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Grass writing oh boy


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This may be totally wrong in some essential aspect, but just to get the ball rolling... please feel free to adjust!

 

Excellent for (killing and?) severing the heads of your dead uncouth enemy, this blade is full of promise.

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I got something a little different:
‘At the desire of this sword, a ruffian was killed by having their head truncated which served them right!’
(野人死て頭を打ち切り様見也、此刀所望す) 

 

野人 - countryfolk/ruffian/ civilian

死て - to die

頭を打ち切り- head was truncated

様見也 - serves you right/ see what happens 

此刀 - this sword

所望す- desire/request/wish

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Tachimei as well.  This a very interesting sword indeed, thanks for showing it.  Kudos to Morita san and other efforts.  Considering the translation work it would be nice if we could see a suite of photos of the entire sword - blade full length, koshirae full length, with closeups of tsuka etc etc etc. 

 

BaZZa.

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Oh wow! I'm totally lost on grass writing, so that was very impressive Mr. Morita! Thank you so much.

 

I also would love to see the rest of the sword, as well as the fittings. With two plugged holes in the tang, it definitely must have had an interesting history. If only it could talk.

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Here are a couple of quick photos.  This sword was shortened by—at least—4 inches.  So it would have been at least 30 13/16” originally.  Having said that, I suspect that the bottom mekugi-ana may not have been the original one.  If that is in fact the case, it was originally at least 34”+.  
 

 

 

—Matt

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Matt,

Thanks for presenting this sword. Unfortunately, it arrives to me as a rather unsavory message about "the soul of the samurai." Basically, this sword seems to have been used to kill a peasant. And the thug who did the murder bragged about it. Sorry, but this ain't art. It reflects the worst of pre-modern Japanese society.

Peter

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I had interpreted it more as a ruffian or bandit attempted to rob or kill the owner but chose the wrong person and found his head separated from his body. Stories like this were (and still are) popular and strengthening for people dealing with marauders while trying to go about their business.

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