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nektoalex

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This is my favourite of the prints that I own. It’s a kabuki diptych by Kunisada.

The actors from left are Segawa Kikunojō V and Ichikawa Monnosuke III as Soroku nyobo Ohama (惣六女房おはま), Karaki Masaemon nyobo Otani (政右衛門女房お谷) in the play "Torimazete Sekison miyage", performed at the Ichimura theatre in July 1823; publisher is Enomotoya Kichibei.

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Thank you Ben, 

 

Doubly interesting subject matter, because we almost have the concept of Onna Bugeisha, which we mentioned earlier in the thread, as the print depicts two women engaging  in what must surely be mortal combat.

 

I suspect there is a more than little of "Hell hath no Fury" for one of the parties involved in the altercation.

 

Katana v Bangasa?

 

My money's on the one on the right!!

 

:)

 

PS, There's maybe a clue in the position of the Obi knot on the figure on the right, are we venturing into the distinction between Gaiko and "Belle de Nuit"?

 

 

Any thoughts Piers or Steve?

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Two surimonos featuring women and a child.

 

The one on the left is by Tesai Hokuba.

I was not able to identify the maker of the surimono on the right, nor its subject (any idea of what they are doing ?).

 

Bernard D

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Good morning Bernard,

 

I have tried to fathom out what the tool is in the second image.

 

At first, observing that it was making something into a spiral, as evidenced by both the extrusion from the machine and  the second example on the floor by the hasami scissors.

 

I looked for spirals and the mosquito wheel came too mind briefly and was discarded.

 

However, the white sheet that the second woman holds, may be the clue.

 

It looks like a bolt of cloth

 

I wonder if the machine  is for turning out V shape cross section lengths of material for inner edging in Kimono?

 

Or like the folded cotton Itomaki that is found on so called Satsuma Rebellion Tsuka.

 

 

 

Your call Piers, as your knowledge of Arcane Edo period tools is legend.

 

:)

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This one had me stumped, but my wife thinks it may be some kind of wringer like on an old Western washing machine, for pressing dry lengths of edging cloth, as you say Malcolm, or Kampyo 干瓢, strings of dried calabash innards.

See Ukiyo-e print lower down the linked page:

 

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Kanpy%C5%8D_(food)

 

https://www.wikiwand.com/en/Kanpy%C5%8D_(food)

Tokaido50_Minakuchi.jpg?1590041190534

 

 

 

https://www.google.com/search?q=%E5%B9%B2%E7%93%A2&tbm=isch&source=iu&ictx=1&fir=HWWI_XRpOQXZ9M%253A%252CSdWB9WXyrv8CLM%252C%252Fm%252F0gptwc&vet=1&usg=AI4_-kRbrlk2s8RPn5hxYBlLL9485xxPnw&sa=X&ved=2ahUKEwjE24CIpMTpAhWb-mEKHfSvBVYQ_B0wE3oECAoQAw#imgrc=HWWI_XRpOQXZ9M:

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Good morning Piers,

 

Excellent call from your wife.

 

I'm not so sure about the Kampyo suggestion, as this looks to be rather a messy rural action, for the outdoors or the kitchen area.

 

These fine Ladies in their elaborate Kimono are, as the say here in Bath, "Bon Ton".

 

Closest I can get to an Edo period wringer is something called a Kinuta, a type of material dryer/ softener, involving one or multiple mallets:

 

https://data.ukiyo-e.org/artelino/images/39825g1.jpg

 

 

My thoughts would go to the Collections at both the Rekihaku Museum in Sakura, and the Edo - Tokyo Museum just down from the new NBTHK Hakubutsukan.

 

:)

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She did admit though that Kampyo was/is formed into spirals.

 

I agree regarding preparation of food and the inappropriate nature of the ladies' dress. This bothered us too. The scissors, and working in the evening by the light of the andon do rather suggest fabric. I did suggest edging, just like you, but could not get her to agree on that.

(And mosquito coils are an invention of later centuries.)

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Thank you for searching !

By the way, did you notice the clock on the wall in this surimono?

I have another little print (in a sad state :() featuring such a clock, with more details. As you probaly know, they are called "kake-dokei". Here is a link to a real one :

https://www.christies.com/lotfinder/Lot/a-Japanese-iron-framed-striking-kake-dokei-late-18thearly-4448865-details.aspx

 

Bernard D

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That one has a nice little note attached with 寛政 文化 年間 Kansei/Bunka Nenkan which is roughly the date given for the linked Christie’s clock!

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Apropos of nothing,

 

From the National Diet Library database, here's an illustrated book published in 1700 called Ayatsuri Ebansuke あやつり画番附. アヤツリ エバンズケ

 

It features, almost in Manga format, exploits of historic characters.

 

Many interesting illustrations:

 

In the link below, the image on the top right might be of some passing interest, possibly to one person living in Japan and two Vikings.... 

 

https://dl.ndl.go.jp/view/jpegOutput?itemId=info%3Andljp%2Fpid%2F2533295&contentNo=8&outputScale=4

 

This page is of NMB interest, unfortunately the forum settings won't allow me to upload the Jpeg directly:

 

https://dl.ndl.go.jp/view/jpegOutput?itemId=info%3Andljp%2Fpid%2F2533295&contentNo=18&outputScale=4

 

Here's the link to the complete book, which is also on my page "Pre Modern Japanese Books and Illustrations" over on Facebook.

 

https://dl.ndl.go.jp/info:ndljp/pid/2533295

 

 

 

:)

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Toyotake-Za, Ningyo Joruri... started in 1703? (The wife is shouting, 'Bunraku'.)

https://dictionary.goo.ne.jp/word/%E8%B1%8A%E7%AB%B9%E5%BA%A7/#jn-160552

 

The illustration you mention (ball wound in shoulder?) seems to show below it various roles, including six people playing the 三味線 Shamisen.

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Oh, the Ningyo bit!!

 

That's doubly interesting, depicting Teppo as a Home defensive method of Intruder attitude re - adjustment, and also as a subject of a Puppet drama.

 

Toyotake - za being a Bunraku theatre in Osaka:

 

https://wepa.unima.org/en/toyotake-wakadayu/

 

Re the  kamon useage on the pages, does this relate to puppet masters?

 

:)

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Malcolm, "intruder"? Haha, yes, maybe true. I thought the home owner was just fed up with the noise of his neighbour's drunken dancing.

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Here are 4 surimonos depicting rats/mice. The first one signed Zeshin, the others by unknown (at least to me  ;-) ) artists.

 

Bernard D

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