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Welcome Todd.

 

Yes, the terminology is a bit heavy-going for us new-starters!   It gets easier as you get more familiar, but I've got a couple of "Glossary" pages as shortcuts in my browser that I still have to use on a regular basis.

 

Jon

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Swords are indeed addicting, Todd, & since they've been around for a thousand years, there is quite a vocabulary that has grown up with them. Since you have a katana, I suggest that you go to the NMB home page, & click on Nihonto Info. Under that, you'll find a downloadable Kantei Sheet. Carefully strip your blade down, & start filling in the blanks. There's nothing like hands-on learning to get you familiar with terminology.

 

Welcome aboard.

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  • 1 month later...

Hi all, real name is Dave and I live in Torrance, CA. Been into nihonto study for some years; first blade was a WWII taken in combat on Guadalcanal--had a fascinating letter talking about how it was acquired.

 

Now that I'm older, the minutiae of this field continually amaze and motivate me. There's so much to learn, and the blades/swords are, in the main, works of art.

 

Okay before this descends into a febrile, maudlin moment, that's it. Cheers,

 

Dave

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Hi @Ken-Hawaii and all, thanks for the note! And, yes, I know the area you lived in!

 

The letter was a personal note to the new buyer (me). He was a corporal and had been issued the then-brand new M1 carbine. He wasn't too happy about that because A: he felt more comfortable with the 1903 and B, the M1 didn't mount a bayonet like the 1903 and the Garand. There was a small probing attack and his platoon was attacked by Japanese soldiers including an officer with the sword. The point man froze and didn't shoot, and it was this corporal with his semi-auto M1 who saved him--he said he hardly aimed, he was scared and just was shooting blindly as fast as he could and then it was over and the officer was down.

 

He claimed the sword. He survived the Guadalcanal campaign but was wounded and required surgery and shipped home. Later in life he took it apart and saved the pieces in a shoebox that was later lost or misplaced, so it had no fittings; just the blade, habaki and saya. It had two mekugi-ana. I do not remember now the mei/smith except that it was, theoretically, late Shinshinto vintage. I sold that blade to fund others, but it had a great story behind it and I always regretted it.

 

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Greetings everyone,

 

My name is Khalid and my username/gamer-tag is Cookie4Monstah. I'm from the Boston area in the United States where I currently reside. I can't wait to discuss the nature of the Japanese art sword with you. As a currator by hobby I come across a variety of militaria including nihonto and have decided to delve into the world of the Japanese sword. I have been fortunate enough to come across many edged weapons yet nothing compares to the masterful forgings and polishings of Japan. I do like Damascus steel too but not as much! Please feel free to reach out at anytime, especially if I can be of assistance to you.

 

Take care,

Khalid

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Hello all and Happy New Year, my name is John and I am based in the U.K.  I have had a vague interest in Japanese swords for awhile but only very recently, after acquiring a couple of swords, have I started looking into the subject in more detail and realising what a huge subject it is.  I have found this forum very educational and I have enjoyed reading the discussions, hence deciding it was time to create an account.

 

I am very new to this subject so please excuse me if I am still getting to grips with some of the terminology.

 

All the best,

John

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Hi John and welcome from another UK-based new-starter.

 

As you've already sussed-out, this is a great place to learn and get advice.  Advice can often be contradictory, but the fact that most members provide a good rationale for their views means that you (usually) get a good balanced argument on which to make your decisions

 

Cheers,

 

Jon

 

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Hello all happy new year. Im from the UK and a JSA practitioner for 10 years. I studied kendo, iaido and niten ich ryu form of kenjutsu (koryu). I was a member of the BKA British kendo association and stopped practicing due to work and study. 

 

I completed a masters degree in Japanese studies in 2018. And have been collecting replica  production swords since 2007.  I finally purchased my first nihonto this week, after saving up and almost 14 years of trying to avoid this dream of mine because of expense lol. 

 

But thanks to covid it left me with some income due to no holidays for 2 years. 

 

Saying how excited I am to receive my first nihonto ( koto, late muromachi period) is an understatement.

 

Take care all. 

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Welcome, Paz. I'm sure that you've found significant differences between your replicas & your Koto blade. Many of us on NMB are sword swingers (MJER iaido & Shinto-Ryu kenjutsu here), so we tend to appreciate how swords are really used. We look forward to your questions & contributions.

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27 minutes ago, Ken-Hawaii said:

Welcome, Paz. I'm sure that you've found significant differences between your replicas & your Koto blade. Many of us on NMB are sword swingers (MJER iaido & Shinto-Ryu kenjutsu here), so we tend to appreciate how swords are really used. We look forward to your questions & contributions.

 

Thanks Ken. I can assure you just by going through many nihontos and photos ,I'm already in awe of how superior they look to the hanweis of this world.

 

The first time I handled a nihonto it was day and night difference in weight and balance.  Look forward to contributing. 

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Welcome Paz! Be sure to post photos of your sword when it arrives. It is an unforgivable sin on this board to talk about new acquisitions without posting pictures. Welcome to this exciting hobby. 

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On 1/13/2022 at 3:51 PM, ckaiserca said:

Welcome Paz! Be sure to post photos of your sword when it arrives. It is an unforgivable sin on this board to talk about new acquisitions without posting pictures. Welcome to this exciting hobby. 

Hi Charles thanks,  I will.  My anticipation for my first nihonto is through the roof. 

Just waiting for the export papers. 

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6 hours ago, Paz said:

Hi Charles thanks,  I will.  My anticipation for my first nihonto is through the roof. 

Just waiting for the export papers. 

The waiting is the hardest part. On my last blade my heart sank every time I looked at the tracking information to see the package sitting in Anchorage, AK every day for three whole days. 

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4 hours ago, ckaiserca said:

The waiting is the hardest part. On my last blade my heart sank every time I looked at the tracking information to see the package sitting in Anchorage, AK every day for three whole days. 

 

I'm checking email inbox each time the phone vibrates,  especially as Japan time is our in bed fast asleep time Lol  

 

 

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