Jump to content
Mike T

please help with information on my grandfathers sword

Recommended Posts

昭和十五年八月日

正心

 

Shōwa Jūgo-nen hachigatu jitsu

Seishin (or Shōshin)

 

I think we have seen this smith once before in the thread below.     

 

 

See also the thread here:

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks again everyone for your help. does anyone have an idea on the value of my sword? I will never sell it but I'm just curious around what it is worth. I'll also know for insurance reasons as well. thanks again

, Mike

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Once you identify the smith the value can change drastically but for now around $2000-2500 would be appropriate for insurance.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

If you haven't read the full thread in Steve M.'s post, click on " By pcfarrar, July 31, 2008 " it's quite interesting , the mei was even a mystery back then.

As often with Japanese swords there are differing opinions, Chris Bowen seemed to believe the  Yanagawa Yukitaro  swords were most likely non-traditional made blades, where as Mr.Trotter states he knew of one which was good quality Gendaito.  Both are probably correct...

 

I'm not sure whether the rather unique Swordsmith will increase the value greatly, but I suspect it very well could. Possibly provide a few of your best quality pictures of the blade itself, Kissaki, Hamon, Hada, etc. for those members experienced in evaluating quality and condition.

 

 At some point, should ever locate a matching silver plated tsuba and appropriate seppa, the sword would be complete and look great.

 

Dave M.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
10 hours ago, Bruce Pennington said:

Is the saya (scabbard) aluminum?  If you have a magnet, see if it sticks. 

yes it is aluminum 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the updated information friends. here is some new pictures of the blade I also did a rub of the makers mark and colored it in to show it off more so we can figure out the maker. 

20200901_183615.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

That looks to be in great shape!  A real heirloom.  As others have said, it would be super cool to get original authentic parts to complete it. 

I just recently discovered a couple of incomplete blades that my grandpa brought back, as well as 2 mismatched tsukas.  My parents and I were just sitting around the dinner table lamenting the fact that most people in the western world are still ignorant of the history of Nihonto.  It's sad that so many of these were melted down or thrown into the sea, so to have one in that condition is a true treasure.  I know you'll treat it well :)

Cheers, and welcome to the NMB!

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Chevy,

Please go to your settings, and put in a first name that will show up on all of your posts. It’s forum rules, and we are just used to having a real person to talk to rather than a screen name. Thanks.

 

SteveM gave us the name in a post above. It’s “Seishin (or Shōshin)”.  He is an obscure Sword Smith, and no one really knows which pronunciation is correct.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thank you everyone so much for your help. me and my family are overwhelmed with the help. Does anyone possibly have a link or information on Seishin (or Shōshin) the maker of the blade? I'm making a dysplay for the sword and would like more information on the maker. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

This is what George Trotter said about him:  "The Yanagawa brothers of Saitama had been making swords in their shop in Suginami, Tokyo (next to Shinjuku)  since Meiji Taisho times, (mainly sabres etc which they "signed" with a stamp "Naotsugu"). Their "brand" name was "Shoshin".  In WWII they must have also been making gendai which the signed with the usual "cut" mei...usually SHOSHIN or USHOSHIN. "

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I have been looking around online for a silver finish tsuba and haven't had much luck. One question I have... I see alot of tsuba's that are one piece and ones and have many pieces. Can somone let me know exactly what I'm looking for to make mine complete? pictures welcome. Thanks everyone 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Yours would be a solid tsuba like in my picture above. It may be sometime before you come across one of these, you may have some luck if you make a thread in the wanted to buy section.

  • Like 1
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...