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Oldman

Tsuba i.d.

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As David wrote, Kinai, left side reads Kinai saku (made), right side Echizen (no) Ju or 'living in Echizen (province)'

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Michael,  I had a closer look,  please check if this may be cast.....hit with a steel object...does it "ring" or "clunk"?

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Thanks very much all. While my tsuba certainly looks very similar to the one that was listing on Yahoo, the sekigane and tagane ato are different. I don't see any indicia of it having been cast; no porosity, no flashing. I'm reluctant to hit it with anything hard. Cheers, Michael S.

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Hi Michael,

Go on - give it a whack with a hammer😄...but seriously, I agree with you, nothing there to indicate it's cast. More importantly, I think Ford would have mentioned it if there had been anything untoward to his expert eye.

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Michael, the Kinai 'school' was well known for its production of Aoi pattern guards, they were produced in some numbers and as usual in various states of quality. Yours shows no casting signs, but I would agree the Mei looks 'hasty'. A large number are from 'student' craftsmen who happily signed their work with the masters name. Yas's example only goes to prove the numbers made. Another two examples with the same signature.[sorry for the partial image]

image.png.3764b92766586d426df1da84cccc56c8.png image.png.33120d231556e82adae0788698695913.png

Another similar to yours [ura view] and an even more common version. [the right hand pattern are so common they are still being copied]

image.png.7fb378fdb7ac39049c8c00b8dfeafae6.png

 

One going on auction now as well.    https://www.jauce.com/auction/s784060301 image.thumb.png.46654c24467905ccfb3ac07f655d7b5a.png

I hope the images are of some use for comparison. [As you noted the nakago-ana is the fingerprint and the tagane-ato are the clincher for  individual guards.]

Regards Dale.

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I agree with Dale. The sixth generation Takahashi-Kinai was named in 1809 and died in 1821. The two Aoi leaf openwork tsuba are said to have been made by him. However, there are so many tsuba with Mei in the 6th generation that Japanese collectors call them "丁稚記内 (apprentice-kinai)" mass-produced by apprentices.
They include foundry products and replicas of the new era, but if you follow the rules of kinai, they don't worry about the details.

六代丁稚記内二ツ葵鍔.jpg

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