me that Acxel has stumbled upon a horidashimono that is well worth professional evaluation. Looking forward to more revelations. BaZZa.
  21. I've been back and forward over this sword for quite some time. This certainly isn't Daimyo stuff, but has a sort of "reserved dignity" about it. Stretching my neck out here - does anybody think the saya could conceivably be 17th century lacquer???? Possibly the original koshirae for a Shinto blade?? The tsuba looks like the lacquer and the tsuka, simple and old. The handle binding is in an unusual style but appears undisturbed and old. I think the blade is Shinto, but that chip is a real killer. I would have a window put in it. Just thinking out loud - swish??? BaZZa.
  22. Congratulations Jeremiah, thanks for sharing. BaZZa.
  23. Hello and welcome Kevin. To give another perspective of a Japanese sword collector I have been on the Forum since 2008 and have been collecting for 55 years... I hope you will enjoy our company for a long, long time to come. I have a simple question - why Dotanuki??? I have an answer, but I would like to hear yours. Best regards, Barry Thomas aka BaZZa.
  24. Jumping in as the thoughts occur to me. Any Yasunori I've ever seen (a few! And I owned one at one time) are suguha and all about 25 - 26 inches long. Oh, and only one mekugi ana. Longer blades may be special order, but this certainly isn't one. BaZZa.
×
×
  • Create New...