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Cleaning Menuki


Tdognc
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Some will say you need to send them to a professional and spend a few hundred dollars to clean them. I do what Barry does and use an old toothbrush and soap if they need it.

Thanks for the info. I gently cleaned them with a toothbrush and some gentle soap. I then got out some high magnification glasses and I noticed there is some red lacquer on certain parts of the menuki. Could that be original to the pieces?

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Chill.
Don't make like the 2 are the same. A gentle brushing with a soft toothbrush and mild soap is hardly destructive. I do it myself. Not like he is using grinding paste on it.
If they were papered Goto, a different story. But all ok imho.

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Just some amplification to make a point.    I'm quite chill, if people are happy grinding an abrasive slurry on the surface of their pieces, they have my blessing.    The finer the finish/materials the more damage will be done, that's a fact.     This is dangerous counsel as we have no idea what a person reading this 'advice' may possess.    Over the years I have seen innumerable acts of vandalism perpetrated in the name of cleanliness.

 

-S-

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Thanks for the info. I gently cleaned them with a toothbrush and some gentle soap. I then got out some high magnification glasses and I noticed there is some red lacquer on certain parts of the menuki. Could that be original to the pieces?

 

Taylor, could you please show us the end result ?

 

I'm really interested in seeing the before / after because I saw some fittings on eBay and was thinking that a (soft) cleaning could really make a difference.

 

Cheers

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It would work quite well Ken.

They have smaller ones that use electric waves..cant for the life of me remember what its called.

 

Edit ultrasonic

 

Buys OC547-1 Ultrasonic Jewelry Cleaner

 

Description

Bulk Buys OC547-1 Ultrasonic Jewelry Cleaner

Features

 

Clean your fine jewelry at home without the use of any harsh chemicals with this ultrasonic jewelry cleaner

Simply use water and dish soap, that';s it! Ideal for jewelry, watches, coins, keys and more! Quickly removes dirt, dust and grime

Cleaner is fast and easy to use! Features an LED light indicator and suction cups on base for stability

Measures approximately 4 in. tall with a 5 in. diameter

Requires 4 ';AA'; batteries (not included)

Comes packaged in an individual box.

 

 

ADDITIONAL INFORMATION:

 

Brand: Bulk Buys

MPN: OC547-1

UPC:

Category: Jewelry, Fashion Jewelry, Fashion Bracelets,

SKU: KOLIM54363

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Yup, I've got one of those, too. My hobby used to be jewelry making, & my wife likes clean jewelry.  :glee:   Didn't suggest it for the menuki, as I have no idea what ultrasound might do to the patina, but I can't see how steam could do any harm.

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Yup, I've got one of those, too. My hobby used to be jewelry making, & my wife likes clean jewelry.  :glee:   Didn't suggest it for the menuki, as I have no idea what ultrasound might do to the patina, but I can't see how steam could do any harm.

Along with possible patina issues, they can loosen or dislodge fine inlays, overlays and laminations. Not recommended!

 

-S-

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Have you ran one or just your mastergoogling? I would image how high the vibration is set.

Maybe we should ask the "Master" instead of speculation. I know a soft bristle brush works just fine under slow stream of water to flush away grit.

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Anyone who has not had extensive experience should research what kind of things should (and how), or should not, be put into an ultrasonic cleaner.    There are MANY materials and circumstances that would counter indicate its use....if your uncertain don't do it.

 

-S-

p.s.- "Act in haste, repent at leisure"

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Ultrasound works great to break dirt & grime loose from jewelry, but my cheap ($100) unit only has one setting. I haven't ruined anything, so far, but I also don't put fragile stones like opal in the solution. Two minutes in the ultrasound, another minute blasting by steam, & things really sparkle.

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I would caution against using an ultrasonic cleaner if there's any chance that there is gold uttori present. Some examples I've worked with have had a rosin residue in between the substrate and the gold foil. It's as yet unclear to be what exactly its function was , more research required, but an ultrasonic session might weaken the bond or worse.

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Hi Brian

 

a soft clean brush and warm water/gentle soap will rarely be a problem. To be extra careful one could use an artists paintbrush, natural bristles, instead of a toothbrush. Boiling in distilled water is probably also ok for all metal pieces.

 

But perhaps we ought to suggest that if any member are in doubt they simply ask for advice here and we can do our best to advise on a case by case basis.

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Basically what I have been advocating all along.    Loose the toothbrush and use a natural bristle artists brush, if it has a metal ferrule tape it with electrical tape to prevent any mishaps.    Degreasing first by briefly soaking it in a solvent, such as  pure alcohol or benzene, will do away with most of the grit issues.     As mentioned, what is or isn't done depends on the particular situation.

 

-S-

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I did indeed and it won't, I also said basically.   If you read Ford's statement for what is actually says, instead of what you would like it to say, you'd see it aligns with mine.   Standard Museum conservation technique involves the lifting of surface dirt using solvents and various absorbent materials.....grit is a major concern.    If you disagree with my opinion, do as you see fit...scrub away.    We all must do what works for us.

 

-S-

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 If you read Ford's statement for what is actually says, instead of what you would like it to say, you'd see it aligns with mine.

 

I have just done that a number of times and don't see much of an alignment to be honest.  For example "boiling in distilled water" does not quite align with "briefly soaking it in a solvent, such as  pure alcohol or benzene".  Boil and soak are different processes, also boil is usually not a brief activity, unlike dip in boiling distilled water.  Also distilled water and pure alcohol / benzene are different solvents...

 

I don't disgaree or agree with your opinion, I am just trying to keep the record straight for the benefit of my own learning.  Sorry to be cantankerous and I will leave it at that.

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To clarify the record: Yes, the solvent addition is Mine, as is the reference to Museum conservation practices.    In prior posts, Ford has mentioned using solvents for cleaning.    If you don't wish to risk marring delicate gilded surfaces or fragile soft metal patinas this greatly minimizes the possibility.    This final redundancy should assure the horses death, if only by boredom......let's move on to more productive content.

 

-S-

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