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Happy New year ox tsuba


SalaMarcos
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Happy New year of the ox!

Maybe you've some tsuba or tōsōgu with an ox, I started this post showing this one made by the tsubakō/kinkō Ōkawa Chikō.

Mr. Ōkawa was student of Ametani Yūmin, who was student of Ikedo Minkoku, who was student of Unnō Shōmin (in my opinion, the best tsubakō/kinkō of Meiji jidai). Mr. Ōkawa also studied under Itō Masayasu, 17th generation of Edo Itō school, from whom received the 18th generation under the name of Itō Masanori. Because this tsuba is not in the specific Edo Itō style, Mr. Ōkawa signed with his gō Tōhōsai Masami, as well signed Kanō Yoshinobu in honour of the painter who made the design. The tsuba is also based in one made by Yoshioka Inabanosuke in late Edo period. Take look of the detailed work of kebori for the ox hair, it remind me Durer rabbits. Now 12 years ago, this tsuba was selected by the Tōken Hakubutsukan contest, as well exhibited there. Mr. Ōkawa Chikō made tsuba for each animal of the year, and most of it was also selected by the Tōken Hakubutsukan. At his 75 years old he still works at his small atelier in Saitama, and presents tsuba each year in the contest. 

IMG_3424 (1).jpg

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16 hours ago, SalaMarcos said:

Happy New year of the ox!

Maybe you've some tsuba or tōsōgu with an ox, I started this post showing this one made by the tsubakō/kinkō Ōkawa Chikō.

Mr. Ōkawa was student of Ametani Yūmin, who was student of Ikedo Minkoku, who was student of Unnō Shōmin (in my opinion, the best tsubakō/kinkō of Meiji jidai). Mr. Ōkawa also studied under Itō Masayasu, 17th generation of Edo Itō school, from whom received the 18th generation under the name of Itō Masanori. Because this tsuba is not in the specific Edo Itō style, Mr. Ōkawa signed with his gō Tōhōsai Masami, as well signed Kanō Yoshinobu in honour of the painter who made the design. The tsuba is also based in one made by Yoshioka Inabanosuke in late Edo period. Take look of the detailed work of kebori for the ox hair, it remind me Durer rabbits. Now 12 years ago, this tsuba was selected by the Tōken Hakubutsukan contest, as well exhibited there. Mr. Ōkawa Chikō made tsuba for each animal of the year, and most of it was also selected by the Tōken Hakubutsukan. At his 75 years old he still works at his small atelier in Saitama, and presents tsuba each year in the contest. 

IMG_3424 (1).jpg


Very beautiful! I especially love the elegance of the openwork tail turning into the stream. 

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Hi Marcos,

Here is one of mine.  Sorry, but the oxen is a little shy and is just being coaxed out of his barn with a bucket of food.  Its just a wakizashi mumei piece but in the theme of oxen.

What really made may day about your post was the reference to Ikedo Minkoku.  I have a tsuba inscribed Funakoshi Shunmin, and alternative name used by Minkoku, according to Sotherby's.  I've posted it before, it was one of the first that I bought.  It shows the famous story of the zen monk Tanka chopping up a wooden Buddha for firewood to keep himself warm while staying at the Yerenji in China during the 9thC.  I have never seen another tsuba by this artist, though museums (Boston, Brit) have tobacco pouch clasps and inro by him.  I was beginnings to doubt that he ever made tsuba (I'm not saying mine is genuine, but the workmanship is great and I've never seen the design elsewhere).  Thanks for the info.

 

Best regards, and happy New Year.  John 

Oxen 1.JPG

Oxen 2.JPG

Minkoku.JPG

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15 hours ago, JohnTo said:

Hi Marcos,

Here is one of mine.  Sorry, but the oxen is a little shy and is just being coaxed out of his barn with a bucket of food.  Its just a wakizashi mumei piece but in the theme of oxen.

What really made may day about your post was the reference to Ikedo Minkoku.  I have a tsuba inscribed Funakoshi Shunmin, and alternative name used by Minkoku, according to Sotherby's.  I've posted it before, it was one of the first that I bought.  It shows the famous story of the zen monk Tanka chopping up a wooden Buddha for firewood to keep himself warm while staying at the Yerenji in China during the 9thC.  I have never seen another tsuba by this artist, though museums (Boston, Brit) have tobacco pouch clasps and inro by him.  I was beginnings to doubt that he ever made tsuba (I'm not saying mine is genuine, but the workmanship is great and I've never seen the design elsewhere).  Thanks for the info.

 

Best regards, and happy New Year.  John 

Oxen 1.JPG

Oxen 2.JPG

Minkoku.JPG

Ikedo Minkoku was a great tsubakō, kinkō and ginkō formed in the Fine Arts University of Tōkyō where was taught by Unnō Shōmin, but after that he continued his formation with him at his atelier. The problem for Minkoku was the time where he lived, where tsuba orders were very few so, as many other artists, including Shōmin, he worked on incense pots, silver jars, tabakoire kagamibuta and so on. As Mr. Ōkawa told me, things were not easy as well for Minkoku student and Ōkawa san sensei, Ametani Yūmin, who mainly made rings, collars and obitori. Even Ōkawa san told me that, if you're not hired by a institution like Tōken Hakubutsukan or Bizen Hakubutsukan, is imposible to live as a tsubakō, so he also made jewelry till 50 years old. 

Congratulations about your tsuba. I think I saw time ago, in some auction a kagamibuta made by Minkoku and, regarding the piece, the price was so high, maybe because there is few works made and signed by him, do you're lucky. 

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