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  • 2 weeks later...

Good morning out of France,

 

Sebastien V. was so NMB addicted :D than I couldn't afford not to be a member. Here I am....

 

I am a Kodogu collector, mainly Tsubas, but interested in all kind of metal inlays, engraving ...

 

I collect them for more than 30 years now and want to continue my way to beter understand Who, When and How Japanese artists did such pieces of art. T

 

Thanks to you members, no doubt that your expertise will help me.

 

See you via this wonderfull forum, in the future....

 

Best regards

 

Bruno P.

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Hello to everyone,

 

after years of being a sleeper ( I am reading here since 2007) I would like to introduce myself. My name is Thomas and I am living in Essen, Germany.

I am interested in nihonto since nearly 30 years now. I started in books and find the first blades on antic markets and auctions. As many of you write - it`s the best to start with books, that`s right. First money spent in blades and tsuba was lost money.

I am still collecting books and from time to time a blade. I specially like tanto and yari, but also tsuba (Hi, Mariusz!).

I love this forum and it`s informations.

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Hello all. After posting a few mei's for translation and requesting and receiving valuable guidance and opinions, I stumbled across this thread. I would like to introduce myself. My name is Ben Myatt and I am new to the field of Japanese swords and Nihonto. I had the opportunity to purchase some Gunto swords, so after some quick research here and other sites, I was able to avoid mistakes (financial and otherwise). I quickly became interested in Japanese swords simply from the Mei translation (it took me two hours to figure out Saku). I've always enjoyed antiques and as an Engineer, fine manufacturing techniques, standardization, etc. So I guess these came together nicely. I also collect other items including: African and Haitian artwork and masks, antique fishing and hunting items, and old English and European beer steins/mugs.....naturally these all fit together right? :) . Thank you for allowing me to introduce myself and join this board. Hopefully I can add value.

Best regards,

Ben Myatt

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Hello Gentlemen,

 

After sometime lurking in the background, I would like to introduce myself. My name is A.J. Downey of Newberry, Michigan.

I am interested in the beauty of Nihonto blades, and the pursuit of perfection in their design/culture.

 

I am an artist myself, thou my media is wood more than metal, I can understand the drive these artisans had striving for the perfect blade with advances stretching thru generations. It is amazing to say the least.

 

I am slowly gaining knowledge from a recent book purchases "Facts And Fundamentals Of Japanese Swords", but truly enjoy the wealth of knowledge shared on this forum.

 

Thank you for the hours of enjoyment received and the many hours more to come. :thanks:

 

 

 

Regards

 

Andrew Jackson Downey IV

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  • 2 weeks later...
  • 2 weeks later...

Hello to all,

 

I'm Fabian, born and raised in the bavarian alps but living in lovely Liverpool since 2011.

A few weeks ago I rediscovered my childhood fascination with Japanese swords and would like to gain enough knowledge about the subject to eventually buy a sword. So being quite overwhelmed with the information, and impressed with the knowledge of the members here, I better get started, there is lots to read :)

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Hello Everyone,

 

My name is Kyle and I am new to this forum but ever since I was a kid I have been fascinated by Japanese culture and samurai style swords in general (especially after TMNT). This fascination didn't become wholly serious until my grandfather passed and was left a couple swords by him. At that point in time I reached out to this community for help in translation and dates on my swords and was completely overwhelmed on the respect and helpfulness from all of you. I have spent many hours on my own trying to research before coming to this forum which is absolutely life saving and I don't plan on slowing down on learning about WW2 swordsmiths in general and this community forum is a great place to start. Thank you

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  • 1 month later...

Hello NMB,

 

My name is Mike W. and I am a neophyte here at NMB. (sure wished I’d saved this before hitting submit the first time – which did not get posted but simply shuffled off to some nether world region of the internet; giving me some error message and forcing me to try and recall what in the heck I said on the first attempt, but I’m doing the cut and paste this time – fool me once only….)

 

I’m pretty much a neophyte at the art of the sword, but own all the books, took Iaido lessons for 2 years more than a decade ago, own a SwordStore purchased Japanese made Iaido and had all the funny pajamas too, (sorry can’t remember what we call ‘em) . I do own many commercial branded katanas, wakizashi and tantos as steel and firearms have always been my first love and an addiction I'm not interested in giving up till I'm dead.

 

Purchased my first koto sword in 2010 from Nihontocraft, (Danny), it’s a Bungo Sadahiro, (hence my handle) , mei Sadahiro Saku, late Kamakura circa 1300, unpapered with sayagaki and old polish by Honami Koson in October of 1940. The second, from the same source, is a papered Sandai Nanki Shigekuni, NTHK Kanteisho Shu Saku, Yoshikawa Kentaro Sensei, Genroku circa 1688-1704 and while I understand some of this I just typed, I’m hoping at some point that some of the smarts around this place will rub off on an old hick from Texas.

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Hi there,

 

Laurent from Switzerland.

I already nick here, who provided me with a few items.

 

I collect Japanese antiques in general, but lately focusing more on blades and armors.

 

Here to learn more and get more proficient with blades. Might use your knowledge at some point :)

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  • 2 weeks later...

Hello all,

 

I'm Jim and I am a firearms appraiser for an auction house here in Indiana.

 

I am sorely lacking in knowledge on Japanese knives and swords so I have come here to learn, and if possible- to contribute.

 

If anyone needs firearms info, please feel free to ask or to PM me and I will do all I can to assist. I have 40+ years of experience in the firearms field.

 

Thank you.

 

Jim

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I finally found this thread!

Tiaan Burger, bladesmith, blacksmith, overqualified knifemaker, now exploring the fine art of tosogu. I speak Metal, Afrikaans and English, in that order, which means most of the writing on this forum makes head hurt. So, a great big thanks to all the guys who post photos!

 

Well, pleased to meet you, looking forward to a long and happy stay.

 

Tiaan

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  • 3 weeks later...

Hello everyone; I have been a member here for a few years, but have not posted, just observed. My name is Lloyd Flemming, I enjoy collecting and studying Nihonto, introduced to kendo as a student of Shorin-Ryu many years ago. I live in Canada, and am a member of the Japanese Sword Society of Canada, (JSSC), a reputable organization, although of late there seems to be some unsubstantiated negativity expressed. I am now semi-retired from a career in electronics and electrodynamics research and development, providing more time for activities like the more serious study of Nihonto for the last 5 years, by way eventually of the JSSC N.T.H.K. novice and advanced courses. I am currently researching and correlating the Kongobei swordsmithing group (Moritaka, Morikuni and many more.), primarily prior to Kamakura which is virtually undocumented through to sue-Koto. I find some Kongobei work absolutely beautiful, even into sue-Koto. If anyone is aware of information outside the mainstream books, or references to the Kongobei warrior monks, I would certainly appreciate any input.

 

Lloyd Stanley Flemming

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