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sorry i had forgoten to mention that when i say historical and artistic i am still wanting this to very much be an authentic weapon. one which i can train with and gain an intimate knowledge of. not just some piece of art. And if Nihonto refers to authentic real Japanese swords, like my understanding leads me to belive. then i have indeed found the right place, now i just need to learn.

 

 

_______

Cliff

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Cliff, the term Shinken, has been purposely used to confuse one. Yes technicaly, a shinken means new sword, however, it it now used as a generic term for a sharpened, non traditional sword (not true Nihonto), used for martial arts. A shinsakuto, on the other hand, is a traditionaly made sword, "Nihonto." If you want a traditional Nihonto, cancell your orders and contact http://www.japaneseswordsocietyofcanada.org/ Or, JohnBerta, http://www3.telus.net/sword/sword/index.htm/MyWebs6/

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Cliff,

Those are not Japanese swords, and never will be. They are higher end Chinese swords, with the usual blah blah about the smith moving to China and forging swords there. They have absolutely no value as art, and are comparable with any other Western "Samurai sword"

If you want something that is Nihonto, you need to rather browse the links above the forum.

 

Brian

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Thank you Brian, I am slowly finding out what i need to find out, it is taking me some time perhaps now that i rembered google translate, i might be able to move a lil quicker through the echelon ladders. i have been looking through many fantastic blades most i am finding are from the Showa Showa period and late to some early Edo period's hopping to find something slightly older in the 1200-1300's time line. as for the one i am getting done in honor of my mother, i have done some investigation and have chosen to have it done by the KASHIMA sisters of Usagiya forge, thats if there willing to accepet my commission on this Shinsakuto piece. time will tell.

I must say in 1 day of reading this communities forums. i have learnt more about Japanese swords then i have in 10years, granted this has alot to do with the fact i live in a very small town in canada and are libaries and book stores dont carry anything on this topic what so ever. and i never knew where to start looking. but much love to david and brian for there fantastic advice.

 

*oh and the orders placed with DSA have been cancled.

__________

Cliff

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  • 2 weeks later...

My name is Christopher Treichel. I have been reading this message board for some time and find the discussions very interesting.

 

My interest in nihonto comes from my love of cutting implements as I study any and all methods for their construction and use. My love of nihonto comes from atempting to understand the height of the art of manipulating metal which is present in these works of art created in Japan. I am astounded every time I get to see another, but never forget that they are in their own right tools, albeight very beautiful ones.

 

I have been grateful to have had the chance to travel to Japan to see the sword museum in Tokyo, to meet a sword smith and have marveled at the collection on display during the special and ongoing exhibits in the Metropolitan Museum of Art in New York. These past two years I have also been studying Nakamura Ryu Batto Do.

 

I have much to learn...

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Hello everybody!

 

Long time lurker, but I finally decided to join the forum since I want to take my nihonto interests a bit further (aka actually buy a blade). :oops:

 

Yeap, I am embarrassed to say that I don't currently own a nihonto (it is an expensive hobby after all) but I have done a bit of reading on the subject, as Japanese history, art, and pop culture is a passion of mine. I own a gendaito kabuto though.

 

I am probably one of the youngest here, at 33. I am not a native English speaker so please excuse the numerous syntax and grammar mistakes that I will probably make.

 

Looking forward to have great conversations with you guys!

 

Dimitri.

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hi everyone my name is Corey. I am a University Student from New Zealand and have a growing interest in katana's. Over the past year as a student I have collected 11 katana, two are shinsakuto made by a local smith, they are traditionally forged and polished (one of the blades is Suguha Choji Hamon saka choji, nie-deki Kinsuji), two are clay tempered katana, two are damascus and five are tempered mono steel blades. I started purchasing swords for tameshigiri but now I collect them as art. I have joined as I have become interested in genuine Nihonto and I am planning to purchase a shinsakuto from a swordsmith living within Japan in the next few years.

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Greetings!

 

I'm not a collector, but I do own a Katana (I think) signed by Ikkanshi Tadatsuna (I've been told). I've tried over the last 11 years to learn more about this sword; even had a scare from an exchange student that it may be a Kokuho (national treasure).

 

I believe the good folks in NMB will help me understand and learn more about this sword and look forward to any help/advice I may gain here.

 

I've realized that since the start of my research that these are much more than swords, they're wonderful works of art... masterpieces. I saw several collections when I lived in Japan and observed a 'return home' blessing of a lost sword. Cool stuff.

 

Will post pictures of my Katana in the appropriate board when allowed. Cheers to all!

 

San Sa Guthrie

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  • 1 month later...

Hello and good morning everyone. 8)

 

My name is Anthony. I have been lurking for a while now, and decided it was time to register and say Hello. I am 26 years old, and first became interested in Japanese swords while studying Mandarin in college (I just started on learning Japanese as well, and it is actually much easier). I don't remember exactly what it was that first caught my attention, but I fell in love with the grain-work achieved in some blades. There is also a weird feeling you get when looking at a well-polished blade and knowing it is over 400 years-old. You wonder what it has seen in its lifetime.

 

I have always been fascinated with ancient and antique art, and I have a rather handsome collection of ancient coins from the Byzantines / Romans / etc. You can learn a lot about a civilization by looking at the money they used, and like-wise I feel you can learn a lot by looking at the weapons they produce also. And to not call these hand-forged blades art would be blasphemous.

 

Well, that's a little bit about me. I am just glad that I found a community as knowledgeable as this one to learn from. Thanks again everyone.

 

Back to lurking. :)

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Hi everyone my names Kieran and i'm currently living in the uk. Im a university student in the south west of England and found myself intrigued since a small child with samurai and there ethics. My great grandfather fought in Okinawa and died there during ww2 for the Japanese. Currently what amazed me was that some of the soldiers who were lucky enough to have swords passed down through there family had them mounted gunto style for war.

 

-kieran :phew:

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Hi All,

Happened upon this site while thinking about a sword tang I am translating for some friends.

 

I have collected the arms and militaria of Imperial Japan for close to fifteen years now but, despite having several reference books on the subject, only bought my first Japanese sword - a Type 19 police-markeed Kyu-gunto - earlier this year. I am saving my pennies to buy a Shin-gunto at some point, hopefully sooner rather than later though.

 

This forum looks to have quality information and participants and I'm looking forward to interacting with everyone more in future.

 

Thanks,

 

Gunnar

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