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Determination Of The Period Of Mempo


nektoalex
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Thank! But do not be afraid ... bolder! :) Grandpa from an antique shop in Kyoto so earnestly assured that this is 19th century. that I succumbed to hypnosis. I understand the replica of the 20th century?

It looks to be Edo period to me, what part of the Edo period I could not say so that would be from the mid 1800s or older. You can can compare yours to some of the ones from my Pinterest board, you might find a similar one.

 

https://pin.it/cv5svamum4zhb3

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Thanks, maybe the Japanese grandfather really didn't know everything !?

Alexsandr, how is that? The shop owner said 19th century and I at least agree with him. No one else here seems to be able to state a time period but no one said it was 20th century replica either.
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Alexandr,

 

Eric gave good advice. He provides a lot of pictures on Pinterest and if you scroll down, you will find an almost “exact copy” of the men in question. The problem is, there is still no proof...

 

Well, I dare say it’s a replica (as I indicated above), maybe 20th century, maybe later. Not based by proof, but based on a bunch of circumstantial evidence.

I’ll “arrow” a picture, if it is desired and I can finde time.

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This a really nice high-quality reproduction menpo. Silk odoshi, yak hair Hige. Absolutely nothing to be disappointed about.
This standard is no longer maintained by today's manufactures. 

Some clues to why it's not very old.

1. The mask is not coated with urushi.

2. Inside the mask, you can see a number of exposed rivets where the features/hardware have been added. As you can imagine this would be unsuitable for a mask that was designed to be worn. Original masks have these covered over in kokuso and sabi, then urushi.
3. The odoshi is machine made, and not laced correctly with the absence of plugs under the kedate sections of the sugake.

4. The fukurin on the tare is not made from kokuso, it has two exposed pins anchoring in place on the lower lame, this is a common feature for reproductions. 

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DaveT, estcrh, and uwe thank you for your opinions and well-reasoned conclusions on the subject. Polar opinions lead to truth. I didn't have any particular illusions. Top of mind But do not take it so close to the heart of the respected IanB :)   .

 

Best wishes to all!

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Alexandr,

 

Eric gave good advice. He provides a lot of pictures on Pinterest and if you scroll down, you will find an almost “exact copy” of the men in question. The problem is, there is still no proof...

 

Uwe, having a data base of images stored for comparison can be quite helpful, I have taken the menpo image from this post and added yellow arrows showing the exposed rivets on the inside. I have compared it to a menpo that used to belong to Andy M, he said that his was Edo period, he should know I think. Notice how the interior of his is smooth with no rivets showing, other menpo that are supposedly Edo are smooth inside as well.

 

01ccac857635ce5b36ab1be9b988020f.jpg

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