Jump to content
Sign in to follow this  
piryohae3

Taro Asano does a torture test on his sword

Recommended Posts

Contemporary swordsmith Taro Asano (Fusataro) recreates an Edo period torture test on his sword. He has his apprentice cut various objects including tatami mats, stainless steel bowls, deer antler, a piece of iron, hitting the mune with a heavy wooden sword, among others. My book about modern swordsmiths says that a common criticism of shinsakuto is that they concentrate too much on the art aspect. In this video he pushes his sword to the limit and beyond until it breaks, bends, and chips. I found it fascinating as I've never seen a test like this done with shinsakuto. People often tout the superiority of koto swords but it's only being evaluated on its appearance and not durability, edge retention, and such. I know nobody would do this with an antique but I wonder how swords of the various periods would stack up against each other.

 

 

  • Like 3
  • Thanks 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

At first I was worried, thinking that it was made by a smith that is no longer among us and I think that is why, most often, we are troubled when we see a sword being used. The idea of 'that is one less blade that will be around' but I found some comfort to know that this smith is alive and will be making more. It was also nice to see his elation at his sword performing, a bit like a proud father watching their child do something for the first time.

 

Edit: After having finished watching it. I think I understand why deer horn was used in many a kabuto now. That stuff destroys hardened edges like no one's business. I hope this blade will be reborn into a new blade. It is nice to see the smith having drawn some useful knowledge from this.

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoyed the video very much. However, his tests suffered from the poor placement of some of the objects.

they should have been placed probably on harder and more stable ground and stabilised / attached firmly. That way, there would not have been unnecessary vibrations and flip-outs. 
Notwithstanding all of that, his sword did very well. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Maxime,

ASANO TARO is different from many other Japanese swordsmiths in that he is very open-minded and willing to teach even Westerners about his craft. On YouTube, you can watch a number of videos if you search for FUSATARO or ASANOKAJIYA, and new videos can be found by this link:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoGGejL91Ck0ecftCNuiAKA/videos

Just today, I got a message from him announcing new English language videos (as I had suggested to him).

Send me a note in case you want to contact him.



 

  • Like 3

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
Il y a 2 heures, ROKUJURO a déclaré :

Maxime,

ASANO TARO est différent de beaucoup d'autres forgerons d'épées japonais en ce sens qu'il est très ouvert d'esprit et prêt à enseigner même aux Occidentaux son métier. Sur YouTube, vous pouvez regarder un certain nombre de vidéos si vous recherchez FUSATARO ou ASANOKAJIYA, et de nouvelles vidéos peuvent être trouvées via ce lien :

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCoGGejL91Ck0ecftCNuiAKA/videos

Pas plus tard qu'aujourd'hui, j'ai reçu un message de sa part annonçant de nouvelles vidéos en anglais (comme je lui l'avais suggéré).

Envoyez-moi une note au cas où vous voudriez le contacter.



 

thank you jean, I went to see the videos on youtube.
Very pleasant to see a blacksmith so pedagogue, and at the same time with a real thirst to explore. Perfect mix between tradition and modernity.
I keep your contact proposal under the elbow, because one day it could serve me well.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Has anyone invited him to join the board? I bet he could add a lot to some of the conversations here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

I enjoyed the video too.  I wonder if they would be willing to test some of the swords in my collection?  Have any of you seen the "forged in fire" show?  Modern knife and swordmakers compete with eachother using cutting tests.

 

https://play.history.com/shows/forged-in-fire/season-1/episode-1

 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
2 hours ago, ChrisW said:

Has anyone invited him to join the board? I bet he could add a lot to some of the conversations here.

Yes, I did so. 

Probably the language barrier is a little problem. 

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites
9 hours ago, ChrisW said:

Has anyone invited him to join the board?

I invited him, as well, after I bought one of his kitchen knives. He makes great knives, & considers himself too busy to participate.

 

Doubt that language would be a problem, Jean, as his English is very good.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Most modern smiths are fairly busy I am certain. A shame though, I am sure he could add a lot here.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...
Sign in to follow this  

×
×
  • Create New...