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O-Midare

Your thoughts on these kozuka dinner knives.

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Hi,

 

I presume I am stating the obvious here: the decoration on both sides of the handle means that they were "born like that", i.e. they are not actual kozuka adapted to kitchen knives, but rather "kozuka-like" decorations of regular knives' handles. I saw a set of twelve such knives sell for 562.50 EUR (including fees) at a recent auction in Paris. The ones in your post appear to be more-finely chiseled to my untrained eye (but the picture of the Paris knives is very poor).

 

Cheers, Pietro

 

P.S. I would also wonder why "Meiji period Japanese knifes" are marked "Mappin & Webb" on the blade...

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Dear Dwayne.

 

Pietro is quite right and be aware that they are pressings so as part of a collection they are overpriced, removing the blades will not make them suitable even as replacement kozuka in koshirae so the question is do you want some cutlery?

 

If so then I guess the value is up to you.

 

All the best.

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The price is cheap currently but won't stay there.
I would appreciate these as an example of Japanese metalwork/art, and not sword related. They do stand up just fine on their own.

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The price is cheap currently but won't stay there.

I would appreciate these as an example of Japanese metalwork/art, and not sword related. They do stand up just fine on their own.

 

The blades in Dwayne's set are marked "Mappin & Webb - Sheffield", and the ones in the Bohnams set are marked "Jules Piault". Does this mean that European jewelers were importing the handles from Japan and fitting them on locally-made blades and forks?

 

Cheers, Pietro

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Yep, or supplying the hardware to their agents in Japan for fitting?
Mappin & Webb are famous for their silverware etc. I have some bowls by them. Probably was the "in thing" during the early 1900's to have these as your tableware.

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