Jump to content
rkg

yet another theme question - this time akikusa and suzumushi

Recommended Posts

Hi again,

Here's another dumb theme question.  Does the combination of akikusa (fall flowers) and suzumushi (bell cricket) have a legend, story or some other meaning that they're both found in the fall?  Again, I'm trying to write up something, and...

Obligatory eye candy images of the theme:

 

kashira_comparison.thumb.jpg.e5a607c2ce29c05fb23fd573f1442ed2.jpg

Thanks in advance,

rkg

(Richard George)

 

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The seven flowers of autumn are often depicted with the bell cricket (Suzumushi) 

Flowers are indigenous to Japan. Bush Clover hagi, Japanese Silver Grass susuki, Japanese Arrowroot kuzu, Pink nadeshiko, Valerian ominaeshi, Joe Pye Weed fujibakama, and Balloon Flower kikyo.

_20200621_002745.JPG

_20200703_180246.JPG

  • Like 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ko-Mino and Mino f/k sets.   Same question applies to deer.

I associate the bell crickets more with late Momoyama Ko-mino on into Edo, but that may end up being entirely my own view.

 

This set has little silver beads imbedded in all the flowers, though hard to see unless you expand my so-so photo. We can't all be at RKG's level.

Ko Mino fk 001.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Hi Richard,

I think Adam said it best, an Autumnal association with flora and fauna. Here is a description found in the study of Akasaka motifs"

"The motif of this tsuba is autumnal flora and crickets combining to represent the Musashino. The elements of the grass and cricket fuse into an abstracted depiction of a pleasant autumnal scene:" Maybe this helps. BTW here is the tsuba this is referring to

Best Regards,

Mark

Akasaka Bell Cricket (2).jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

"Akikusa-zu" is said to be the theme of Rimpa school, which is a pictorial expression of a passage of "Laozi" "中秋良夜瓢風驟雨"   Meaning that unnatural events do not last long .

However, I don't know if it is the same expression in Mino School.

 

 

俵屋宗雪「紙本金地著色秋草図」.jpg

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Thanks for all the replies!  I'll follow up on these observations.

 

Best,

rkg

(Richard George)

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Ko-Mino and Rinpa are concurrent.

Given the nature of the times, the Memento Mori <-> Mushashino explanation makes sense.

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The Suzumushi started about 10 days ago. They really do sound like little bells. I recorded them one evening! And the cool evenings they bring with them are sooooo refreshing at last, after weeks of stifling heat and incessant cicadas.

 

  • Like 2
  • Thanks 1

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

The themes suzumushi, akikusa, Musashino and nozarashi sometimes overlap in some instances. Anyway each theme has its own origin in Japanese literature.
According to "Tsuba - Kodōgu Gadai Jiten" (vol. 1, p. 278) the suzumushi-zu refers to "‎The Pillow Book" (Makura no Sōshi - 枕草子) by Sei Shōnagon, a collection of writings from Heian period.
Here below the relevant entry from "Tsuba - Kodōgu Gadai Jiten" :

Suzumushi.thumb.jpg.3b7b7960b269f230cd6554ab0f695453.jpg

  • Like 2

Share this post


Link to post
Share on other sites

Join the conversation

You can post now and register later. If you have an account, sign in now to post with your account.

Guest
Reply to this topic...

×   Pasted as rich text.   Paste as plain text instead

  Only 75 emoji are allowed.

×   Your link has been automatically embedded.   Display as a link instead

×   Your previous content has been restored.   Clear editor

×   You cannot paste images directly. Upload or insert images from URL.

Loading...

×
×
  • Create New...