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watsonmil

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  1. Many thanks to Piers who has kindly corrected spelling errors and incorrect use of terms. ... Ron Watson
  2. Dear Justin, Yes, ... I have edited accordingly ( re : ama-ooi ). For those of you who would like to see certain words edited/corrected, please email me at watsonr@mts.net or PM me via the NMB and that will help cut down on clutter. ... Ron Watson
  3. BULLET SIZES MONME .................... WT. GRAINS ........................ CALIBER .. mm ........................... CALIBER .. inch 1 .................................. 59 .................................. 8.7 ............................................ .34 2 ................................. 111 ................................ 10.7 ........................................... .42 3 ................................. 165 ................................ 12.3 ........................................... .48 4 .................................. 220 ................................ 13.5 ........................................... .53 5 .................................. 280 ................................ 14.6 ............................................ .57 6 .................................. 335 ................................ 15.5 ............................................ .61 7 .................................. 400 ................................ 16.2 ............................................ .64 8 .................................. 460 ................................ 17.0 ............................................ .67 9 .................................. 510 ................................ 17.7 ............................................ .70 10 .................................. 550 ................................ 18.3 ............................................ .72 20 ................................ 1100 ............................... 23.1 ............................................ .91 30 ................................ 1725 ............................... 26.5 .......................................... 1.04 100 ................................ 5000 ............................... 39.5 .......................................... 1.56
  4. ACCESSORIES Hinawa ............................... Match Cord Hinawa-ire ........................... Cord Container Dogu ................................... Tool Seseri .................................. Pick Koyaku-ire ............................ Priming Powder Flask Kayaku-ire ............................ Powder Flask Hiuchi-dogu ( Hokuchi )........... Lighting Devices Hayago ................................. Quick Loading Tube Doran ................................... Waist Belt Box Hayago-doran ........................ Box for Quick Loading Tubes Tama-igata ............................ Bullet Mold Tama-inabe .......................... Lead Ladl Danyaku-bako ....................... Shooting Box Muneate ............................... Cloth Chest Protector Tama-Ire .............................. Ball Storage Bag
  5. TYPES OF GUNS Ban-zutsu .................. Numbered Gun ( issued gun from arsenal ) O-zutsu ..................... Large Gun ( 30 monme and over ) Tan-Zutsu .................. Short Gun ( PISTOL ) Bajou-Zutsu ............... Carbine ( literally horseback gun ) Chu-zutsu .................. Medium Gun ( 6 - 10 monme ) Hazama-zutsu ............ Loophole Gun Kan-uchi ju ................ Percussion Gun Taihou ....................... Cannon Bo-hiya ...................... Fire Arrow Hiya-zutsu ................. Fire Arrow Gun Hiya Taihou ................ Fire Arrow Cannon Kayaku-Dameshi ......... Powder Tester Shateki-Zutsu..............Target Gun
  6. MATCTHLOCK PARTS Tsutsu or Jushin ......... Barrel Dai ........................... Stock Jiita .......................... Lock Plate Karakuri .................... Lock Karakuri mekugi...........Lock Retaining Pin Hibasami .................. Serpentine or Hammer Ama-ooi ................... Barrel Protector ( rain protector but also acts as a flash protector ) Ama-ooi Kusabi ......... Barrel Protector Wedge Hajiki ....................... Spring Dougane .................. Stock Ring Hibuta ...................... Pan Cover Hizara ...................... Pan Tray Hikigane .................. Trigger Meate ...................... Sight Moto Meate .............. Rear Sight Saki Meate .............. Front Sight Naka Meate .............. Middle S Juko ( Suguchi ) ...... Muzzle Karuka ( Sakujo ) .... Ramrod Mekugi Ana .............. Pin Hole Mekugi .................... Barrel retaining pin Zagane ................... Barrel retaining pin escutcheon Udenuki no Ana ........ Sling Hole Byo ......................... Rivet Hinawa Toushi Ana ... Match Cord Hole Shiba - Hikigane ....... Butt Protector Yuojintetsu .............. Trigger Guard Mei ......................... Signature Bisen ...................... Breech Plug Niju Makibari ........... Two Wraps or Double Layer So-Makibari ............. Thrice Wrapped / Triple Bound Koji ( Kouji ) ............ Outer most part of barrel ( strengthening or decorative surround ) Daikabu .................. Stock Butt Himichi ................... Vent ( re: Flashpan ) Kanime ................... Sear ( serpentine release ) Ibo-kakushi ............. Sear Protector Wasoku ................... Laynard hole Wa/Kan....................Ring ( possibly for holding a suspended tool such as a vent pick )
  7. Dear All, I thought it might be time to make a list of PARTS, ... ACCESSORIES, ... TYPES, ... BULLETS, ... ETC. for the Japanese MATCHLOCK ( TANEGASHIMA TEPPO, HINWA-JU ) in Japanese with English translation. I have been hesitant to overuse Japanese terminology as it pertains to the matchlock due to the fact that many of these words are so obscure that I dare say even the average Japanese has no idea of their meaning let alone Occidentals. Another reason is in most cases their is an English word that most who have any interest in firearms will understand immediately. I also detest Elitism which goes hand in hand with the use of a $ 10.00 word when a 10 cent word would have sufficed and made reading a whole lot easier. We also want to generate interest in this little known aspect of Japanese Art and people being people will bypass that which they do not understand upon initial reading and consequently miss an article which may well have kindled their interest. Anyways it is also important that we are able to provide our readers with a quick reference to these Japanese words and their English equivalents. It is my hope that those perusing this Article/Thread will email me additional words I may have left out and email me with possibly correct spellings of any words I have misspelled. ... Ron Watson
  8. Dear George, Back on Nov. 8, 2014 ... I posted : " Given the probable rarity of PERCUSSION CAPS in late Edo Japan, ... perhaps the gunsmith wisely allowed for the gun to be easily converted back to MATCHLOCK by making a hammer that would in an emergency allow for the insertion of a match by removal of the hammer insert and removal of the percussion nipple. Time and black powder erosion ( the opening is obviously eroded ) would have removed evidence of threading. Whether or not the nipple has broken off ( my opinion ) or has been purposely been removed and the gun operated post percussion as once again a matchlock we shall never know and it matters little. " I feel somewhat vindicated , as your last photograph is definitive proof that the gunsmith originally made the hammer ( serpentine ) exactly as I described above. Note in the photograph attached below ... the arrow pointing to the slot in the head of the hammer that allowed for the percussion INSERT to be placed and/or removed to allow for the gun to be operated as a percussion cap or as a matchlock at the TIME OF MANUFACTURE. This George was a very accomplished gunsmith and you created with your original post a most interesting discussion. I am not sure that the principal of Occam's Razor would apply here as I'm not sure who came up with the fewest assumptions ?? Never the less, ... I think you were well served by all of us trying and eventually solving the riddle. ... Ron Watson
  9. Dear George, I suspect the kamon ( three hawk feathers ) is silver or at least an alloy of silver. The fact that it has not patinated to a black may be due to something as simple as human sweat as this is a natural area for picking up the gun ( just a guess ). As far as the metal plate on the side of the barrel, ... this is where the original pan was fitted to the barrel when this was a matchlock, ... and it would appear this was added to disguise the patched up original vent hole and attachment of the old pan. This I am certain. Your friend's gun has created a good deal of questions and wonderful discussion. It was a pleasure to have seen it ... ( if only in photographs ). I have spent a lifetime studying firearms and I assure you to the best of my knowledge ... no special ignition system of even an experimental type would explain ( other than percussion cap or percussion pill ) this conversion. ... Ron Watson
  10. Dear All, Well now, ... we have a goodly number of theories as to whether or not this gun is percussion cap, percussion pellet, or some paper wrapped Japanese ignition system. I agree it is an unusual hammer ( serpentine ). I cannot explain but for theory except for the FACT that there are only three possibilities of ignition ... Percussion cap, Percussion pellet, or Matchlock. We know this was originally a matchlock later converted ... on that point we all agree. It may well be that an INSERT is missing from the hammer ( almost certainly ), ... but why not have designed the hammer with a solid or slightly hollow face to begin with. The gunsmith certainly knew his trade given the quality of the hammer and lock. What points to this gun as being a percussion cap conversion is as I stated previously : " What seals the idea of percussion is the gunsmith has added a small tit of steel ( shield ) behind the nipple which acts to prevent pieces of the percussion cap from coming back and striking the shooter in the eye or face upon detonation. " SEE PHOTO BELOW. I have only on rare occasion seen this device ( SHIELD ) and then ONLY on conversions to percussion where the nipple has been placed ON TOP of the barrel and the gunsmith instead of using the hollow faced hammer later used on ALL percussion style hammers used instead a FLAT faced hammer of the original first type used BEFORE someone thought ... why not make the hammer hollow faced to contain the flying bits of percussion cap. Given the probable rarity of PERCUSSION CAPS in late Edo Japan, ... perhaps the gunsmith wisely allowed for the gun to be easily converted back to MATCHLOCK by making a hammer that would in an emergency allow for the insertion of a match by removal of the hammer insert and removal of the percussion nipple. Time and black powder erosion ( the opening is obviously eroded ) would have removed evidence of threading. Whether or not the nipple has broken off ( my opinion ) or has been purposely been removed and the gun operated post percussion as once again a matchlock we shall never know and it matters little. ... Ron Watson PS. Denis, ... if I've told you once, I've told you a thousand times not to be sniffing nitro !
  11. Dear George, Well, that type of Serpentine ( hammer ) I have not seen before. It would certainly appear to have been a conversion from matchlock to percussion. The placement of the nipple on top of the barrel is unusual as well as it would interfere with sighting the firearm. I thought for a brief time it might have been a pellet ignition system but I am certain now that it was percussion and the nipple is simply broken off. What seals the idea of percussion is the gunsmith has added a small tit of steel ( shield ) behind the nipple which acts to prevent pieces of the percussion cap from coming back and striking the shooter in the eye or face upon detonation. The hammer however leaves me puzzled as it would not work to detonate a percussion cap and it on the other hand is hardly suitable for holding a match. The only explanation is that perhaps there is a flattened area inside the hollow of the hammer ( but from your photos this does not appear to be the case ... although photos can be deceiving ). The whole appears to be a Japanese conversion as both the lock plate and the hammer are similarly decorated in Japanese inlay rather than a later Western conversion. Piers or someone else will have to translate the Kanji as I am totally inept in this area. My first off impression is that it is a Kunitomo manufactured gun probably as Piers states of the Ogino tradition. Although an interesting gun, ... and nicely decorated, the fact it is something of a butchered up conversion ( to the top of the barrel of all places ), missing sight and no longer a matchlock gun will in my eyes lessen it value considerably. It's most interesting feature is the lock mechanism. ... Ron Watson
  12. watsonmil

    KOGAI Project

    Dear Stephen, I keep several different gauges of brass on hand, ... some new, some old. If you give me the measurements ( length, width ) ... I'll see what I can find you and sell you a few pieces at basically the cost of postage plus PayPal fees. Remember I live in Canada, ... so postage might be a little higher than what you would pay if I lived in the USA. You can email me privately at : watsonr@mts.net ... Ron Watson
  13. George, More photos are a necessity ! As far as selling, ... right here on this forum is as good a place as any. ... Ron Watson
  14. Dear Piers, He split the pictures into two threads because he's new to the forum. Perhaps we can prevail upon Brian to combine the two threads into one. It would make things a lot simpler. I also noted the nipple hole is on top rather than the side ( somewhat unusual ) and this is one of the reasons I reserve judgement and ask for more clarification in the form of photographs. Also note the lock itself is most unusual for a conversion, ... yet it appears to be a matchlock serpentine ??? ... Ron Watson
  15. George, I assume these are more photos of the gun I just remarked on. It is as Barry states probably a conversion from matchlock to percussion, ... but will need more photos of the SIDE of the barrel opposite the nipple opening. Also photos of the head of the serpentine ( hammer ). It is an interesting gun and in particular the lock is rather unusual for a conversion. ... Ron Watson PS. I note Piers has replied, ... I would personally reserve judgement until I see the photographs requested above and in your other posting.
  16. Dear George, A photograph of the complete gun ( side, top and bottom ) profile is required. Also if you remove the barrel from the stock ... there is probably a signature on the underside of the barrel. A photograph of this signature would go along way in answering your question as to origin ( school and age ). As far as the mon are concerned, ... I will leave that to others. Without these additional photographs identifying the gun is not possible. ... Ron Watson
  17. Dear Brian, What is the trade name of the moldable plastic ? Also, ... I can probably source you some tiny brass nails. I'll check and see if my hardware store still has any ( the store has been run for nearly 80 years but is soon to close, ... the only hardware in Canada that I know of where you can walk in and buy horse shoe nails and sleigh runner bolts of all things ). If you PM me your postal address, ... I will try ( no promises ) and forward to you by mail. Needless to say I am extremely proud of your accomplishment. I have been at this sort of thing for well over 30 years and I still get a thrill out of a restoration well done by myself rather than contracting it out. ... Ron Watson
  18. Dear Brian, HOT DAMN, ... you did an excellent restoration. Love the patina. Also when I see how carefully and well you got your metal to wood fit, I can only say well done yet again. Did you use a lead solder or silver solder where the join is. I am surmising silver solder. PM Ford, ... and see if he can give us some insight into patinating that area or better yet comment on the NMB. The only other thing I can suggest is to very carefully file away the silver solder where it has run up the trigger guard slightly until you get to solid brass. This would leave you with a miniscule join of silver. Now then do I notice a missing insert ( perhaps a Maple Leaf ) just behind the lock plate. That should be replaced. Make a rubbing of it and transfer this to some flat sheet brass and start cutting and filing. You've done one hell of a fine job of getting the lines of your trigger guard to look both artistic and correct. You should be suitably proud ! ... Ron Watson
  19. Dear Brian, Congratulations on completing your trigger guard ( yuojintetsu ). Now you see why I caution the overuse of Japanese terminology when an English word is more precise and understandable for now. I look forward to seeing your photos. When silver soldering one should have as tight a fit as possible ( the solder will still penetrate ) and if possible solder from the side away from the viewer. This eliminates most of the tell tale join when patinating, ... BUT not all. You are right though it is the chemical reaction to the two lookalike but different metals that causes the grief. I would be interested to hear what Ford's thoughts or solutions are to this problem. Personally I try to disguise it with a slightly darker patina in that particular area. Hard to explain, but I imitate a natural ( as much as possible ) stain somewhat larger than the join area. The only other way of getting around this would be to cast the barrel band ( dougane ) which few of us have the expertise or equipment necessary. I wish Ford would join in here with his thoughts as I am but a clutz whereas he is an artist. On a slight tangent, ... I used to have 20/15 vision ( exceptional eyesight ) and although my distance vision is excellent I now need reading glasses which makes restoration work more difficult since so much of it is fine detail work. Also I appreciate your noting that the odd dint or slight gouge or scratch it expected on a 100 - 400 piece to give it the feeling of age, ... a real NO NO is leaving file marks. File marks MUST all be removed ( speaking of items other than swords here folks ). ... Ron Watson
  20. Dear Chris, Although we have had differing opinions on occasion, ... I have grown to appreciate the fact I cannot match you on your sword knowledge or many of our other members for that matter. What I especially respect you for however is your unwavering assistance and advice freely given. It is thru the sharing of knowledge ( and on occasion being corrected ) that I derive the greatest pleasure. as I believe you do. It is indeed sad that both the collectors I mentioned have/had amassed impressive collections ( with the occasional bad choice ) but failed to participate with others with the same interests. They simply hung their treasures in their Den and admired them without the least interest in their study or their history or their sharing with others ?? ... Ron Watson
  21. Dear Piers, This one took some time mostly because of the tiny chip missing from the stock lip just ahead of the fitted dougane. I didn't notice it before I started and although tiny, ... it created headaches when I wanted a perfect fit. Anyway, ... it turned out not bad. I ran across two American Matchlock collectors. One in particular has at least 25 matchlocks. He has not bothered to translate a single signature. He obviously has more money than the average collector by far, ... but I don't get the idea of simply accumulating without study ! I have known him for years but the other just passed away and his collection was held basically in secret. It is in the process of being liquidated. Sad really as he had a few rare pieces but no intention of sharing with others his knowledge or even communicating for the purpose of learning about what he had. ... Ron Watson
  22. For those not familiar with the Japanese nomenclature of Matchlock parts ... the DOUGANE is the brass ( usually brass ) stock ring that is present on virtually all Japanese matchlocks at least the rear stock ring but occasionally also further up the stock nearer the muzzle. I will not spend too much time going into the fabrication of the rear stock ring as these can usually be fashioned by bending a correct shaped piece of brass stock around the wood stock and then silver soldering the ends where they meet under the stock. A couple of things to remember is : the brass that is available commercially is usually terribly hard and therefore requires annealing ( heating to a dull red with a propane torch and then immediately immersing in cold water ) to soften. Where each bend in the band goes the brass should also be scored on the inside using a triangular file deep enough to aid in the bending ( trial and error ). Once the two ends are joined by silver solder any final fitting can be accomplished using a flat file to get a nice snug brass to stock fit. Now then, ... the front barrel band ( dougane ) is somewhat more difficult as you are fitting the brass not only around the stock but also the barrel of your matchlock. The difficulty here lies in the slight stock ridge protruding on either side of the barrel. Since this forms a right angle to the barrel and therefore causing the brass to make a sharp slight perpendicular bend before bending vertically downward to continue around the outside of the stock it is difficult to get a nice snug metal to metal ( barrel ) to wood fit particularly if the dogane is rounded rather than flat. A thin flat dougane can often be bent to shape by hand ... see first photograph for a thin flat front dougane, BUT a dougane of greater thickness will be virtually impossible to fit by hand. This is the reason for this short instructional article. Most ( other than the thin flat dougane ) are made from a round brass stock ( rod ) ... quite often 1/4 inch ( 6mm ) or possibly 3/16 ( 5mm ) diameter which must be cut in half to make a half circle. This is accomplished by laying a slightly LONGER than required piece of round stock in your bench vise and allowing half to stick up above the vise jaws. Then using a hacksaw and using the top of the vise jaws to act as your guide ... you make your cut. When finished you should end up with the brass round stock cut nice and straight and the top half THE WIDTH of your saw blade smaller than the bottom half. The top half is the piece we make our stock ring from. Now, ... take the brass half circle you have made and at the center point bend ( remember to have annealed the brass ) it snugly around the portion of the barrel where the dogane is to fit ( some barrels are slightly tapered ) so this is important. Now allowing for a slight error in measuring ... mark ( using a pencil ) each side of the brass about where each side will come in contact with the stock lip. Use your hacksaw to make the cuts. You now have three pieces of brass half round stock. A top and two sides. Try fitting the top piece of the dougane to the barrel to see how much too long you have cut it and mark these points with a pencil. Set aside ... and fit each of the other halves and bend to go around the stock ( having left about 1/8 inch protruding above the stock lip ( this is why we always cut the brass slightly longer when preparing the half round from the original round rod ). Now hopefully as you bend around each piece of brass around the stock on it's final bend before the two halves meet at the bottom side of the stock you will have left enough brass that they are going to overlap slightly. The excess we will worry about later during the final fitting and before we solder these two ends together. Using two small C-Clamps join ( one side at a time ) to our rounded barrel piece of brass with the side pieces overlapping the rounded piece as in the drawings I have provided. This should then be silver soldered. Repeat with the other side. Once cooled ... we now have a single piece of brass and WITHOUT having silver soldered the bottom joint together, .... we try fitting to the matchlock, ... noting how much of the rounder piece must be filed away on each side ( on the inside ) to get a nice snug fit around the barrel butting up on the stock lip. File until this rounded piece of brass fits snugly around the barrel and just touches the stock lip Now we file the outside excess overlap away until it just nicely meets the sides of the rounded portion .... see drawings. Once I am fairly satisfied, I mark off the brass stock at the underside of the stock so that they butt up against one another. This can then be silver soldered together. There we now have our front dougane which of course will need a little more filing to get a perfect fit. Once you are satisfied the brass may be polished ... although a few tiny dints need not be removed as these will lend age to the dougane. The whole may then be patinated to the right colour. Remember, ... I should have mentioned this before you may have to gently use a dull chisel and hammer to get that nice fit at the lip section of the srock where barrel meets wood in the final fitting. The almost completed dogane I picture still needed a little fitting before perfect as shown in my last photograph of the finished dougane in place on the matchlock. Some may say, ... well doesn't the silver solder detract from the brass ?? The answer is no, ... not if you are careful as silver solder takes on the appearance of brass rather than a silver colour. These front dougane are the more difficult to make compared with the breach end dougane ... and others may have a different way of fashioning a replacement, ... but I assure you I've made several and putting things back to original condition is a most satisfying reward. I wish you luck and patience. As always any errors or omissions are mine alone. ... Ron Watson
  23. Dear Henk-Jan, Congratulations AGAIN, ... should you wish to sell, ... I'd even pay the shipping plus PayPal fees ! Thank you for posting. ... Ron Watson
  24. Dear Dan c, Since the die thread used in the forging of the barrel was HARD steel, ... and the Bizen was of soft steel, ... it would be only logical that the threads on the bizen were hand filed to match the threads of the male die. The male die was probably reused numerous times in other barrel making. See: in the first part of the addendum : " The female screw was made by forging; therefore the shape was tapered screw and the male screw was cut from a low grade steel bar, confirmed by their macro-structure. " ... Ron Watson
  25. Dear Jan, Here's another set from one of my swords, ... similar to Richard Stein's. ... Ron Watson
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