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Arsenal Stamps.


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Here are two anchor stamps, a Showa stamp, and a star stamp from a Kaneaki katana in 1944 mounts. Almost all star stamps I have seen have been mounted in 1944 Type 3 "NLF" mounts. I've only seen a couple in Type 98 mounts. I wonder if this had something to do with the timing of implementing RJT/stamping.

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Finally, here is a 'W' stamp from a Mantetsu and an interesting 'Patent Patent' stamp from a mumei Kai Gunto. It is upside down here but which is how it looks when holding the nakago. Also interesting is that it is in English? :dunno:

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Matt, I would go so far as to say that all those stamps are "na"...indicating the link to Nagoya arsenal.

 

just a point for members...there is no "late '44" or "NLF" pattern fittings. They are ONLY "Type 3" . It was slightly incorrect early research which coined these labels.

Official Japanese sources quoted on Ohmura's site show that (probably) due to the decline in stocks of non-ferrous and alloy metals, that

the Type 3 fittings were introduced in Koki 2603 year (1943)...hence Type 3 fittings...largely made of iron.

Star stamped swords will be found in Type 98 fittings also (intro Koki 5598 year = 1938)...these are a variation of Type 94 fittings...intro in Koki 2594 year = 1934.

 

It is likely that "Type 3" fittings were trialled earlier than 1943 as photos of officers holding them have been noted from 1940 and 1942 (see Fuller "Mil & Civ" p.78 and footnotes 2 & 3: and "Handcannons of Imperial Japan").

 

It is interesting to see that the "W" stamp appears on so many named and un-named blades and also the "Nishi" (west) in a circle stamp...that is new to me...maybe it is a private company/private smith's stamp like "Matsu" (pine) in a circle stamp?

 

I think it is good to discuss these seemingly unimportant things as it all adds to the sum total of our knowledge and enjoyment of collecting.

Regards,

Geo.

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Hi,

 

enclosed find my contribution for this great thread.

These two pics are from the book ""Swordsmiths of Japan 1926-1945" from R. Fuller and R. Gregory.

If somebody needs the pics with better resolution - just let me know!

 

kind Regards

Klaus

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Hi Klaus,

Thanks for the pic...for newer members I should just say that some of the explanations of the meaning of these marks given under this pic have been up-dated...some of it on this very forum.

 

Just a point about items vi (Na) and vii (Dai or O in a pentagram) I have seen these two together, but not on a blade. They were stamped into the kabuto gane of a high quality Type 98 fittings of a sword. The blade was 2nd generation Hizen Tadahiro and was taken in the fighting at Milne Bay in Papua New Guinea.

I suspect the marks were put on as "custom order" by workmen engaged in fitting quality fittings (the tsuba was the rarer gunto sukashi, but with a mimi of about 5/8 '' (15mm?). Perhaps there was a fittings shop associated with the Osaka/Nagoya arsenals?

Just thought I'd mention it.

George.

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Hi Klaus,

Thanks for the pic...for newer members I should just say that some of the explanations of the meaning of these marks given under this pic have been up-dated...some of it on this very forum.

 

George.

Dear George,

 

I was aware about this (e.g. xviii (star stamp) ---> unidentified?!), but I thought this is still a useful information especially for the very rare stamps :roll:

Of course a further "research" is always necessary.

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Hi Lindus,

I waited for a reply, but looks like you have stumped us all. I have not seen this before...it seems double struck to me. The kanji is in an ancient style and I can't translate it...hopefully Morita san or Moriyama san can comment? Because it is in Kyu-gunto mounts I suppose it must be Meiji-Taisho period, possibly very early Showa?

 

At the risk of loud laughter, may I say that my attempts at translation suggest the two kanji are possibly a mei (reading R to L) Nao --, or as Nao means "mended", "restored", it may be Nao --, meaning this sword was "refurbished", "restored"...? Just a thought.

 

Regards,

George.

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Showed it to Ron Greory and Dick Fuller many years ago,same thought that the stamp had been applied twice and possibly a variant form of the Tan...................Think I'll go fishing also usually a fruitless exercise ;) ;)

 

Thanks anyway folks

 

Roy

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  • 2 weeks later...
A couple more better pics of the same Gifu stamp (on 1st page)

 

[attachment=1]01s.jpg[/attachment]

 

[attachment=0]02s.jpg[/attachment]

 

 

So this stamp means that the sword was made in Gifu? i have a sword with this stamp on it signed Hiromitsu January 1945, so it would be interesting to know where this guy was located

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Dear All

 

Today at the San Francisco NTHK shinsa there were two star stamped swords that were

papered

 

Kanehide dated 1943 and Katsukiyo dated 1944.

 

I was told that if a star stamped blade was sent to Japan it would be broken up as

a weapon -- so even with papers you would NOT want to send to Japan with the star stamp.

Also I was told that there are oil tempered star stamped blades that would not

get papers so it is all in the blade not the stamp.

 

later

david

 

 

 

If people would like to take close up pics of the various stamps found, along with any info, and post them in this thread..I will sticky it for future use. This assumes we have a decent number of submissions, and they are clear enough to use here.

Would be good to have a few examples of the Showa stamp, Star stamps, and all the others out there, no matter if Gendai or not. I doubt very many would pass shinsa anyways, and I think we have yet to see a verified star stamp blade pass NBTHK shinsa.

 

Brian

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