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Tsuba-Specific Juyo Index (data sourced from Juyo 1-66 originally compiled by Jussi Eckholm)


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Enjoy...

There were some surprises for me, including a bunch of mumei tsuba, and even 3 Nanban!

There was a lot of late Edo kinko smiths that I had never even heard of, but that's not much of a surprise since I've been focused on iron tsuba so far.

 

I tried to bundle specific smiths into a grand total for the specific school they belonged to.

It's possible that the grand total for a specific school could be off by 1 or two... but hey, I did what I could, and it'll have to be "close enough" :).

Also, I may have wrongly left a few smiths as "independents" because I didn't do "extra research" to see if they were part of some larger school or lineage of smiths.

 

Ok, enough caveats... at least it's a start. 

Tsuba-Specific Juyo Index Sorted by Alpha.pdf

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Me too Grev, I'd love to see those ones.

However, I do think there are some fantastic Nanban tsuba out there, but there's just so many crappy mass-produced knock-offs that it taints the whole group.

I supposed it's the same with just about every design trend: becoming too popular is its own demise.

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Michael, where did you find number two?

boxer and rijksmuseum namban comp small.jpg

 

Just noticed it is top row far right, the nakago-ana gives it away. Only two with dimensions which is a pity. [I can't see one being bigger in only one dimension - it may be a typo or bad measurement?] 

Edited by Spartancrest
closer look
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Is there something that I am missing about "namban' tsuba ?

I really like and am impressed with those 'detailed' examples with the twisting vines or tendrils that go over and under each other, sawn, chiseled or filed to separate and shape each vine, dragon etc . A lot of tedious work involved from the days of hand-made hand tools only, no gas torches, no 'dremel' type drills or cutters- to create these small monuments to those old craftsmen whose names will only rarely be known to us.

Amen.

My take on these pieces which sometimes can be not highly priced

Roger j

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1 hour ago, roger dundas said:

Is there something that I am missing about "namban' tsuba ?

I really like and am impressed with those 'detailed' examples with the twisting vines or tendrils that go over and under each other, sawn, chiseled or filed to separate and shape each vine, dragon etc . A lot of tedious work involved from the days of hand-made hand tools only, no gas torches, no 'dremel' type drills or cutters- to create these small monuments to those old craftsmen whose names will only rarely be known to us.

Amen.

My take on these pieces which sometimes can be not highly priced

Roger j

 

"Nanban tsuba" literally "Southern barbarian sword-guards" is a catch-all for tsuba that show foreign influence.

 

I would assume they're much rarer at Juyo level as they're much less likely to be culturally significant to Japan.

 

As with Nihonto; history, traditions, schools, makers, development, etc are all important factors.

 

For a nanban tsuba to present all of these factors to such a level that the NBTHK determined the preservation of the tsuba to be of historical importance (for Japan) is quite unexpected and unusual.

 

That's not to say that they aren't exceptional pieces of work, along with many other nanban tsuba, just that other tsuba would seem to have an advantage when it comes to receiving Juyo papers.

 

Clearly the examples here are truly exceptional, given that they were awarded Juyo papers.

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53 minutes ago, Spartancrest said:

Sorry but can someone explain why this tsuba would be awarded Juyo status when it was made in some numbers - possible Shiiremono, or may even have been made in Sri Lanka?

 

 

I can't.   To add to the complexity of this art or hobby interest, the difficulty of passing Juyo has changed over the years.

 

--There are some Juyo that I think would barely pass TH.

Conversely, there are some tsuba that would barely make Tokubetsu Hozon these days that are Juyo.

 

Omissions like why no Juyo Saotome?  There are a few incredible ones, but I've been told "There are no Juyo ones, so the NTBHK won't make any Juyo"

And so on.

 

Incredible work by Jussi.

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Awesome job Glen. As tsuba and other fittings are not my forte, if you guys find any errors you can message me and I will correct it for the next update.

 

I was trying to look into the Nanban tsuba that is being discussed, unfortunately I can't get the text typed in today and trying to figure it out. It has been attributed to Momoyama period by NBTHK. The size of it is 7,4 cm X 7,3 cm.

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I was curious about the Nanban as I have two (293 & T331)

Both are kinko which is rare and one has no hitsuana (T331) and in 8 years I've only seen one other Nanban with no hitsuana

T293 is so well done especially as every tendril is cut away so it is no touching another tendril

In my humble opinion they are two great tsuba

I've always called these Namban!

 

 

 

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