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Dick Tait

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About Dick Tait

  • Birthday 06/26/1967

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    Wessex, United Kingdom

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  1. I have had the opportunity to study the Japanese swords in a local military museum, this one particular sword is head and shoulders above the rest. I am looking for some clarification of what I interpret it to be?!!! This sword was taken from a Japanese Warrant Officer at Kabwet, Burma in 1945. It is in Type 98 mounts with a Company Grade Tassel. So why was an Officer's sword in the possession of an NCO? Well, perhaps the story is wrong or perhaps the Officer had been killed and the NCO, knowing it was a prized sword of the officer, was intending to return it to the family? Measurements: Nagasa: 69.5cms Nakago: 18.5cms Sori: 1.6cms Moto-Haba: 3.0cms Saki-Haba: 2.0cms Moto-Kasane: 0.7cms Saki-Kasane: 0.5cms Tsukurikomi: Shinogi-Zukuri Nakago: O-Suriage, Three (3) Mekugi-Ana Nakago-Jiri: Kiri-Jiri Yasurime: None Mune: Ihori Bo-Hi: Kaki-Nagashi / Kata-Chiri / Hisaki-Sugaru Kissaki: Chu-Kissaki Boshi: Kaen(?) / Kaeri(?) Hada: Mokume Hamon: Chu-Suguha (Nei-Deki with Nijuba, Uchinoke & Hakikake), The Hamon rises in final 12cms to enter half-way up Yokote). I believe that all this points towards: O-Suriage Tachi from the Late Nanbukucho / Early Muromachi period (1375-1428) and from the Yamato Shikkane School, possibly Norinaga? What do you think? Thanks.
  2. Thanks Thomas. The stamp looked like this..............
  3. I have seen a Flaming Grenade (possibly Flaming Pearl or Flaming Wheel) cartouche type stamp on a Seki made Shin-Gunto sword. There is a Seki stamp, followed by mei signature, then this cartouche type stamp. Has anybody seen this before? I thought that perhaps this Flaming Grenade stamp was a commissioning mark for the Grenadiers (Kempeitai)? Thanks.
  4. 1) Kai-Gunto (Naval) - do stainless steel blades show a hamon? 2) Type 98 Shin-Gunto (Army) - could an NCO carry a traditional ito wrapped (tsukamaki) type 98, as opposed to an aluminium one? 3) Flaming Grenade or Flaming Pearl (Cartouche) type stamp on Seki made blade? 4) Ko-Gunto (Type 32) Cavalry Sword - how rare? Thanks.
  5. Thanks for all your comments and knowledge, guess I deceived myself over this one then! I thought the overall shape was very good, hamon & boshi, nicely shaped kissaki and crisp yokote; altogether a lot better than most of the swords I get to see at the fairs I've been to. Signed and with no arsenal stamp, I was pretty confident this was a gendaito blade. Just goes to show; that even if not hand forged there was a good level of craftsmanship and respect given to making these swords and....I still have a lot to learn! Cheers, and Merry Christmas!
  6. Your example of Hiromitsu (Nakirishi Mei) does look like a good match, many thanks!
  7. Not suggesting this is Ikeda Yasumitsu of Yasukuni shrine (he died in 1941), but maybe Noguchi Yasumitsu of Seki, Gifu? The Mei looks like a pretty close match as per your Showa Oshigata Database, but I'll look into Hiromitsu... Yes, the tsuka-maki is all wrong - no age to it and a chicken Menuki!
  8. This is the (Tachi) Mei (Yasumitsu?) & Date (Showa Ni Ju Nen Ichi Gatsu = January 1945).
  9. Saw this at a militaria fair; liked what I saw, so bought it! (more pics to follow.....)
  10. I'd like to guess....Style = Rounded Square - possibly Edo Higo?
  11. I concur with this, the Token Society always seem to hold their meetings in London and usually on a Thursday night. Maybe they could hold meetings in other parts of the country, and perhaps on an afternoon at the weekend?
  12. In The Connoisseur's Book of Japanese Swords by Kokan Nagayama (pp.248) it says: "Hizen smiths always inscribe their signature in the tachi mei (in the case of katana) except for lyo no Jo Munetsugu"
  13. Perhaps to give the "appearance" of a longer sword?
  14. I think the question mark kanji means no dzu '[from] the design by'.
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