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Wakizashi With Sanbonsuji Hamon

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#1 David McDonald

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 04:51 AM

Dear All

 

I am working on a translation on

A wakizashi with a sanbonsuji hamon.

I think

信国義昌

Nobukuni Yoshimasa Yō

 

兼信銘有之

Kanenobu Mei Yū kore

 

Looks to be a signature from the shinshinto smith

Chikushu Minamoto Nobukuni tsukuru but not sure

Of all of the kanji and no idea of the translation

 

Any thoughts?

later

david

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#2 SteveM

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 02:39 PM

Hello David,

 

The mei is unusual:

銘有之 I have never seen this combination before. I don't know if it is alluding to a mei that was once on the sword, or something else.

   Another term that is new to me.

 

I wonder about the two names. Is it supposed to mean that the sword was originally signed by Kanenobu, but was shortened by Nobukuni Yoshimasa? If so, it is written in a way that I have never seen before, but that in itself doesn't mean much. Still, too many novelties make me suspicious, so I don't quite know what to make of this one. Maybe pictures of the blade itself might help. 

 

Many Mino smiths had 兼 in their names, and sanbonsugi is a hallmark of Mino smiths, so...that is something. 

 

Edit: I think the kanji I marked in red is wrong. I think it actually is 揚 (hand radical instead of tree radical)


Steve M

#3 John A Stuart

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 03:09 PM

If you take it as a whole 信国義昌楊兼信銘有之 Nobukuni Yoshimasa owns this named 'the' Yanagi Kanenobu Something along those lines? Then again if read as normal 兼信銘有之信国義昌楊 Kanenobu (signed originally as?) owned by Nobukuni Yoshimasa (Yanagi) That yanagi hanging on the end is odd. John



#4 NihontoCollector

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 09:45 PM

Here are more images. Mino.

Attached Thumbnails

  • b1.jpg
  • b2.jpg
  • b3.jpg

Luis


#5 SteveM

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Posted 19 March 2019 - 11:08 PM

I think the last one is 揚 , and I'll guess it is a reference to Nobukuni Yoshimasa's shortening of a Kanenobu blade. 

I suppose the next question is; does it look like a Kanenobu blade?


Steve M

#6 John A Stuart

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 01:18 AM

Deep fried? Haaaaa! Weird. John



#7 SteveM

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 01:38 AM

揚 "to lift up"


Steve M

#8 Bazza

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 01:52 AM

As in agaru??

 

BaZZa.



#9 SteveM

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 02:09 AM

Yes, ageru, agaru 

 

https://kotobank.jp/...p/word/揚-652698

 

旗揚げ とか


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#10 David McDonald

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 04:39 AM

Dear All

 

It is an interesting mei.

 

Could it be that Yoshimasa made the sword in the style of Kanenobu?

 

later

david


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#11 John A Stuart

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Posted 20 March 2019 - 07:41 AM

Is not ageru as in to raise or lift using 上 for swords, whereas 揚 in this sense is hoist as with ropes or pump as in water? I have a sword with this on it; 於武劦江戸照吉上之 John


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#12 David McDonald

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Posted 21 March 2019 - 07:08 AM

Dear All

 

Still not sure what this says and I hope someone can add to what has been said.

 

The sword will be auction and can be found at

 

https://jacksonsauct...ult.aspx?ID=456

 

later

david


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#13 David McDonald

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Posted 21 March 2019 - 07:09 AM

Is not ageru as in to raise or lift using 上 for swords, whereas 揚 in this sense is hoist as with ropes or pump as in water? I have a sword with this on it; 於武劦江戸照吉上之 John

So John

 

What does that translate to??

 

later

david


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#14 John A Stuart

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Posted 21 March 2019 - 09:06 AM

  Oite Bushu Edo Teruyoshi ageru kore. John



#15 SteveM

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Posted 21 March 2019 - 10:26 AM

Dear All

 

Still not sure what this says and I hope someone can add to what has been said.

 

 

 

I'm pretty sure it means what I said in my post #5 above

 

This blade has/had the mei of Kanenobu, 

and was shortened by Nobukuni Yoshimasa


Steve M





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