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waljamada

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waljamada last won the day on May 30

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    Adam

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  1. I think some of what I appreciate seeing in the blade is some of it's hataraki: for example the consistent sunagashi and togari. Nie and nioi both play their parts. It's splendid. I picture Numata Naomune more like book smart smith compared to natural "God given" talent type like a Kiyomaro.
  2. Filming and photographing blades is so hard and balancing/holding straight a 32" nagasa blade in one hand is near impossible! Also I had a bit too much choji on it. Aoi link to blade: https://sword-auction.com/en/product/10563/as20031-刀:沼田直宗/ A short terribly shot and out of focus video in all the wrong lighting: splendid nioi-guchi!?! and a pic. I will say that Numata Naomune was big into metallurgy and even wrote books on it. This blade does have more nioi-guchi than usual which is at that layer area at the top/inner edge line of the hamon. I forget some of the names/terms but during the tempering process it creates the softer pearlite hamon area and the harder martensitic steel area. The clusters/activity in that top/inner layer kinda bordering between the pearlite hamon and martensitic steel (I believe it has its own name) but in this blade that area has more going on. It does have the most interesting nioi-guchi (as I understand it) out of any blades I have. I think a guy like Numata Naomune would try for just such things.
  3. AlanK, Thank you very much for sharing your knowledge and thoughts on Miyamoto Kanenori and I'm glad some of his excellent works have found their way into your collection. Sounds they found the right person. This maker's life is indeed an intriguing one of note and acclaim. His designations and commissions speak to this clearly. Also, as a side note, I love the photos of him in his old age. A man who followed an art through a long life to the end.
  4. I didn't know about the late adoption of the kuyo mon. Must make those a bit rarer as they must be on a smaller percentage of their work. If you have in Miyamoto Kanenori bladed feel free to share here if the mood strikes you. =|:^)
  5. Anyone by chance know how to get an old picture off aoijapan.com blade posts that isnt on the archived version? I realized that the pictures of the guy who always looks at the swords at the bottom of the page is actually holding the specific blade they are selling. Now I kinda wish I copied that photo of the guy (Mr. Aoi?) holding/kantei-ing my blade.
  6. Alan, indeed it is. Here's a cool picture of the signsture/mon on a wakizashi.
  7. Always find these tameshigiri blades interesting and the side topic of notable testers. Notoriety in such a thing is oddly morbid but historically has it's context. The Yamadas I believe literally "wrote the book" on tameshigiri by defining/naming which cut is what. I do sometimes forget katana are firstly designed as lethal weapons.
  8. Here's some pics I took of it to help on your quest.
  9. George, Have a type 3 gunto saya kinda wrapped like that.
  10. Geraint, I have a tsuka like that but don't know what the wrapping material is. What are those typically made of? I thought it felt maybe like leather. Your example though looks like one solid piece.
  11. Woah....pics? I think he's got one of the cooler Artisan signatures with the circles...making a circle...
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