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Opinions about new acquisition

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Don't have it in hand yet, and there are no papers.  I have a guess what school it is based on a previous acquisition.  Any and all thoughts as to the school or maker will be greatly appreciated!  Cheers, Bob

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Awa shoami?

   Rounded off squarish shape. Matching hitsu ana. Western Japan feeling to the rendering.

 

 

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Very nice tsuba. 

 

Oddly enough I have a wari-kogai also in shinchu made by A-Shu Hara Takatada 阿州 原 孝忠+花押 which I know nothing about. To be exact I know nothing about any Kinko in Awa, if it is the same Awa that we are talking about.

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The thing in the water is definitely a crescent, representing the reflection of the moon on the water.

Another eyxample from Varshavsky-Collection:

 

varshavsky-coll_monkey_moon.jpg.9722440fa57bce53fc33d6edf3bfe3a3.jpg

 

Best, Florian

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The moon in water, as both reflection upon and motif for spiritual teaching, also has a long history in a number of Koryu (Old School Martial systems).

 

Probably the best known example attributed to Miyamoto Musashi doesn't even have the moon displayed pictorially, just powerfully executed Kanji.

 

 戦氣  Sen Ki -  War Spirit

寒流帯月澄如鏡  Kan-Ryuu-Tsuki-o-Obite-Sumu-Koto-Kagami-no-Gotoshi  "The moon in the stream on a cold winter night appears as clear as a mirror."

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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Thanks guys.  I had assumed that it is a "mikazuki"(三日月) or "third day moon".  

 

The significance of this is that it specifically represents a crescent moon, which comes on the third day of the lunar month (preferably for swords in August).  

 

This theme often pops up.  The famous Sanjo Munechika blade is often called "Mikazuki Munechika" because it has uchinoke, which is a hamon feature that looks like a crescent moon (see Markus Sessko's blog on this:  https://markussesko.com/2015/05/29/kantei-3-hamon-boshi-1/).  

 

Occasionally, makers will carve a mikazuki in the tang of their swords.  I happen to have one of these made by Taikei Naotane that has been discussed on NMB in the past.  

 

What I don't know, and hope that somebody can tell us, is why the crescent moon has significance to the Japanese?  

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It requires the use of one of those odd stances where the knees are braced inwards rather than outwards. If I remember correctly it gets its name from the crescent movement of the front foot required when moving in stance. 

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The Third day moon is an auspicious symbol. Beyond that you almost have to look at the entirety of Japanese Mythology and Iconography - it comes up in so many legends. The rabbit of Inaba, the moon and it's reflection, Yamanaka Shikanosuke Yukimori, just to name a few...

-t

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It requires the use of one of those odd stances where the knees are braced inwards rather than outwards. If I remember correctly it gets its name from the crescent movement of the front foot required when moving in stance. "


Absolutely correct John.


When Funakoshi Sensei named both the stance Hangetsu Dachi and the Kata Hangetsu back in the 1930's, it was a result of the Butokukai putting pressure on all Martial Arts groups to make things Japanese, hence the original form which was from Naha - Te,  was known as Sanchin Dachi and the basic form of the Kata was Sanchin and the advanced form was Seisan.


And also in Shotokan, there is a Crescent Kick known as Mikazuki Geri, literally three day moon kick.

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Hi Barry,

That's a great technique, applied crisply and with loads of kime, in my case, I mostly end up flat on the floor!!

Still what do they say?

"Nana korobi, ya oki!"

🤪

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