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EdWolf

The works of Gassan Sadakazu

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Thanks Ed for sharing the link.  I have a sword very similar to the last tachi discussed, which is an utsushi of Masamune.  I read somewhere that he practiced making this sword three or four times and picked the best one to give to the emperor at the coronation.  I assume that I got one of the warmup blades.  

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Here are a couple shots of mine, including the sayagaki by Hon'ami.  

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Uwe,

 

Beautiful, but is it SADAKAZU II and not SADAKAZU I???  The OP's link is to SADAKAZU I and I thought that was the theme of the thread??  Or have I lost the plot??? (Lovely bottle of Shiraz with dinner...)

 

BaZZa.

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Nah..it's still a great link and worth checking out.

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I think that Uwe's posting is Sadakazu I, isn't it?  I think it says Teishitsu Gigein, which was only his designation.  

 

David, that is a real beauty and must have been made in the early 20th century.  When did the Minatogawa shrine/forge open?  For some reason I associate it with WWII.   I imagine it is very unusual to have the Minatogawa Mon on a Sadakazu blade!   Are there any others?  

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Some shots of the hada of the one I posted that is an utsushi of Masamune.   Not your typical Gassan hada!

 

 

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While we are on the subject.... A tanto made around the same time.

 

 

 

 

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Robert, it was made in 1888. It's brother, who I mentioned is in HWs book, is a photo from the Shinshinto Meikan.  The signifigance of the Kikisui, eludes me.

I also have a Sadakatsu, who's brother is also in HWs book.   This one has the Kikisui as a horimono on the blade with two other Kanji as Horimono on the other side of the blade.  I'm led to believe that, 6 blades were commissioned by the Minotagawa Jinja in 1933 and presented to senior naval officers.

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I am perplexed with the distinct variance's in the Sadakazu mei.  Maybe my eyes are on the bum?  Peace.

 

 

Tom D.

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I am perplexed with the distinct variance's in the Sadakazu mei.  Maybe my eyes are on the bum?  Peace.

 

 

Tom D.

I agree. Even his kakihan isn't standardized.

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Ed, forgive my gross ignorance, but are Sadakazu & Sadakatsu just two attempts to spell the same name? Fuller lists him as Gassan Sadakatsu.

 

Thanks!

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Began with Sadayoshi, then Sadakazu, Sadakatsu, Sadamitsu ( Sadakazu 11).

David, do you mean that those are a progression of names a single smith went through, or are those a line of smiths?

 

Sorry for the Newbie questions! I just have the Sadakatsu kakihan in the Stamps document, and I'm trying to figure out if I've named it correctly, or if there was a succession of guys with slightly varied kakihan.

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 post-355-0-35297100-1590558030_thumb.jpg

Sadakazu II called himself Sadaichi out of respect for Sadakazu I (same kanji, different reading)

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Bruce, to make things a bit more complicated, during his waning years, Sadakazu had a lot of help from his son, Sadakatsu.  I recall reading that the way the kakihan is done is a giveaway as to whether Sadakatsu was the actual maker, but can't confirm that without digging in the books.

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Come visit us in Chicago sometime Ken.  I would love to show you the collection and get your thoughts.  Cheers, Bob

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