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Dr Bob

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Dr Bob last won the day on June 3

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About Dr Bob

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    Chu Saku

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    Male
  • Location:
    Boise, Idaho
  • Interests
    Nihonto. Bronze Age weapons. Martial arts minus the egos.

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    Robert Gilmore

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  1. Dear Brano, Nihonto Jiten was written by Tokuno. I believe the Fujishiro book would be the Nihon Toko Jiten. Respectfully, Bob
  2. Hello everyone-- I did a brief review of this book in another thread 9 days ago. Reposting it here: I received the “Sho-shin Index of Swordsmiths & Price Guide”yesterday. This is the first volume of Robert Cole’s long awaited book series on Japanese sword appraisal. This is a handy reference handbook for Nihonto collectors. It is not a picture book with pretty pictures of Japanese swords and beginner’s information on Nihonto. If you do not own at least the intermediate level references Toko Jiten by Fujishiro and the Toko Taikan by Tokuno, then this reference is not going to point you to any comparative oshigata or signatures of swordsmiths. The primary component of the book is 76 pages of single line listings of swordsmiths by name and kanji, along with 9 columns of useful information. This information includes the smith’s generation (if needed), working era, province, and page numbers if listed in the Toko Taikan, the Toko Jiten, and Hawley’s. Also listed is a rating of the smith using Fujishiro’s Chu-saku through Saijo-saku ranking system. Of use for comparative pricing is the column listing Tokuno’s “Man-yen” rating for the swordsmiths listed. There is a helpful section in the book listing swordsmiths by title; there are 49 smiths listed that had the Izumi-no-kami title and only 4 that had Totomi-no-kami for example. The titles are written both in Romaji and kanji. There are two listings of Nengo; one alphabetically (Romaji) and the other chronologically with kanji. One interesting listing I don’t recall having seen before is an alphabetical listing in Romaji for a spoken word, such as “Nori,” and the kanji that are associated with it. Apparently there are 9 kanji that can be used for Nori. Who knew? There is a Nihonto glossary and some other handy things in this book, but the author’s primary focus was on listing the swordsmiths’ data. If you want quick access to the information available in this book, you will find it very useful. If you are just beginning to learn about Japanese swords, then this book is definitely not for you. Bob Gilmore
  3. Steve, Thanks for providing a link to the Obon Society. I have a Yosegaki Hinomaru flag that came to me with a group of swords when I did an estate buy. I've kept it because I didn't know what to do with it. I will be sending it off tomorrow with the hopes that the Obon Society can locate the family. Bob Gilmore Flag sent out Priority Mail this morning.
  4. I received the “Sho-shin Index of Swordsmiths & Price Guide”yesterday. This is the first volume of Robert Cole’s long awaited book series on Japanese sword appraisal. This is a handy reference handbook for Nihonto collectors. It is not a picture book with pretty pictures of Japanese swords and beginner’s information on Nihonto. If you do not own at least the intermediate level references Toko Jiten by Fujishiro and the Toko Taikan by Tokuno, then this reference is not going to point you to any comparative oshigata or signatures of swordsmiths. The primary component of the book is 76 pages of single line listings of swordsmiths by name and kanji, along with 9 columns of useful information. This information includes the smith’s generation (if needed), working era, province, and page numbers if listed in the Toko Taikan, the Toko Jiten, and Hawley’s. Also listed is a rating of the smith using Fujishiro’s Chu-saku through Saijo-saku ranking system. Of use for comparative pricing is the column listing Tokuno’s “Man-yen” rating for the swordsmiths listed. There is a helpful section in the book listing swordsmiths by title; there are 49 smiths listed that had the Izumi-no-kami title and only 4 that had Totomi-no-kami for example. The titles are written both in Romaji and kanji. There are two listings of Nengo; one alphabetically (Romaji) and the other chronologically with kanji. One interesting listing I don’t recall having seen before is an alphabetical listing in Romaji for a spoken word, such as “Nori,” and the kanji that are associated with it. Apparently there are 9 kanji that can be used for Nori. Who knew? There is a Nihonto glossary and some other handy things in this book, but the author’s primary focus was on listing the swordsmiths’ data. If you want quick access to the information available in this book, you will find it very useful. If you are just beginning to learn about Japanese swords, then this book is definitely not for you.
  5. Hello members! I just registered myself with the NMB, and thought I would post an abbreviated introduction here. If anyone wants the whole thing, you are welcome to check out my profile page. I am a recently retired veterinarian. I lived in Tachikawa, Japan from 1965 to 1970 while my father was posted to Tachikawa Air Force Base for the second time. I was fluent in conversational Japanese, but have been getting rusty since my mother passed away 3 years ago. My father purchased two Japanese swords before we returned stateside in 1970. Those were passed on to me when I graduated from Veterinary School in 1982, and I have been collecting Nihonto ever since. I live in Boise, Idaho. Swords are not that common here due to the small population of the state. I have not had the luxury of limiting myself to any particular school of swordsmiths; I am happy to look at anything that happens to surface. Since I retired I have re-engaged with the JSS/US and the NCJSC groups, and am again actively looking for Nihonto. I have purchased 3 more Nihonto since the beginning of the year and my wife is saying that now that I have no actual income I should develop something called a “budget.” I am looking forward to membership in the NMB, there seems to be quite a bit of information available here. Bob Gilmore
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