Jump to content


Photo

Help Id And Background

tachi katana

  • Please log in to reply
6 replies to this topic

#1 RSJ

RSJ

    Chu Saku

  • Members
  • 2 posts

Posted 20 July 2016 - 09:12 PM

hello,

 

i went to a museum and found this sword stuck in the corner. some info was on it in the display but i was wondering if anything else could be added. I am curious as to: 1) what type of sword it is; 2) when it was made; 3) who might have made it; 4) what the decorations are; and 5) would it be considered unique and important to Japanese history also? Any other info you can had would also help.

 

thanks,

RJ

Attached Thumbnails

  • 20160716_121655.jpg


#2 ROKUJURO

ROKUJURO

    Juyo

  • Members
  • 2,547 posts
  • LocationIn a deep valley

Posted 20 July 2016 - 09:58 PM

RSJ,

please be so kind as to sign all posts with your first name plus an initial, as is requested here on the NMB board.

As you wrote, there was some info on it in the display. I am curious what was written there?

The sword seems to be an EFU no TACHI, but in a variant with a phoenix (HOO bird) as pommel. These TACHI were used for ceremonial purposes at the Imperial court. There are old originals up to rather new ones made as late as the 20th century, and they were even sold to wealthy tourists.

As usual with Japanese swords, there was not one maker, but every single part was made by a specialized craftsman. Of course, the swordsmith was the most important, and the value of the whole depended largely on the quality of the blade. Many later EFU no TACHI were only decorative items and had very simple blades of no artistic value.

These TACHI are not reallly rare, as far as the later ones are concerned.

   


  • ggil likes this
Regards,

Jean C.

#3 ggil

ggil

    Jo Jo Saku

  • Members
  • 491 posts
  • LocationCA

Posted 20 July 2016 - 10:02 PM

From that picture not much can be safely said. For all one can really tell it may be a Chinese fake. Lots of those out there, and even a couple places doing copies of this (almost exact) style koahirae. It would be nice if we could read the card on the table in front of it. That would probably help allow some decent answers. if it is real I'd be surprised, because it would be worth some coin and not displayed near playing cards but in a nicer fashion. It may have the providence the card says, but still be a replica too.
- Grant

Grant G.


#4 Geraint

Geraint

    Sai Jo Saku

  • Members
  • 1,634 posts
  • LocationCornwall UK

Posted 20 July 2016 - 10:30 PM

Dear RJ.

 

Have a look at this one here,  http://www.aoijapan....urine-lacquered You will see that the hangers for the scabbard and the phoenix head are upside down as well as one or two other misplaced parts.

 

All the best


  • ggil likes this
Geraint

#5 Jean

Jean

    Daimyo

  • Moderators
  • 8,040 posts
  • LocationFrance

Posted 21 July 2016 - 10:57 AM

RJ, please comply with Board rules and sign all your posts with a first name and an initial :)
Jean L.
Soshin Gimei

#6 RSJ

RSJ

    Chu Saku

  • Members
  • 2 posts

Posted 21 July 2016 - 03:21 PM

Thanks to all for the information! Whether real or a Chinese replica this sword appears to have had an interesting journey to end up here. Just the provenience on the display card gives it some importance to i guess local history. The errors in assembly makes me think it could possibly have been hastily pieced together from individual parts that were perhaps mailed to US after the war? I know soldiers did that with rifles back then and some even get caught doing it today. It would be cool to get an expert to go to the museum and put his hands on it but Gatesville, Texas is kind of rural and out of the way. If it is authentic, i would like the museum to note that and display it with the respect it deserves.

 

Regards,

Richard J.


  • ggil likes this

#7 ROKUJURO

ROKUJURO

    Juyo

  • Members
  • 2,547 posts
  • LocationIn a deep valley

Posted 21 July 2016 - 05:06 PM

Richard,

this is a good idea!

Besides necessary imformation for the museum visitors, there are precautions against corrosion and decay to take. Please read here on the board about care and handling of Japanese swords. To advise the museum it might indeed be wise to send one of the experts of this board; hopefully you find one in Texas! 


  • ggil likes this
Regards,

Jean C.





Also tagged with one or more of these keywords: tachi, katana

0 user(s) are reading this topic

0 members, 0 guests, 0 anonymous users

IPB Skin By Virteq