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dwmc

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Everything posted by dwmc

  1. Well, I must say, I've been curious as to when this Type 94 Shin-gunto show down was going to eventually occur. You guys should all feel ashamed by this overt and flagrant braggartry of beautiful swords in 94 korshirae, making many of the rest of us with a mere 15 or 20 non Type 94 swords feel badly...☹️ Though, very much kidding Gentlemen, all seriously beautiful swords. I'm beginning to think Mr. Neal (IJASWORDS) is absolute king of Australian Gunto . What, 25-30 in that one display case... All very nice indeed ! Just envious, Dave M.
  2. dwmc

    2nd Menuki Question??

    Thank you guys, I had no idea there were male and female dragon menuki. I've been a nihonto enthusiast for many years and have (obviously) not paid enough attention to menuki. I now see that menuki are a further and fascinating facet of nihonto to study.! I've decided to use my dragon menuki for the tsuka, and will be contacting David McDonald soon for restoration. Again, information very much appreciated. Best regards, Dave M.
  3. dwmc

    2nd Menuki Question??

    Thank you for the information ! Dave M.
  4. dwmc

    2nd Menuki Question??

    Thank you again Jean. Your opinion is greatly appreciated ! Best regards, Dave M.
  5. Dear Members, Thank you again Jean for your quick response. These two sets of menuki below are my 2nd and third choice for tsuka restoration. The dragon menuki, I know are edo period, but just noticed they are actually a miss matched set, they were however on same deteriorated Shinto era tsuka. The Sakura menuki (appear) to be an older set, but would appreciate an opinion if this actually is the case. If there is any doubt as to the Sakura menuki not being at least Shin Shinto, I will use the miss matched dragon menuki. Again, thank you in advance for you opinions, Dave M.
  6. dwmc

    Menuki question ??

    Thanks Jean...just as I suspected !! Dave M.
  7. dwmc

    Menuki question ??

    Dear Menuki knowledgeable NMB Members, I'm in the process of restoring a Shinto era Tsuka. The tsuka needs ito as well as menuki replacement. I am finding it very difficult to decide on menuki, and have acquired several sets to choose from. (However, I definitely do not want to use some modern reproduction type menuki.) I recently purchased the set below and think the set would match well with the koshirae. I may be ok with with the menuki if they are at least Japanese Meji or Showa period. Please inform me, if possible, as to the time period of these menuki. They are a very light weight material, tin, aluminum, with two small prongs on under side, also with something which appears like a black lacquer. I would greatly appreciate your opinions. Thanks in advance, Dave M.
  8. I think it was Chris Bowen that once mentioned something to the effect of "beware of a wwll era made swords with two mekugi-ana." The day before the estate auction you were allowed to view items in which you may have been interested in bidding. The sword pictured above, I noticed was in overall excellent condition, the son of the deceased owner of the sword was not allowing the tsuka to be removed, which concerned me somewhat, but could also understand him not wanting people to assemble and disassemble and so on. I decided to roll the dice and bid on the sword the next morning. Apparently, some one had convinvced the son to removed the tsuka and I was able to take a brief look at the nakago. I immediately noticed the two holes and should have been able to translate the inscription as an Amahide, but couldn't for reasons I can't explain. Possibly due to the variations in signatures. The habaki was stuck tight and was going to be difficult to remove with out some work. I've managed to make a short story long and apologize, but I can't help but feel this is all part of an on going story of a sword which began in a Seki sword factory in the 1930's or 40's. After I won the bid and got the sword home and managing to get my eyes realigned, I realized the inscription was Amahide, which was amazing on account of my fathers bring back being an Amahide also. On to the two holes and the habaki . It took a while to gently remove the habaki , but when I eventually succeeded, the two holes were glaringly explained. This was machi-okuri due to a forging flaw moved from the blade to the nakago. I'm sure as suggested by others there are many reasons for these Showa era two hole nakago's, but in this case, as Dave R. suggested...a repair! Regards, Dave M.
  9. Hi Dave, I think you can just click on "down loads" at the top of the page. It should be the first article under "whats new" Dave M.
  10. More than happy to provide photos Mal. These are not the best of pictures , but hopefully adequate. The 1946 bring back is in possession of my younger brother, however, I do have oshigata photos. I'll provide it to you when I locate them Thanks again, Dave M. 20201113_142918.mp4
  11. Mal, I would like to thank you also. My father brought home a Amahide in 1946. Almost unbelievably, I purchased a Shin-gunto two years ago at an estate auction, only to discover it was also an Amahide. Both swords are signed with "kitau kore" which hopefully suggests traditionally forged. Below is my estate purchase which is daisaku daimei Amahide by Ido Hidetoshi. Excellent article! Again...Thank you!! Dave M.
  12. Correction...Good eyes Gentlemen...Horizontal stroke not diagonal..."Kanesaki" Dave M.
  13. Hello Chris, I would also suggest as Maxime mentioned above, a light coat of oil on the blade. The signature on the nakago appears to be Kanemitsu, other board members will surely correct me if I'm mistaken. There were many swordsmiths using the name Kanemitsu from Koto to Showa. Your sword appears to be in fairly good condition outside of the light surface rust. Judging from the nakago, I would guess the sword is at least Koto or early Shinto. Of course, as with many swords there are things that don't seem to make sense such as the large Mekugi-ana below the signature. Normally, this is due to the sword being shortened, however, too me, the nakago appears ubu. Again, other members may have a more accurate explanation... Dave M.
  14. This may not be the highest class Shin-gunto. However, I suspect it would be a welcome addition to a most collectors looking for a fairly nice looking gunto in good condition. Also, as Stegel mentioned above, simply trying to keep the thread active! Regards, Dave M.
  15. dwmc

    Ito color?

    Too much wine color?? Not enough contrast as green or cream perhaps ? Dave M.
  16. dwmc

    Ito color?

    Just wanted to clarify my earlier suggestion...bright Christmas red would not look good, but a darker maroon or burgundy color of red I think would look great! Cream color would also be a good choice! Dave M.
  17. dwmc

    Ito color?

    Chris, It's not easy ! If it had a bit of original ito, at least you could justify using the same color. Hopefully, you have menuki your happy with and don't have to suffer through making that decision also... I think the Fred Lohman silk Tsuka-ito # 13 Blood red would look nice on your Tanto ! Regards, Dave M.
  18. Good job spotting that one Trystan ! It's quite hard to see along side the gun rack. It's a Type 32 Ko as I'm sure you already suspected. The small show room in the picture is above a huge basement in which the owner claims to have over 100,000 items for sale. There was a time when many Pawn shops had a variety of Japanese swords lined up like the guns in the rack shown. Still a few to be found however!! Regards, Dave M.
  19. Both correct ! Definitely lousy picture Hamish...the sword has hung there for probably 40 years. I managed to buy it a while back, it's a short late war Kai gunto signed by Hiratoshi. There's another sword near the first, I'll see if any one can spot it before I point it out. Dave M.
  20. Just for fun, and to see how sharp your eye is for Japanese swords. How many do you see in the photo below ? There are still swords to be found in the USA, if you have the time to look...obviously not to the extent there were in years past, but still a few to be found in various antique and pawn shops. I would be curious to where swords can be found ( other than the internet in other countries.) Dave M.
  21. Have to stay with opinion in post #19, mistaken Kuni character. Dave M.
  22. Most likely meant "Inshu" and mistakenly used Kuni character? Dave M.
  23. Very odd indeed...(Kuni) Shu Ju Kagenaga ?? Dave M.
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