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Late model War Mounts 1944 Date

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Any one know about this sword ?

not sure if it’s worthwhile since it’s a late model but it’s star stamped  don’t know if the smith is any one  or if it’s rare I added some documentation 

 

 

Steve 

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Thanks for translating it

but is he a known smith is This sword worthy and rare I could get it for 2777 but was hoping for some opinions if I bought it

 

Steve

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Any others have additional information about this sword ?
I don’t want to spend money and find out later I made another big mistake!! I did get info from others on the thread and I did aquire a description from fuller and Gregory but any other opinions would be greatly appreciated 

 

steve 

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Steve,

You may not know if you don't have it, but does it have stamps on the nakago mune?  Could I get a photo with the star visible?

 

Also, one of the double painted fitting numbers "069" and "189".  Re-mounted at some point in the war?

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Late model or not, it is star-stamped, which is indicative of it being a gendaito. But the koshirae is definitely interesting and appears to match the book.

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According to Markus Sesko the civilian name of the Kanemoto who made your sword was Motomura Kensaku. He was born in 1907 and studied from 1924 under 3rd generation Muto Hisahiro. He worked as a Rikugun-Jumei tosho which should tell you a lot about your sword if you did a little searching about star stamps.  It also appears he entered the 1941 sword competition, but I'll let you find out how he placed since you have a copy of John Slough's book Modern Japanese Swordsmiths 1868 - 1945.. 

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Was  Motomura Kensaku th name i she be looking for ? Not sure which one I’ll dive a little deeper

all in all I guess it’s by a known smith and was tamahagane used being star stamped ? I’m also guessing it’s rare? I never saw another that style I’m hoping I did ok since I haven’t had much luck lately 

 

steve

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Hi Bruce not sure if there are others since I don’t have it in hand but I will try and find out If more stamped 

 

steve

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Ok, thanks!

 

This version is not common, so toward the "rare" side of the collecting category.  Here's another with a star-stamped (seems to be a pattern here?) Munetoshi:

2001dec01munetoshi-1.jpg

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Hi Bruce what make it more uncommon on rare side? Because it’s not drilled for a suture?

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Got it what exactly makes it last rage version the wait it sits ? I think I did ok on being the rarer

version I wonder how many were made?

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Since it’s more uncommon how many different versions were there and what makes this one more rare?

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The family name of the swordsmith who made your blade is Motomura. He is listed in the names of the 1941 exhibition participants as "Motomura Kanemoto (Saga)". There were two WWII swordsmiths who used Kanemoto as their art name so don't get them mixed up. I think you are misunderstanding the concept of rare when it comes to the mounts your blade is in. Late in the war Japan was running out of essential materials and in order to save materials needed for the war effort, they simplified the scabbard and mountings in the last couple of years of the war. After using the type 98 mountings for most of the war, then they switched over to the Rinji style. Since it was only used for a couple of years at the end of the war, it's not as common as the type 98, but still there were plenty of the Rinji style made, so personally I wouldn't call them rare. Less common would be a better term.

 

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Steve, there's a lot of good reading about the Rinji seishiki.  I'd start with Nick Komiya's articles:

 

Unveiling Rinjisiehsiki Sword 1940

Legally Rebutting existence Type 3 Sword

Deflating Another Myth Type 3 Army Officer Sword Expanded Version

 

There weren't any "official" versions of the model, but you'll see:

"Standard" version with light tan saya, usually showato blade

"Custom" version with textured, dark saya, 2 Release buttons, usually with gendai blade

"Late war" version like yours, turning out to have, so far, gendaito

"Manchurian/Island" made Rinji, with low quality blade

"Manchurian Mantetsu" unique version with Mantetsu blade

 

That's how I would summarize them.

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Rikugun and Kaigun Jumei Tosho List

star.jpg 
Y : Yasukuni Tosho 
hi found him in this star stamped also why would it be a lower quality blade if it’s star stamped 

 

great information thanks I will check it out 

 

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You might have mis-read my list.  I said the late-war version, like yours, seems to have gendaito - that mean traditionally made.  No comment on quality, though since it's RJT, it's probably good-high quality (personal opinion, in general).

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Steve, this sword in question is in fairly uncommon mounts. Being late war, the fittings are very basic, pressed metal, with no detail. If the blade is in good condition, it is a very collectable sword. 

I would also suggest that your posts are more appropriate to be posted in the MILITARY section. 

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