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Opinions needed for personal comfort..


J Reid
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Hey guys!

So I am just looking for some opinions/input. I just picked up a signed and dated, no star stamp, Muto Hidehiro gendaito. Mint polish, original shirasaya, original solid silver habaki that was made to fit blade and shirasaya, papered tokubetsu kicho.

 

Only problem is.. upon inspection I noticed the smallest, smallest( about 1mm, almost looks like it just wasn't polished to a perfect point), tiniest chip out of the tip of kissaki.

 

I am a perfectionist, and it makes me sad to see this chip, even if it is so minuscule. I contacted moses today about a possible estimate, and turnover rate of fixing the chip. But I guess I am just looking for fellow collectors opinions on whether or not I should turn a blind eye to this chip, if its un-desirable, if this was your sword, would you be satisfied? will this make an impact in a possible future re-sale and should it be fixed to please aesthetically?

It will make me sleep better tonight if I hear how the members of the board would feel if this was their blade. I guess I just need to hear that I'm going OCD over this chip and to just let it slide. :doubt:

 

NOTE: Compared to market values, I do have room for repairs, I just don't like sending my blades away if it really isn't necessary.

Also I am sorry for the link. This is my first time trying to upload photos.. I am happy to upload more photos to my album upon request, I just stopped photographing as soon as I noticed the sad, sad chip. :(

 

Best regards,

J. Reid

LINK: http://WWW.PHOTOBUCKET.COM/MUTOHIDEHIRO

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Chris is right... even a tiny chip like that would probably require the use of one of the coarser shaping stones like binsui-do or kaisei-do to maintain proper kissaki shape, and there is a very good chance other parts of the blades polish would get ruined in the process. Then the whole sword would have to have at least the final stages of polishing redone.

 

It might be possible for a good togishi to fix it without messing up the polish, but I would think it might not be worth the risk.

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It might be possible for a good togishi to fix it without messing up the polish...

 

Key word is "good"....I have had kissaki repaired several times but always by a fully trained, professional with 30+ years experience...

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But, you could ask a polisher what it would take to fix the boshi. If it were my sword, and one I wanted to keep, and if I knew that the chip would bug me always (it probably would), I'd send the picture to Bob Benson or another properly trained polisher, and ask him what he could do and what it would cost.

Easier to decide when you know what your options are.

Grey

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I take your query as being related to the philosophy behind whether to repair or not repair...or...

My opinion on the philosophy (rather than cost and/or risk of further damage etc) is this...

I once owned a star stamped example of this maker (oshi on Rich Stein's oshi database). It was in original wartime polish and mounts. It did have a few "usage" marks and battle scratches and what the dealers call "nail-catcher" mini-chips. For me, this was acceptable condition, as the polish was easily viewable and the "damage" was just normal battle damage...all acceptable.

In your case, you have a sword that has been re-polished and papered...I would expect the tip to be as perfect as a new polish would make it...I could not accept a damaged/poor quality finish on a restored, remounted, re habakied and papered blade. Personally I would have to repair or sell.

Just my opinion.

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Thank you everyone for your replies. I totally agree with both opinionated sides. I was sure moses beccera was an experienced polisher, and that I can trust him with the repair, if I decide to sway that route. I will also shoot bob an email to see what he has to say.

 

Chris- I like your straight forwardness. If its going to damage the blades polish, and make more work all around. If its going to be hard on the blade, and take years off of its life. Than as its keeper, I should let it be.

 

Grey- I personally feel the way you go on when you state your opinion in your reply. I want to keep this blade, and I want it to be perfect! It will bug me. If an experienced polisher says he can take care of the kissaki within a reasonable cost, and not hurt the blade, nor polish, than hey, why not? It will only continue to bug me if I don't. If they say they probably shouldn't and I should let it be until the sword reaches a point of needing a fresh polish in 2150 etc. (haha) in order to preserve the piece, than as its keeper, I should respect and adhere to those words.

 

George- I also agree with you. If the sword is set to be perfect, other than this flaw, and its reasonably possible to fix, than I should have it done. It can't be perfect, and not be perfect. Battle wounds are a different story. If the chips are there from being used, and polish to match. It holds a different aurora/energy to its current state. These can be acceptable in my eyes as well.

 

So overall, I will seek repair, if it is safe for blade, polish, and budget. If not, I will love it regardless. Its still very sad though, as I know for a fact it got chipped by those goofs in customs handling this blade without any proper form :(

 

Best regards to all,

J. Reid

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Several years ago,i accidently chipped about1mm of my training shinsakuto kissaki and the damage looked identical to your swords. however my sword is in a cutting iaido polish unlike yours. Chris Osborne fixed mine, without polishing off too much material. at the time Bob Benson told me he could of fixed it easily for $150usd. this was a few years ago though. drop em each an email and see what they say.

 

Best of luck,

 

Jeremy

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This thread is quite old. Please consider starting a new thread rather than reviving this one, unless your post is really relevant and adds to the topic..

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