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masondj

Flaws on a wakizashi

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Are these acceptable flaws on a wakizashi from Muromachi period (Mumei)? What do you think? I think Michael from the other post mentioned about the flaws from Muromachi deduct its value accordingly.

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Yes flaws will detract from value, however a generally tired blade is more accepted from Muromachi or prior. I don't see anything too alarming here. Looking quite nice ????

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The older a sword is, the more likely it will have flaws. As Mike says, on blades from muromachi or earlier the flaws are more acceptable. I know of an ubu Ko-Naminohira (Heian Period)with no temper in the boshi that the NBTHK had no trouble giving a paper. The NTHK will not paper these types of blades though. 

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Flaws within the hamon certainly detract visually and value wise, and in terms of restoration you would have to learn to live with them. Above the hamon flaws sometimes can be tightened up by the polisher, and sometimes they'll open up under polishing. Once again, it's best to understand the NBTHK standards for papering and how they would apply to the sword in question. In that way you can at least make somewhat of an informed decision, evaluation. 

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This is the only one that bothers me, but as everyone above says, its all in the context of how much you paid for the sword, and what you expected out of the transaction. 

 

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Here you go Ken, I came across it on ebay when I was doing research on Mihara group from Muromachi period. You can check out other photos here: https://www.ebay.com/itm/SAYAGAKI-Attested-Japanese-Antique-Wakizashi-Sword-Samurai-Katana-Nihonto/254558920128?_trksid=p2485497.m4902.l9144 

 

It was sold just a few days ago for $890.


Mason, how about posting shots of the sugata, with a completely-bare blade?

 

 

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That's a major one for me too, Franco pointed out as well.

 

But polishing could potentially hide a few more flaws.

This is the only one that bothers me, but as everyone above says, its all in the context of how much you paid for the sword, and what you expected out of the transaction. 

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Indeed

Flaws within the hamon certainly detract visually and value wise, and in terms of restoration you would have to learn to live with them. Above the hamon flaws sometimes can be tightened up by the polisher, and sometimes they'll open up under polishing. Once again, it's best to understand the NBTHK standards for papering and how they would apply to the sword in question. In that way you can at least make somewhat of an informed decision, evaluation. 

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When it comes to Koto blade, I guess the acceptable standards include more or less some forms of minor flaws in the not-too-pricey category. 

“Acceptable” depends on the price, the attribution... and you.

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It's stated ubu on the sayagaki :o

 

It looks ubu to me. I can't see any evidence of shortening - there's only one mekugi ana and if you look at the close-up of the nakago there's room for a habaki between the sabi giwa and the machi but nothing more, so not machi okuri. 

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I wondered why Ken said that, until i saw that the hamon runs into the nakago.

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the way it runs into the nakago makes you wonder  :o

I wondered why Ken said that, until i saw that the hamon runs into the nakago.

 

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You are quite right Ken, I've rotated the photo. And now the sugata tells the truth, isn't it?

 

Can't trust what was written on the sayagaki :(

 

Mason, how about posting shots of the sugata, with a completely-bare blade?

 

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If you consider the price, the flaws were totally acceptable to me. Whoever bought it had a good deal.

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