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Show us your nice Gendai blades


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I know we have a separate topic of Show Us Your High Class Gunto. But many WW2 swords smiths have made nice traditionally made blades from 1876-1945. With members like "mecox" doing spectacular research on WW2 sword smiths, I think this new topic could throw some light on some sword smiths and their work, and hopefully kindle interest in the blade, not just the Koshirae. You never know, we may find some rare or poorly documented swords and smiths. 

If your posts could be supported by photos, oshigata, descriptions, and any other relevant information, I think a great reference topic could be established. 

OK, so here is a contribution to kick things off.... A (Mano) MASAYASU medium-grade grade gendaito, no date no stamps, in early '98 mounts. Mei reads Bishu ju Masayasu. 

The hada is flowing masame/mokume, with choji gunome midare hamon. 

I only hope there are better photographers out there! 

So I would ask the forum administrators to let this thread run, and see where it goes, a lot of time is spent discussing Chinese fakes, and machine made Showa-to, and I am sure this topic will help raise intertest in Gendai.  

P.S.   Hamon looks Suguha in photos, but the Keisho polish disguises the features, easily seen in  the hand. 

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Really nice blades Brandon, it would be great if you could show the Nakago on each, and describe the hada and hamon. I am hoping that in the future, if someone is searching YASUNORI for example, not just great photos, but information pops up as well. This could make for a very informative research site. 

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Most collectors are familiar with GENDAI swords made in the 1930-40's, but GENDAI swords show up made in the Meiji period. Here is a HIDENAGA signed Bungo no Kuni Hidenaga, and dated, Meiji 37, which is 1904.  It is in double hanger '94 mounts, has a 66cm blade, and pierced tsuba. 

Hada is Itame, Hamon is suguha/ko gunome, and looks to be made in the YAMASHIRO tradition.  

Not much is known about this smith, more is known about his father NAGAHIDE, who was a Castle samurai sword smith. 

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One of my favorites.

 

Masayoshi 正義
The sword is signed: Ryu Masayoshi Saku - A day in April 1944

Kosaka Masayoshi was a jo saku from the osaka zoheisho.
Nagasa 66,4 cm in rinshi seishiki koshirae (type 3) with a dark red urushi lacquered tsuka.

 

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This sword is signed... SHOSHIN KOBUSE GITAE MASAFUSA SAKU.... translated, (By means of) Kobuse forging Masafusa made this. It has no date, the only stamps are the SHINGANE IRI kokuin, and the.....

Registration of new design

Item number 211659

Wrapped steel construction     forged stamp. 

(Shoda) MASAFUSA is rated a 1 million YEN smith. And rated a medium to high grade gendaito. 

Born in 1916, his real name was Shoda Kihichi, in 1936 he entered the school of Fujiwara Kanefusa, and selected his art name of Masafusa.   

The original officer/owner of this sword went the full monty, with family mon, Iida latch/dust cover, and the tsuba appendage thought to retain a tassel. 

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A papered polished EMURA SAKU with no date in RS mounts. Emura was the Director of Okyama Prison during WW2. In fact, prison labour helped him with sword production, and polishing. Although Emura taught himself sword forging as a hobby, he made some really good swords, and was rated a medium to high grade Gendaito. The hamon is choji-gumome-midare, with small amounts of ara nie visible.  

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Thought I would post a three character (Ichihara) NAGAMITSU Saku, who regularly made swords for the Osaka Army Arsenal. His swords were rated very highly for their cutting ability. This has no date, but a very small mune stamp. 

He signed his swords in 2 characters, and upto 10 characters. Debate has raged about which signature represent the best quality swords, and those that are "knockouts" for the war. This sword has an Itame haha, and a nice hamon with ko-gunome with ashi. It is in as found war time polish, and the detail doesn't photograph well.

And Bruce, the fittings have heart shaped stamps, what can you tell me about this? 

Nagamitsu (and Emura) swords are becoming quite popular with collectors, and are now being papered.  

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11 hours ago, IJASWORDS said:

heart shaped stamps,

Neil,

Gorgeous blade and fittings!  For some reason, I really like the light tan canvas same'.  It adds something to the overall look.

 

Also, thanks for the serial number - Saka (Osaka Arsenal) 3798 .

 

Your "Broken heart" stamp is the 3rd I've seen, now.  I don't have record of where the first one came from, but he 2nd was on a RS rig with a Star-stamped blade in it.  So, at least 2 of 3 are Rinji-seishiki and RJT smiths.  Completely unknown as to the shop that was using that mark. Of course, the shape is called "Boar's eye" on the tsuba.  I wonder if this has some tie to that concept?  Your blade isn't star-stamped?

 

Sorry to distract from your beautiful thread!

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Neil i love those nagamitsu. I have one too. But your koshirae and blade looks like new. Incredible. :clap:

 

Rinji Seishiki koshirae would win every design price. Nearly 80 years old and never gets old. If the time of swords will come back - that would be my personel choice.

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Neil thanks for the pictures to compare emura and nagamitsu koshirae.

I never notice that the differencs between these type 3 so big. Compare the koiguchi, the ito-maki, the shape of the tsuka and the pattern of the urushi lacquered saya. 

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Thanks to Markus Sesko for the translation.  
 

Made as a gift for the Imperial Armed Forces of the Sino-Japanese War. Akiyama Chozaburo ( Recipient / bearer of the sword) Sword for the protection of the fatherland, carefully made by Yoshimasa, resident in karakuyanoseki in chikuzen.  On a happy day in October of the twelfth year Showa (1937)


 

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Adding 2 more cents to the thread :)

 

This is a very nice tachi by the gendai smith Hizen Tadaaki, dated 1940 (koki ni sen roppyaku nen), apparently this is a custom order (as per the nakago) mixing 2 different steels hence the high contrast in the layers. The sword has a very pronounced koshi-sori, at least one kirikomi on the mune and is stored in a top notch shirasaya with koppamaki and gold-wash habaki.

 

 

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