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Sword for both Nihonto and Aido!?

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Hello guys!

 

Still reading and reading nihonto-books!;-)

 

Still haven´t bought my first nihonto-sword for studying!;-)

 

But now I have begun with Aikido and Aido!:-)

 

My question is this!

 

If I would to buy a sword for studying nihonto AND to use it in Aido!!

What sword would be the ultimate purchase!?

 

I hope I´m on the right forum!

 

Yours

 

Stefan

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Hi Stefan,

 

Great to hear that you are making a study of Nihonto.

 

 

I agree with Sergio, use a Bokuto (Wooden sword) for your Budo practice.

 

 

Most students wreck their first Mogito/Iai-to.

 

A Bokuto is more forgiving, better a few blisters than lost fingers, or even worse a damaged blade..... :)

 

Gambatte!!!

 

 

Malcolm

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Remember that buying a nihonto does not mean you can do with the blade whatever you want. It's an art object and an historical artifact. They should be treated with great respect and care. The only historical blade I'd use for training would be a WW2 Gunto.

 

stm

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Hi Stefan,

 

Great to hear that you are making a study of Nihonto.

My plan was this!

 

To use a Bokuto in my Aikido-training!

And my olf factory-made Aido-sword for Aido-practise!

 

But I would like to know, what to look for in a sword in order to

study both Aido and my sword!

 

I would NEVER use a sharpend sword in practise!

Not until I´m master of it!;-)

 

A bit more credit, guys!

We swedes are not that stupid...after all we have not had war for over 400 years!;-)

 

 

I agree with Sergio, use a Bokuto (Wooden sword) for your Budo practice.

 

 

Most students wreck their first Mogito/Iai-to.

 

A Bokuto is more forgiving, better a few blisters than lost fingers, or even worse a damaged blade..... :)

 

Gambatte!!!

 

 

Malcolm

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Remember that buying a nihonto does not mean you can do with the blade whatever you want. It's an art object and an historical artifact. They should be treated with great respect and care. The only historical blade I'd use for training would be a WW2 Gunto.

 

stm

 

I know!

 

That´s why I study nihonto...in order to know more about them!

With as much as respect as a true nihonto-student would!

 

Ok! So you regard gunto as nihonto!?;-)

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Hi Stefan.

 

It's not just your choice but your Sensei's one too.

 

I'm sure he'll not allow you to enter the Dojo with a sharpened blade, not as a beginner.

 

On due time, he'll tell you the right steps to be taken.

 

Have fun and be safe. :)

 

I know!

I would never do anything disrespectful to my sensei or piers!!

 

Good heavens! no not as a beginner!

Until the moment will come....I will use me factorymade-aido sword!

 

Domo Arigato

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Stefan,

The board's official stance is to discourage using real and antique blades for sporting use. Hence the ..."dedicated to the study and preservation..."

Any repeated use of a Nihonto for Iaido will have a detrimental effect on the sword over time. Whether it be to the polish, or damage from bumps or handling..it certainly can't improve the condition.

 

I would therefore suggest that if you do need to use a traditional sword, then you commission one from a modern smith to your own specifications. It won't be cheap, but it will be the correct size, weight and style for you.

 

Brian

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Brian is spot on. Commissioning a Japanese smith to make a traditional sword for martial arts is quite common. Sometimes martial artists believe (especially those new to the arts) that it is either more proper to use an old sword (or just plain more romantic), or cheaper to obtain an antique for use rather than purchase a newly made one. Both are misconceptions. Newly made Japanese swords are just as traditional as antiques and are healthy enough for the rigors of daily use and training. Also, for the great majority of antique blades available, the koshirae (mountings) are also old and may not be safe for use, requiring a completely new koshirae be constructed. Wood, lacquer, rayskin, lace, all deteriorate with age. Properly made koshirae are expensive. Also, no sword lasts forever, and the frequent use that martial artists commit their swords to requires regular maintenance beyond just cleaning them. Some folks seem to think that once purchased, they never need any attention and last forever, but nothing is further from the truth. Handles need to be rewrapped, sayas will wear thin at the koiguchi and become dangerous (especially with beginners), handle cores will need inspection for proper fit to the tang, fittings will become loose and sloppy, mekugi will need replacement. There is no such thing as a maintenance free sword for training.

 

The commitment to using a sword in training is a responsibility far greater than just finding something you like. As was mentioned before, your teacher holds the final word. Different styles of swordsmanship dictate different requirements, so it's also very likely that if you premeturely purchase a sword, it may be completely inadequate for that style.

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Any repeated use of a Nihonto for Iaido ...
You're assuming he means Iaidô å±…åˆé“- what if he indeed talks about Aidô æ„›é“?

Sorry, couldn't resist ... :badgrin:

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Well..I'm not fluent in Japanese..but since "Ai" can mean love...

Is he practicing the "way of love" :?: :oops:

 

;)

 

Brian

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