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watsonmil

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watsonmil last won the day on February 9 2015

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    Canada
  • Interests
    Samurai Arts, WWII SOE/OSS/RESISTANCE

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    Ronald Watson

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  1. To NMB Members, I just finished packing this past weeks orders. Worked most days until 1:00AM. Between running to the PO for shipping quotes and receiving payments via MO, PayPal, and Wire Transfers, answering Emails, ... it has been hectic. I must thank those whom have made purchases and / or just emailed to say hello to an old enthusiast. Among those who made a MAJOR PURCHASE was a Dr. James B. McNicholas from Virginia. This gentleman was very professional in his dealings and I can recommend him wholeheartedly. I must go to Winnipeg, MB to see my eye surgeon on Tuesday, 21 September. I will return Wednesday afternoon and I promise to list a Sword and a grouping of Tanegashima Accessories PDQ. The Nobuyoshi Sword is NO LONGER available as it is on hold pending payment. Ron Watson
  2. Dear NMB Members: Due to the overwhelming number of Emails asking for photographs of, or do I have this or that, I MUST SADLY STATE I WILL NOT RESPOND TO ANY EMAIL UNLESS IT IS FROM SOMEONE WHO I CORRESPONDED WITH IN THE LAST TWO DAYS. I WILL BE LISTING ITEMS ON A WEEKLY BASIS ON THE NMB ( two or 3 items or a particular category of art which could be as many as 10 pieces ). I am sorry to take this step, but the heavy load of Emails from people just wanting to be curious and NOT serious buyers is affecting my health. I hope you will all understand. Thank you to those who have made a purchase and I look forward to assisting and continued sales on my terms ( I think they are fair terms ). ... RON WATSON
  3. Good Morning, A Mr. @Fred Geyer emailed me this morning and although I used the email address given, ... my emails keep coming back UNDELIVERABLE. If Mr. Geyer would like to email me again at : 766watson@gmail.com, ... I will try yet once again or we can find an alternate way of communicating. My telephone number is : 1 - 431 - 807 - 5032
  4. I think tomorrow, too tired tonight, I will put up my Tsuba Collection, and possibly a Sword. I thank those who have already made a purchase ( from my so far unlisted items ). If there is something in Japanese Art or Weapons ( all antique ) that you collect just email me : 766watson@gmail.com I probably have at least one item of interest as I have been collecting for over 40 years and bought ONLY the best that I could / could not afford. so there are well over 100 individual items in my collection. ... Ron Watson
  5. Gentlemen, Some of the " old timers " on this forum will remember me. My Name is Ron Watson. I am 74 now and since my son & grandson have no real interest nor money, I wish my modest collection of Japanese Art Works to go to those who have a serious interest in preserving and studying the ARTS of the SAMURAI. I will start off slowly with three items and we'll see how things progress. I will try and add a items a week . At that rate I should finish in about a year. My entire collection is available and I do NOT plan on hanging on to but an item or two which I have promised as a keepsake to my son & grandson. I did many articles for the NMB and I believe that most of these are Archived, ... so if you scan thru the articles and see an item I have not yet listed, an email to : 766watson@gmail.com will get a reply. All sales will be FINAL and payment by International Money Order or Wire Transfer to my bank. I must warn you however that given the WORLD"S confusion and being totally frustrated with SHIPPING RULES, ... I will only ship within the rules of CANADA to International Buyers. I will not use CANADA POST as our Post Office is no longer reliable for anything which will cut and / or possibly fire a projectile ( even if ANTIQUE ). For all other items I can use CANADA POST but will have to quote individual shipping costs for both Canadian and International BUYERS. I believe Air Canada Cargo will handle or possibly Fedex but I am not sure of Fedex. Anyway Buyer is responsible for shipping and shipping costs. The First Item : Katana Sword in newly custom made Saya with period Fittings ( Fuchi, Kashira and Menuki ) and Waterwheel Tsuba of nice iron. The Fuchi Kashira with gold and silver on a Shakado base ( unsigned ) Tsuka is new and wrapped with good quality same and silk. Katana is signed : Yamashiro ( no ) Kuni Heianjo Ju ( Nobuyoshi ) Nagasa : 71.9 cm Sword Shape : Hon Zukuri Jihada : Ko Mokume Hamon : Choji Midaire Era : Late Muromachi ( 1490 - 1510 AD ) Period : Sue Koto Boshi : Kaeri-Fukashi, with Mune-Yaki extending back over the mune for about 14cm. Sunagashi is prevelent, as is occassional line of Kinsuji The Shinogi-ji has patches of hitasura spaced evenly along its entire length. APPRAISED and papered by Kotoken Kajihara in 1984 Photographs may be seen by referring to an Article I did for the NMB by typing in the search box " A Favorite Sword Ron Watson " This article is archived by NMB and was done in 2010. For additional photographs please email me. PRICE $ 10,000.00 US FIRM
  6. Dear Guys, There is no point in beating a dead horse. The Post Office, DHL, UPS, PUROLATOR, TNT, ... have all stated they are not interested in shipping firearms and at least some ... NO WEAPONS period. They made it abundantly clear this includes PARTS of Firearms. If I were in France, ... I am pretty sure I could have arranged shipping, ... but I am not in France and there is only so much one can ask of a friend. After Purolator telling me they would ship, ... they came back to me with the ridiculous figure of $ 2438.30 US ... knowing full well that anyone with half a brain would decline. As I previously stated, ... I could have flown over myself and brought it back as Cargo Luggage ... BUT... it would have to be locked in a hard gun case. Most outfitters I know in Canada and the USA tell their clients NOT TO BRING YOUR OWN FIREARMS as a gun case is an invitation saying : STEAL ME ... instead we will supply you with hunting rifle and ammunition. I appreciate your suggestions, ... but enough already. I worked on arranging shipping for a full bloody month to no avail and even had free lance shipping agents working on the problem. Weapons whether Antique or modern are rapidly getting to be a NO GO in spite of the LAWS of the two nations involved. The PO's, Courier Companies make their own rules ... and you Sword Collectors had bloody soon see the writing on the wall. I at one time operated one of the World's finest Antique Weapons/Militaria/Fine Art/General Antiques businesses in the world. I never got rich, I did it for the love of history and to preserve what little is left. Shipping was one of the major reasons I shut down. I also had one of the best collections of SOE/OSS/WWII Resistance artifacts supplying International collectors, Governments, Museums with the very rarest of artifacts from Enigma Machines to the most deadly of Assassination Devices thought up by man. I SAW the writing on the wall post 9/11 and thankfully cleaned house. With today's restrictions I would have been stuck with thousands of dollars in inventory not to mention my personal collection which luckily for me I also disposed of. Take Ivory as another example ... and see what the bloody Obama government has done, .... all in the stroke of a pen and be smug and sit back thinking oh well it wouldn't happen here. Well my friends try shipping a piece of Antique Ivory and see the hoops you must jump thru no matter where you live outside of an Asian country of course ( the biggest importers of poached ivory ). If anything destroys the collecting of NIHONTO it will be shipping issues, government restrictions and the general populations obsessiveness with Political Correctness and peoples apathy in view of the so called Nanny State doing all your thinking for you. I am truly sorry for painting such a bleak picture, ... but prove I am wrong ... PLEASE. ... Ron Watson
  7. Dear All, As both Jean and Ian pointed out this is a Carbine ( Bajou - Zutsu ). Thank you for pointing out this oversight in my writing of the article. ... Ron Watson
  8. I would like to describe a very rare and interesting Japanese Teppo of the late Edo Period. But first a little background information should be disseminated. Gun makers the world over had been interested in developing an ignition system to replace the Flint Lock mechanism. Napoleon had ordered French scientists, engineers, inventors to devise a more reliable ignition system than the Flint Lock. By 1800 several compounds had been discovered that were capable of detonation when struck by a sharp blow. A French scientist Claude-Louis Berthollet had been experimenting with such compounds with the intent of not ignition but of replacing black powder as a gunpowder. He abandoned his research when he found that the compounds were too explosive and forceful to act as a propellant. A Scottish Clergyman and amateur chemist by the name of Alexander John Forsyth was also experimenting with these compounds as early as 1793. His idea was not to find a substitute for black powder but rather a better ignition system to detonate the black powder charge contained in the barrel of his gun. You see he was an avid waterfowl hunter and often found on rainy days his flintlock shotgun was prone to misfires. It was to him that credit is given for the use of a compound and the development of his scent bottle dispersal of the percussion sensitive compound ( Fulminate of Mercury ) is to be credited. His system although effective was so delicate that few firearms were built on his invention. He patented his invention in 1807. It probably falls to a British Gun Maker by the name Joseph Manton ... who actually formed the explosive compound into a tiny pill. Thus with a single pill sitting in a tiny recess in the pan ... finally an easily workable SIMPLE system of ignition was developed to replace the flintlock. Far from being perfect this pill was so tiny as to be easily dropped and again the system was only in favour a very short time before the invention ( supposedly by several inventors ) was developed but credit is generally ( although erroneously ) given to an American Joshua Shaw who patented it in 1822, ... that being the percussion cap. Although of little significance to this article it has pretty much now been proven to be the invention of a French gentleman Monsieur Prelat in his patent of 1818. A small cup shaped piece of copper closed at one end that not only contained the ignition compound but could be fitted over a nipple with a vent leading to the main barrel charge. It was not until the 1850's that the percussion cap was integrated into a metallic cartridge containing all in one unit, .... the ignition, the powder charge and bullet. By the late 1860's the metallic cartridge had made the percussion system obsolete and for the most part the metallic cartridge is to this day the most common form of ammunition. Now on to the specimen pictured. Although very little is known of the development of percussion detonating compounds in Japan. It is known that one Sakuma Shozan a chemist and physician in Matsushiro Fief in Nagano Prefecture was experimenting with detonating compounds in the early 19th century. It is almost certain that he would have learned of the experiments being carried out in Europe via " Learned Books " being imported into Japan. It seems to follow that a certain gunsmith by the name of Katai Kyosuke Naotetsu from Shinshu may have been converting a few existing matchlocks to the PILL system of ignition by inserting a solid striking pin into the mouth of the matchlock serpentine. This being around Bunsei 10 ( 1827 ). This may be true as he is credited with upgrading the pill lock by the addition of a sliding pill box In Tempo era ( 1830 - 1844 ) as seen on the gun presented here as well as those found on page 171 of Tairwa Sawata's book on early Japanese Firearms. I do not know if Katai Kyosuke Naotetsu was the builder of this firearm pictured or if he is solely responsible for ALL of those pictured in Taira Sawata's book, ... but I believe ALL were created in the same workshop. I base this conclusion on the unique similarities. Note the style of sliding pill dispenser ( little or no variation ). The stock shape of each, ... the assisted lever for cocking the serpentine, ... the serpentine shape, ... the iron ramrod of peculiar style ( fitted with a hinge arrangement for withdrawing and inserting in the barrel and then fitting the handle into the muzzle when not in use ), ... the exiting of the ramrod from the stock part way down the stock. Trigger's and trigger guards pretty much identical. With the exception of the hinged ramrod ( a rarity on any matchlock but are found ) and of course trigger and trigger guard, ... I know of no other similar examples in Japanese firearms. This particular example weighs in at 3.5 kg. It is 95 cm in length. The caliber is 1.55 cm therefore 6 monme. The only missing piece that I have noticed is a small round iron cover for the firing pin arm spring. This could easily be made up and replaced with a little caution as to the thread size of the screw which would have held it secure. I will continue this article in the next post with photographs of the features found on this rare Teppo. As always any errors or omissions are mine alone. NOTE: Sadly since beginning this article, ... I was forced to sell the example I had purchased in France without ever having my hands on it. It is a long, frustrating story but the Pill Lock Teppo will NOT be coming to Canada. Please see my explanation here : Dear All, It is a long, frustrating story but the Pill Lock Teppo will NOT be coming to Canada. French Post Office will not ship, UPS will not ship, FedEx will not ship, DHL will not ship. Only Purolator Courier were willing to ship. The parcel weighed less than 7 kg. I believe in actuality, it weighs 5.3 kg. All French Customs and Canadian Customs cleared. I thought finally ... Then Purolator Courier phoned to get my approval .... Freight charge to ship to Canada .... $ 2428.30 US dollars. Purolator said they would only ship to a Customs Broker in Canada, ... so I would also have to pay Brokerage fees. Just having it shipped to Canada was going to cost me far more than I paid for the gun. I was then making arrangements to fly over myself and pick it up, ... bringing it back as personal CARGO luggage. This was fine, ... but another $ 615.00 ( economy fare return ) it is an off season right after the New Year so I was able to get a reasonably priced air fare ... and this is not including incidental travel , and other expenses. There is also the worry about THEFT in Airport Cargo both in France and Canada as Air Canada said it would have to go in a locked gun case ( talk about an invitation to theft ). Since I could only afford to be away 3 days ... with counting time in Airport check in, actual time in flight it added up to 40 hours out of 48 hours given the time difference between France and Canada. My health is not up to that ( I doubt a much younger person's is ). Fortunate ( in a sad way ) for me, ... a friend in France bought the gun from me at my cost. This issue of shipping has become nothing but a nightmare. PS. The National Sales Manager for Purolator Courier ( based in New York ) was to call me .... I guess she never had the guts. ... Ron Watson This post has been promoted to an article
  9. Dear All, Here is a link to a recent thread now missing on : " THE NEW FORUM " http://www.militaria.co.za/board/viewtopic.php?f=87&t=20989 I can only hope that the above will act as a venue for continuing the discussion should interest warrant it. ... Ron Watson
  10. Dear Jason, The Japanese are in many ways still a closed society. In many countries Spanish is spoken, in many countries French is spoken, in many counties English is spoken, ... but ONLY in Japan is Japanese spoken. The average Japanese may have some English language training but rarely use it. Many members of our NMB speak English as a second language. When I was in France, although I tried to converse in French, ... I often found myself being told ... " I do speak English "... or ... " Je regrette, mais votre français est terrible, peut-être si nous conversons en Anglais " I often felt terrible that most people under 40 years of age could speak very passable English yet I whose country is Canada have two official languages English and French and yet I could not converse properly yet I read French text fairly well. Virtually all sellers on JAUCE are Japanese and only conversant in Japanese so contacting the foreign buyer is virtually impossible. English being the International language of business seems to mean nothing to the average Japanese business man let alone the ordinary Japanese working man selling off a few flea market items for an extra Yen. ... Ron Watson
  11. Dear Jason, Here you go .... http://www.jauce.com/category-leaf/2084 ... age=1&n=20 Actually this is a better link : http://www.jauce.com/ Over on the right hand side is an orange area that says Register. I have only bought a couple of items but had no trouble. Beware though that by the time they are finished handing your item over to ship, you will be paying around 30 - 40 % more for their handling fees, etc. ... Ron Watson
  12. Dear All, There are at present two supposed Teppo ( matchlock ) netsuke listed on eBay. One is started at $ 850.00, the other at $ 950.00 .... both are listed as being in Japan. Interesting enough on Jauce ( a Japanese auction ) ... the exact same two are listed at 28000 Yen ( $ 235.00 US ) , the other at 32000 Yen ( $ 265.00 US ). BEWARE. ... Ron Watson
  13. Dear Dan C. From what I've seen the TOSA School were primarily the users of this type of trigger guard. Perhaps Piers knows of other schools ? In this field of study one should never say " only ". However it is usually seen on only large bore guns where recoil would catch your middle finger on the trigger on the backward motion of the recoil and at the least probably bruise the finger. There is usually a reason for everything, ... but not always ! ... Ron Watson
  14. Dear All, Well, ... I think this ole boy has just about had it. Since I last posted regarding UPS shipping of an ANTIQUE FIREARM out of France to Canada, ... I have been engaged with trying to arrange shipping. Jean our moderator ( in France ) has been of great help to me and I thank him profusely. There are no laws as far as I can tell that would be broken, ... but tell that to an f...ing bureaucrat or shipping courier. I will be seeing my Grandson over the next few days, ... and I think I shall at the very least advise him against taking over the collection. This shipping issue that MOST are having is just the tip of the iceberg. Governments will not be happy until they have completely destroyed our hobby and related hobbies ie. " Antique Weapons ". Yes we can write letters, .... but the day of dealing with government and/or bureaucrats has pretty much come to an end. They are now so isolated from US/WE that the days are rapidly coming to an end where you can sit down and use reason. The majority of people do not give a tinkers damn and it is the majority that governments are formed from, ... not rational thinking nor an even handed approach to everyone. Perhaps I will regret posting this " rant " as I'm not exactly promoting our cause, .... but never the less it is the truth as I see it. ... Ron Watson
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