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Hello everyone.

First of all, I would like to thank the members of the forum for all the posts that make it the best place for me to learn something about this Japanese art.


My interest is not to become a collector (money is not enough for that).I just want to buy a katana to enjoy watching it thinking that it was forged by a smith hundreds of years ago and carried by a samurai. At most I can expand in the future with some Tsuba.
My wish:
katana or wakizhasi more than 50 cm
period edo or earlier
Shirasaya with Koshirae
mei
papers
good conditions
with a budget of 3000 euros maximum (and VAT in Spain of 21% that increases the price) all the requirements are almost impossible.

examples that I am evaluating in aoiart
https://www.aoijapan.com/katana-mumei-echizen-seki /
https://www.aoijapan.com/wakizashimumei-hizen-kami-shigetada/
both are mumei and it depends on how high the auction goes
in Spain it is difficult or impossible to get katanas or see someone in person so this page gives me confidence. I have seen other pages but the appearance of the katanas of that price range is much worse.

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Hello! I'm an acupuncturist and a long-time practioner of martial arts, and started collecting Longquan swords; but late last year acquired a gunto from patient who had bought it form a local WW2 vet, who'd taken it from a battlefield in Okinawa. The hamon was absolutely gorgeous, but there was no signature on the nakago.  from pictures, Ray Singer believed it was a gendaito.

 

Recently, I bought an unpapered Nobusada Wakisashi.  I had no idea if I could trust the seller, but I loved the polish job on it so much, I figured what the heck. Then within days, I bought a late muromachi katana from Aoi-Japan, just because I liked the longer nagasa and deep sori.

 

Now that I've put the horse before the carriage, I'm here to learn more.  Hoping to either find or organize a group in my area (Richmond, VA), and I will be at the Chicago show later this month!

 

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Welcome John. 

 

Be careful not to get your Nihonto mixed up with your acupuncture needles - it could be a tricky lawsuit!  :oops:  :laughing:

 

Jon

 

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Hi all, My name is Mike, I live in the Northern Territory of Australia. I have been interested in Nihonto for some time now though I never thought that I would actually own one. Kids have grown up, things are paid off and I have a modest discretionary income now so I just bought my first sword from Aoi.

I know the normal advice is to see as many blades as possible first but that is not practical given my location and budget. So I decided to bite the bullet and buy one and begin my learning curve for real. Can't wait to have it in my hands and I am sure I will be pestering you blokes with all manner of dumb questions in the future.

The blade I bought is a blade by kanesaki with papers.

Regards, Mike

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hi - I teach Asian art and history at a local college.  I've been a collector of Asian art for 35 years or so.  Mostly Chinese but I'm now getting back into collecting Japanese art.  I collect netsuke and sword fittings mostly but have somewhat catholic tastes.  I also have a collection of Ainu artifacts.

 

Anyone on the Central Coast of California?  I miss having contact with other local collectors.  I live near Morro Bay.

 

Gary

 

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Hello all - my name is Joe, I live in Northern California (SF) and recently began exploring an interest in Nihonto. 

 

My appreciation for these works is centered around their unique aesthetic and relative design complexity, as well as their cultural significance (esp. in the context of the eras in which they were originally crafted, up to and including present). 

 

As my journey with Nihonto is still in its early stages, I am always seeking out additional knowledge. If you find yourself in possession of such knowledge and do not mind me asking you various questions that occur to me, please feel free to shoot me a message! I look forward to learning from this forum. 

 

-Joe

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Welcome Joe -

As Stephen has pointed out you live in the absolute best part of America for sword study! Sorry to say you just missed our public display at the Northern California Cherry Blossom Festival, and actually at the Cupertino Cherry Blossom Festival this past weekend.

 

Please note we have moved our May meeting to the 22nd to avoid Bay to Breakers congestion, it costs nothing to attend and I hope you can join us. If you've any burning questions between now and then you can hit me up here, send a PM or an email.

-tch

NCJSC.President@gmail.com

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Well done Tom.
I think it's time to think about activating a huge part of this forum software...clubs.
It's an advanced feature allowing for private clubs with numerous features. Maybe we can look at an online private section for each sword club where the members can discuss, make announcements, downloads etc. Something to consider.

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Thank you gentlemen -

I didn't do anything special, its all part of our "Apprenticeship" program, Fred is mentoring me in the role. Always looking to the next generation. With that in mind we are having conversations with the JSSUS, NBTHK and others about combining our efforts and providing more content online. Stay tuned!

-tch

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  • 1 month later...

Hello,

 

I'm Damon. Born in Texas, but grew up in Louisiana. I've been living as an expat for the last 22 years, and was fortunate enough to have lived in Japan for over four years during that time. Amazing place, and just reinforced my interest and love for the place.

 

I've had an interest in Japan from a young age, probably in large part due to an officer's sword my grandmother had in her house that I would get glimpses of when visiting during summer breaks. Other interests include history, militaria, antiques, and collecting (in general). 

 

My current collection of Japanese wares includes inro, other laquer, and a modest tsuba collection. I also have a number of books on the subject. I'm certainly interested in learning from all of you, and contributing where I can. Many thanks to those who set up this site and those who contribute. There's a lot to go through.

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  • 4 weeks later...

Hello All,

 

First, thank you so much to all those who keep/maintain this forum. I just discovered it, and am absolutely thrilled. 

 

I am originally from Reno Nevada, but now live in West Lafayette Indiana. My first exposure to nihonto was in 2003 on a trip to Japan. A friend of mine and I stumbled upon a dealer's shop in Okayama City. I couldn't believe my eyes. I had no idea owning such things was possible. The dealer (I believe his name is Ando-san) was so gracious to let me gawk at his wares. Of the roughly $1000 I brought for a really cool gift all was spent at that shop. I purchased three tsubas (which I will upload to another forum topic to see what thoughts are thunk about them). I saw that him at the San Francisco show the next year, and he was so very kind (we had lunch together). He also gave me contact information of a collector who lived in the Reno area (whose name I have lost). I was lucky enough to get ahold of this person who spent about an hour on the phone with me. One piece of advice he gave me was to NOT start collecting at that point in my life. I was an undergraduate student at university, and so had little/no cash. I never stopped thinking about nihonto. All these years later (having graduated with a doctorate degree and with a job) I am in a position to begin a serious collection. 

 

As it stands, one could fill several giant warehouses with what I do not know about nihonto. I find the level of precision and technical knowledge of the members here to be absolutely impressive and I aspire to know a fraction of what some of you know.  

 

As it stands, I spend at least one month a year in Japan (my wife is Japanese - family is from Odawara), and am planning on purchasing a high quality sword next trip (December 2022). So, I may chew on some ears so as to sharpen my scouting skills. 

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On 7/13/2022 at 1:12 PM, Toryu2020 said:

Welcome Z -

I wonder if that person was Ralph Bell? Regardless enjoy your journey!

-t

Hi Thomas,

 

I do believe Ralph Bell is the guy.

 

Is he still around?

 

 

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  • 3 weeks later...

Heya. I'm gonna cut to the chase and be completely honest here: I fell in love with nihonto because I'm a massive weeb. My first exposure to nihonto was Touken Ranbu (which I am still a fan of) but rather than being content with staring at "swords" in the form of anime characters, I've also started to shift my attention to the actual swords themselves. So yes my view of nihonto is probably warped to hell and back, but I'm here to change that. Maybe one day I'll be able to attend a nihonto auction of some sort as an expert though the chances are pretty slim. Still, the knowledge of what makes a good sword and the ability to appreciate one would be incredibly valuable to me. 

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Hello, everyone.
I hope you're all doing well. 
I know I'm introducing myself rather late, but better late than never, correct? 
I'm interested in nihonto and the military culture of Japan from the Heian to the Showa period. Although I started talking to people who deal in nihonto and started learning the very basics of the blades a long time ago, it is only now that I started to seriously study them. Thus, I'm kind of new to this, and would definitely appreciate books or articles or resources in general. 
Although studying nihonto seriously will be hard for me- because I cannot concentrate much, and I don't remember very well at the moment- they are definitely something I want to learn more about. Maybe someday, I can even own a nihonto. 
Thank you for reading my rather long and rambling message. 
I hope you have a wonderful day. 
 

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