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Need help identifying the maker of this katana


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Wow. I can't wait to hear more about this sword.

That's the coolest menuki I've ever seen; and we can only see half of it.  Three toed dragon? And what is that mon(?) above the ana? It doesn't match the mon on the tsuka. Chiseled ana? Looks tachi from here, long and thin. I'm just guessing, since no one else has responded.

At least let me say : Don't touch the blade or clean anything!! Looks like your family has taken good care of it; and looks to be a really nice specimen. 

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Thank you everyone for the information behind this sword. I’ll take more pictures of the sword tomorrow to provide further detail.

 

The story I got from my Uncle is that my Great Grandfather was in the pacific as part of 6th ID, 1st Infantry Regiment and led a charge to take an enemy base, killing the enemy commanding officer and taking his sword. The flag in the photo was the flag of that base and was signed by his platoon and awarded to him for his gallantry and leading the assault to close with and destroy the enemy.

 

He never told us this story and we had no idea of the swords existence. He only spoke of it to my Uncle who fought in the 101st IR in Vietnam and was given the sword when he returned from being drafted into combat and serving 2 tours.

 

When I graduated college in 2005 I joined the service as an Infantryman with 4th ID and was deployed to Iraq. My Uncle had a conversation with me when I returned about what he and I had experienced and as he had no sons, he gave me the sword. We all brought back trophies but nothing like a family sword and I was told to give it to my oldest living son or any direct descendant of my Great Grandfather who serves in a combat role (if any of my cousins kids do then they’re kid takes precedence over mine unless my son serves in a combat role.)

 

I have never spoken about my experiences with my family and plan to do with our Family sword as my uncle did with me. As I have 3 girls who will NEVER serve in combat I am waiting to see if any of my cousin’s sons do. If they do, it will go to them, if not my oldest daughter will hold it until a later generation worthy can take it.

 

I couldn’t in good-conscience sell it but I very much appreciate the information from everyone. I had no idea that there was a whole forum dedicated to these items until I found Nihonto forum.

 

Thank you everyone who can help shed light on this heirloom!!

 

Cody J

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Thank you everyone for the information behind this sword. I’ll take more pictures of the sword tomorrow to provide further detail.

 

The story I got from my Uncle is that my Great Grandfather was in the pacific as part of 6th ID, 1st Infantry Regiment and led a charge to take an enemy base, killing the enemy commanding officer and taking his sword. The flag in the photo was the flag of that base and was signed by his platoon and awarded to him for his gallantry and leading the assault to close with and destroy the enemy.

 

He never told us this story and we had no idea of the swords existence. He only spoke of it to my Uncle who fought in the 101st IR in Vietnam and was given the sword when he returned from being drafted into combat and serving 2 tours.

 

When I graduated college in 2005 I joined the service as an Infantryman with 4th ID and was deployed to Iraq. My Uncle had a conversation with me when I returned about what he and I had experienced and as he had no sons, he gave me the sword. We all brought back trophies but nothing like a family sword and I was told to give it to my oldest living son or any direct descendant of my Great Grandfather who serves in a combat role (if any of my cousins kids do then they’re kid takes precedence over mine unless my son serves in a combat role.)

 

I have never spoken about my experiences with my family and plan to do with our Family sword as my uncle did with me. As I have 3 girls who will NEVER serve in combat I am waiting to see if any of my cousin’s sons do. If they do, it will go to them, if not my oldest daughter will hold it until a later generation worthy can take it.

 

I couldn’t in good-conscience sell it but I very much appreciate the information from everyone. I had no idea that there was a whole forum dedicated to these items until I found Nihonto forum.

 

Thank you everyone who can help shed light on this heirloom!!

 

Cody J

 

this is a great story and gesture Cody!

 

you can be proud of your great grandfather, uncle and yourself. I like to see a sword cherished like that! You and your family have all my respect!

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Makino being the famous Makino family.

I looked up Makino in the JEA and saw a Shiro Makino leading their 16 regiment and they ended battling with 6th Infantry (my Great Grandfathers group but the source said Shiro committed suicide (not killed as our family story was told) so not sure. May be his sword.

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Cody,

 

Thanks so very much for sharing this sword.  That's a wonderful photo of the gold dragon under the handle binding.  Would you mind taking a photo of the one on the other side, closeup like the one you've put up.

 

Thanks,

BaZZa.

aka Barry Thomas

Melbourne, Australia.

 

EDIT;  OOOOPS - I see it was in Cody's first batch of photos...  Sorry.

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Cody, rust on handle=good, rust on blade=bad. Owner wiping blade with oil=good, wiping with sandpaper, scotchbrite, steel wool, etc= BAD. Rust removal from the blade portion is done by trained professionals only. Good that you asked.

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Do you mean that having the blade professionally polished would affect the swords value?

Yes, absolutely. Assuming that it was going to be sold, a togishi polish would greatly-increase the blade's value. As it won't be sold, however, I doubt that a professional polish is needed. Just please follow the maintenance instructions in the NBTHK sword etiquette to keep it in good condition.

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Third Generation Iga no kami Kinmichi (around 1680). At first glance, mei seems shoshin. This sword deserves to be seen by a real expert to project to send it to shinsa

Pardon as I am new to this but what does Shoshin mean in this context? Do you mean that it looks like a beginners signature?

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  • 3 months later...

Takeo Seki in BC Canada and Shigekazu "Jimmy" Hayashi in San Francisco are both fully trained polishers. While Jimmy would be my first choice, Takeo would almost certainly have a shorter wait time for his service. I have used both polishers multiple times and highly recommend.

 

Also, the dragon menuki 'appear' to be of very good quality.  

 

http://www.nihontocraft.com/Jimmy_Hayashi_Sword_Polisher.html

Edited by nagamaki - Franco
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