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nektoalex
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Hi Bernard,

 

Thank you for posting the prints from your collection.

 

Print two, the top circular stamp says Kiwame (Approved), the lower one is not on my list and may be a Nanushi (censor's mark) and may be a name ending in San or Yama.

 

:)

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This is the actor Kawarasaki Gonjurō (河原﨑権十郎) by Kuniaki (国明) from c.1861. 

 

I can't find this exact one, but I'm sure its from the series here

https://dl.ndl.go.jp/info:ndljp/pid/1301418?tocOpened=1

 

Seems to be super obscure. I can't even find a reference to the drama title

当春豊のあそひ 

Tōshun toyo no asohi(bi)?

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Playing Tadanobu Rihei.

 

See https://collections.mfa.org/objects/471359

 

and

 

白浪五人男(Shiranami Gonin Otoko) = lit. "Five Men of the White Waves"

• 赤星十三郎(Akaboshi Jūzaburō)

• 忠信利平(Tadanobu Rihei)

• 南郷力丸(Nangō Rikimaru)

• 日本駄右衛門(Nippon Daemon)

• 弁天小僧菊之助(Benten Kozō Kikunosuke)

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To tell the truth, I find this floating world of woodblock prints somewhat confusing. I have a folderful of various prints and paintings, but it is so hard to organize them and collate all the information intelligibly, quite apart from the fact that many of these artists had three or four different names or appellations.

 

In the West they are often framed and  sealed behind glass, which makes it difficult to get to grips with them from both sides. In the end each illustration gets a little Post-it note behind with scrawled info added at odd times.

 

Not meant as a criticism, though. I love them to gaze at, and much admire people who can keep them organized.  :thumbsup:

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Here's the artist Utagawa Kuniaki visiting the theme of the play again, this time in fanzine style:

 

https://ukiyo-e.org/image/mfa/sc152567

 

Also I just noticed that Tom's print has been cut down quite a bit on the left side, I think you can just see the edge of the Toshidama seal that would have read Kuniaki ga.

 

You can see the Toshidama seal cartouche which was the mark used in various forms by members of the extended Utagawa group of artists on SteveM's link to the NDL

 

https://dl.ndl.go.jp/info:ndljp/pid/1301418?tocOpened=1

 

Also the publisher is Kiku Ya Ichibei on the 3 shown at NDL and on Tom's.

 

MFA_Kikuya_Ichibei_Yoshitoyo_SC141329_de

 

An interesting detail is that the seal was used between 1830 and 1867, and was used on Kuniaki II prints also.

 

:)

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In fact, wooden blocks allow us to rearrange values ​​— not us for engravings, but engravings for us, which allows us to constantly see them without resorting, sometimes to the difficult and not always appropriate process of searching for an album and contemplating it, which is often done quite rarely- similar to a process with packaged swords that the owner has not seen for months ...

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Wow, so glad I posted that print. The wealth of knowledge of fellow NMB members is quite impressive. Malcom, you are absolutely right in your observation of a trace of the Kuniaki seal in the lower left edge of the print. I like the print even more now that I know about the story behind it. Many thanks to all who responded. Boku wa daibun ureshi.

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Show your picture of an Amabie and ward off pestilence!

 

Edo woodblock prints...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Amabie

 

And especially for Malcolm, how one trucking company has covered their lorry/truck sides.

https://headlines.yahoo.co.jp/hl?a=20200409-00000006-withnews-sci.view-000

https://news.yahoo.co.jp/pickup/6356713

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Excellent Piers, I have not seen that image before

 

There were also Aka - e (赤絵) lit - "Red Pictures" designed to ward off infectious diseases such as Scarlet fever.

 

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Aka-e

 

https://edo-g.com/blog/2020/03/infectious_disease.html/infectious_disease6_l

 

https://edo-g.com/blog/2020/03/infectious_disease.html/infectious_disease7_l

 

 

 

:)

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Hi Alexandr,

 

Your print looks to have been printed by Ebi Ya Rinnosuke

 

 Fiery_embers_Ebi-ya_Rinnosuke.jpg

 

The series Seichu Gishi Den was very popular as the artwork was particularly dramatic.

 

In the late 1970's a limited edition folio reproduction of selected original prints from the series was produced in the UK.

 

I believe it was a lithographic process, but the quality of reproduction was excellent.

 

:)

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Good afternoon everyone,

 

I have been going through my stock files and re - discovered this little gem lurking in the store room:

 

This is a reduction printing (c.1918) of an existing woodblock series, in this case by the genius Tsukioka Yoshitoshi (1839 - 1892), who many modern illustrators feel to be the father of Modern manga.

 

Originally referred to as Kinsei Kyogi Den or "Stories of chivalry in recent times" was produced by Yoshitoshi in 1865/66.

 

Here is a link to the series in the amazingly detailed online Yoshitoshi catalogue raisonné  by J. Noel Chiappa and Jason M. Levine :

 

http://www.yoshitoshi.net/series/biographies.html

 

The talented translator William Wetherall made an in depth study of the series in 2005, they say "steal from the best", so here is a link which speaks volumes:

 

http://www.nishikie.com/articles/Kinsei_kyogi_den.html

 

This is my copy, still in its original (though slightly "Country House") box, which has protected it for just over 100 years:

 

post-549-0-59680800-1586518795_thumb.jpg

 

post-549-0-06474900-1586518847_thumb.jpg

 

post-549-0-30671800-1586519012_thumb.jpg

 

post-549-0-17917700-1586519036_thumb.jpg

 

:)

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Here's another Kuniyoshi print, from my collection (sorry for the reflection on the photo).

 

Triptych : Wada kassen : Yoshihide Sōmon wo oshi-yaburu: Asahina Saburō Yoshihide breaking down the great gate during the revolt of the Wada against the Hōjō.

 

Publisher : Yamaguchi-ya Tōbei.

 

Censor: Kinugasa-Murata

 

Date: Rat 6, July-August 1852

 

Ref. : Robinson T. 281

 

I like very much this triptych in its composition. We can feel the movement and power of Yoshihide...

 

 

post-3558-0-07818200-1586627829_thumb.jpg

post-3558-0-97239000-1586627839_thumb.jpg

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Good afternoon Everyone,

 

If there is such a thing as a Holy grail of Ukiyo - e subject imagery, then, currently, I would chose "The Last Stand of the Kusunoki at the Battle of Shijo Nawate".

 

I first came into contact with the event, a long time ago, on the cover of a paperback version of the late Professor Ivan Morris' masterwork: "Nobility of Failure: Tragic Heroes in the History of Japan".

 

So powerful are the images of the protagonists, framed amidst hail upon hail of arrows, in the crystal realisation that when all seems lost, and others have fled the Field, then one can chose to live a long life, Heroically in the moment, with no concern for the duration of that moment.

 

e408e69b424f1b2437e6dab07a6bb60d.jpg

 

AN00467628_001_l.jpg

 

Kuniyoshi_Utagawa-No_Series-The_Last_Sta
 

 

Gekko_Ogata-No_Series-Last_Stand_of_the_

 

Yoshitoshi_Tsukioka-No_Series-The_Last_S

 

 

Unknown_HisaBisaHide-A_new_selection_of_

 

I am drawn to the thought, that this is precisely what our Healthcare professionals are currently doing in ICU, Worldwide.

 

Brian, if you think this inappropriate, please move it to a more appropriate area.

 

Best regards

 

Malcolm

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Thank you Piers.

 

Update, also a group of Manga artists have contributed their own versions to social media, including this one from the Japanese Ministry of Health, Labour and Welfare:

 

200px-Stop_Kansen_Kakudai_Covid19_2020.j

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Hi Ray

 

I think the modern prints, Nos 1 & 2 from the left are by Katsuyuki Nishijima (born 1945)

 

Usually they are in numbered editions of up to 500.

 

First editions are usually pencil signed and named in the bottom margin.

 

They are very much collected, so please do not dismiss them.

 

I will leave the other two to other opinions for the moment, just to be fair.

 

:)

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Second from the left is:

 

 

 

豊春国周 Toyohara Kunichika c.mid-1870s?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Toyohara_Kunichika

 

theme is the play

沖之白波 當の入船 - Oki no Shiranami Tō no Iribune

featuring various actors

尾上菊五郎 - Ogami Kikugorō
助高屋高助 - Sukedakaya Takasuke
中村宗十郎 - Nakamura Sōjūrō
中村芝翫  - Nakamura Shikan 
市川左團次 - Ichikawa Sadanji
岩井半四郎 - Iwai Hanshirō
市川團十郎 - Ichikawa Danjūrō

 

 

 

And a sharper picture of the one on the right would help figure it out. I can't read any of the kanji on it. The box on the far left side of the left picture contains the actors' names, so that probably won't be as helpful as the writing in the middle picture or the far right picture. 

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