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Markdd

WW2 bring back

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Hi,

Was going to call it a Shin unto in the header but as its not in shin gusto fittings I'll leave as is.

This was my second sword many years ago that turned up locally from a house clearance when I saw it I had to have it , 4th seat at the 1941 exhibition.

Mark

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Very cool blade and nice fittings. Congrats!

 

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Hi,

will post a photo of the scabbard tomorrow ,appears to be a converted civilian one in a combat cover has some markings on it. why is it in such quality fittings with only a average blade.

Mark

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It's a late era blade with a Sho stamp, and so also non traditional in some way. No problem with the fittings, they are nice but would not have been expensive as they are contemporary to the blade and cast in non ferrous without inlays. The Fuchi-kashira might even be stamping's though the menuki look to be old.

 There seems to have been a fashion revival in the Showa era for traditional style swords. I like it, and think you have a very collectable piece there.

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Mark,

I assume you've gotten the smith name already, but just in case, I make it to be: 兼清 (Kanekiyo)

 

Also - no date on the other side?  If not, it is most likely 1940-41, though could be earlier or later, but the massive majority of Showa stamped blades are '40-'41.

 

To call it a shingunto would be appropriate.  It simply means "New Gunto" (gunto - army sword).  By the showa stamp, we know it's "New" and by the leather cover, we know it was brought, or sold, or donated to the army for the war.  So, it was a new, army sword!

B.E.A.Utiful blade, by the way! 

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Hi,

Thanks for the comments,

Had to have it polished as it was a shame to see it so dark, possibly wasn't financially viable to get it done but I'm sure it would have looked as nice when the officer first took it to war.No date to the other side.

Mark

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49 minutes ago, Dave R said:

 I do wonder why we get blades lacking a date, particularly  of WW2 era.

I have always wondered about that too.  Mal Cox' survey of 426 oshigata found only half had dates, and in my meager survey of around 200, only half are dated.

 

There are a higher percentage dated after 1942 when the Army took over all sword production.  Of the Seki stamped blades after 1942, 72 are undated and 62 are dated, compared to the Showa stamped blades where 102 are undated vs 26 dated.

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Has the loooks of civilian sword taken to war. Nice pick up hope the polisher knew what he was doing and didnt leave you a washboard.

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Mark 

 

if you live  in the UK and have been  collecting Japanese swords for sometime  , it is easy to recognize that type of lemon juice / acid polish , i believe he has retired now .

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hold the blade to a light bulb looking down toward the bulb you'll see if the plains are flat n smooth it was done right. if you see wavy or worse a washboard it was done by amateur. 

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To add to Stephen's post the light bulb image changes shape on a poorly polished blade but keeps the same shape on a well polished blade. The wavy parts distort the bulb image. We are double teaming them Oyabun!

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Similar to that indicated above, my favorite trick is to view the reflection of a Venetian blind or other surface with numerous parallel lines, and shift the reflection up and down the blade.  Even small waves become quite apparent.  But be careful, my as originally polished Showa Kumemune almost made me seasick!  :laughing:

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