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Some general questions about polishing and shinsa


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Hello guys,

 

I have seen the latest nihontoantiques update and I would like to ask some questions from you about it.

 

There was a sword sold which was stated made in the 1300's. http://www.nihontoantiques.com/fss525.htm

 

Its without papers and need restoration.

I also would like to buy a very old blade like that, one day. I guess these swords in excellent polish cost very expensive, so it would be an option to me to buy one in a condition like this one once.

My question would be that, what is the proper process in a similar situation. If I buy a blade like that, should I first send it for shinsa to be sure its really an authentic blade from that year, than send it to a polisher or first polish that to shinsa?

If the blade is already got an excellent polish it could rate it to a higher shinsa?

 

Thank you in advance for your reply!

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Hans

 

I would submit it for shinsa (it looks to be in good enough condition that the shinsa team could give a clear attribution). After shinsa results i would decide about a polish. One factor is are you looking at it from an expense/value point of view or do you just want to have a polished and papered blade.

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Hans

 

I would submit it for shinsa (it looks to be in good enough condition that the shinsa team could give a clear attribution). After shinsa results i would decide about a polish. One factor is are you looking at it from an expense/value point of view or do you just want to have a polished and papered blade.

 

Thank you for your reply Mark!

 

Another question I would like to ask is, that on the forum I read that collectors are not really satisfied with the swords made by western swordsmiths, how about polishers? Are there good polishers outside Japan? A Japanise polisher work is more expensive than a US or Eurpoian one?

 

P.S.: Sorry I accidently replied to you via PM.

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I think it depends on what you are looking for. There are some good polishers in Europe and USA, but if you are looking for a great one there is only one place to find them -> Japan. If you have a blade and want to make a good polish for it, living in Europe I would choose a polisher in Europe -> Mr. Zénon van Damme. He is a really good polisher and a very nice person. If you want to get THE BEST polish possible, then you should send it to Japan. But this cost much more and has some logistical difficulties (customs etc.).

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Hello Hans, about the European swordsmiths, it depends on their work of course, but you cannot call it true Nihonto because the swords are not made in Japan according to the traditional Japanese methods using tamahagane.

 

There are two swordsmith I greatly appreciate, both from Eastern Europe.

One who makes, or is trying to make Japanese swords is

 

Pavel Bolf

 

http://jswords.com/

 

He is getting better and better with every project he does.

 

The other one who makes European swords is Patrick Barta:

 

http://www.templ.net/english/weapons-an ... le_age.php

 

You only need to see their images to know they are good.

 

KM

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With the objective of purchasing a Nambokucho period blade, suggest developing connections with reputable dealers and/or collectors taking your time until the 'right' sword comes along. On occassion you'll find [a sword in need of a new polish] already with [Hozon or] Tokubetsu Hozon level [origami] that deserves careful consideration.

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Just remember that an out of polish sword will only pass shinsa if the polish is still good enough to identify activity and features. If the sword is in a state where these cannot be seen, it will fail with a note to resubmit when in a better polish.

 

Brian

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