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SalaMarcos

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About SalaMarcos

  • Birthday 03/07/1982

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    https://www.linkedin.com/in/marcos-andr%C3%A9s-sala-ivars-52958527/

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    Male
  • Location:
    Spain
  • Interests
    Tsuba - tôsôgu.
    Musô Jikiden Eishin ryû iaijutsu (Yamauchi-ha Komei Jyûku)
    Ryôen ryû naginatajutsu.
    Kashima Shinden Jikishinkage ryû kenjutsu
    Japanese art and Japanese koryû.
    Fishing.

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    Marcos Sala

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  1. If the guard can cover and, sorry to repeat, guard your hand, then it's a tsuba.
  2. Anyway, thanks a lot for all your hard work! I found this term in a ukiyo-e series of sashimono. I thought it was also some "preceding" sashimono, for example, during a daimyō gyōretsu. Thanks and best regards from Spain!
  3. Or maybe the correct way of reading is Sentebansashimono 先手番指物?
  4. Hi from Spain, Did you heard about a sashimono called: tejika bansashimono (手近番指物), and you know who represents inside an army or daimyō gyōretsu? Thanks in advance!
  5. After a second look, I agree with all of you, seems more Heianjō.
  6. Quick answer with quick view, Onin for me.
  7. Seems anzu or apricot blossom to me, check the families here.
  8. Well, if the tsuba can cover a "loose" cut, then its practical, other considerations is if it's comfortable to hold it in a sword or if can fitt well in any koshirae. I know I'm very weird, both here and in Japan, and such legends like Torigoye will hate me if was alive...but I think tsuba from Edo period (or even Momoyama) could consider a work of art independent from the nihontō, and could appreciate and delight like a painting. Also I must admit that I'm a kinkō lover, and an Edo period lover, as I'm also a Barroque lover regarding Western art.
  9. Dear friends, I hope you'll find interesting the following article I published last year and translated just yesterday. https://www.academia.edu/45515176/Study_on_the_monetary_value_of_Japanese_swords_and_their_fittings_during_the_Edo_period_1603_1868_
  10. Thank you Peter, I'm glad you like it. As you said, the difference between craft and art is a complicated question. For me, when you just copy without leaving any "fingerprint" you're a craftsman, then, when you think about composition, theme, chromatics...to create something new, not necessarily revolutionary, but with your own taste, then you become an artist.
  11. Dear friends, I hope you'll find interesting the following article I published last year and translated just yesterday. https://www.academia.edu/45515176/Study_on_the_monetary_value_of_Japanese_swords_and_their_fittings_during_the_Edo_period_1603_1868_
  12. Maybe Hirata or Shibata school. By the way, I really LOVE this set.
  13. Yes, since Nara jidai, it's called keshikomi zōgan, imported from China that was even centuries older.
  14. Thank you very much John for your post!! I will search more about Suzuki San Nagoya shop. I saw some of the tsuba you described in museums and Spanish collections and I listed as poor quality tsuba or shiiremono but I though it was from Yokohama docks and no idea about the shiiremono workshop in Nagoya. Later I will search and post the examples I saw. Again, thanks for the post.
  15. Dear John, thank you for all the information your collected over the years, and thank you again for showing us this beautiful tsuba. It was my plan travel to Japan in October, but due coronavirus it was cancelled. Maybe I will travel between February and April, and it's my plan visit again Ōkawa san, so I can ask him about this tsuba.
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