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jeremy

Blade repair

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Hi guys,

 

Ive just purchased a koto blade which needs to be straightened. It has a kink or a twist in the middle of the blade, seems like it has been bent in the past, and someone has straightened and created a kink in the blade. It isnt all that bad, it still fits in the saya properly, but who can I send my blade to, to get it fully straightened, without having to send it to Japan?

 

Thanks,

 

Jeremy Hagop

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that and a good togi can do it. if it has a real kink i dobut it can be fixed...got pix to the extent of the kink??

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Thanks for the advice fellas. Even with a good quality camera it would be hard to take a good picture depicting the kink, as it is barely noticeable. Does it sound like a serious issue, or could it just be left alone? Do you know anyone who you can refer me to specifically that can fix this problem. I am located in Australia, just for your information.

 

Kind regards,

 

Jeremy Hagop

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Hi Jeremy,

 

At least 4 of my out of polish blades have a slight bend or kink in them. I don't let it get to me too much, as oneday when I can afford to send them for polish, I am sure they will be straightened. I wouldn't dare try it myself, as I am scared of hagire.

I don't think there is anyone in Oz that I would recommened. Straightening is a job for a serious professional as the pitfalls are fatal (for the blade)

 

Brian

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Hi Brian,

 

Thanks for the information. Is there anyone in the U.S or anywhere else besides Japan and Australia, that i could send my blade to to straighten it, without having to get it polished? Also,hypothetically speaking, would a kink in the blade such as this one affect the cutting ability of the sword? Would a samurai have used a blade with a slight kink in it for cutting?

 

Thanks,

 

Jeremy Hagop

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Jeremy,

 

I don't think the samurai would use swords for "cutting" as such. Remember they were weapons, and used for battle and to protect themselves. I guess during a campaign they would use the sword in whatever condition it was, but I expect they would have had it repaired as soon as feasible.

A bend in a sword will restrict it's ability to cut as the geometry is off, and it would likely bend further.

Btw..I expect any of the polishers on the links page (Moses, Bob Benson etc) would all be able to sort out a bend.

 

Brian

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Guest reinhard

Once steel texture is stretched on one side by bending an object, it is impossible to bring it back to its former shape mechanically. This is just physics. Straightening the sword will only result in stretching/changing the blade on the other side too. From a warrior's point of view this is fatal, for the sword will have a weak area, which will break easily in the future. From a more peaceful point of view the reshaping of a bent art-sword is O.K.. One of the most outstanding Nihon-To in existence, the famous "Dai-Hannya NAGAMITSU", had been severly bent during an earthquake and was straightened again afterwards. Traces of this repair are still visible but its supreme quality and historical value make them negligeable.

 

reinhard

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hi jeremy,

 

i am a fellow aussie and let me assure you there is currently no one in oz qualified to work on your blade, steer clear of anyone in oz who says they can straighten it for you, it will most likely result in more damage.

 

if you are totally against sending it to Japan, i would suggest takeo seki in canada, he has served an apprenticeship under a master polisher in Japan. or there's bob benson and jimmy hayashi in the US.

 

however, the US or canada is a long way to send a blade to a polisher only for it to be straightened and not polished... if it needs a polish might as well kill two birds with one stone.

 

just make sure you send it to a pro and you will be fine.

 

good luck, take it easy.

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A friend once told me he watched a Japanese polisher repair a bend using a blowtorch and a hammer. :lol:
A friend once told me saw the face of Elvis on the belly of a lobster. :crazy:

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A friend once told me saw the face of Elvis on the belly of a lobster

He coulda made a fortune selling it on eBay.

.

.

.

.

Brian

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On serious bends the only way to correct them is with mild heating.

 

The last sword I had with a small bend (a Sukesada Wakizashi) got a very tiny hagire after it was polished. It was almost invisible to the naked eye and you could only see it with a microscope or glass. :(

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had a old vet tell me one time how outraged he was that a Japanese fellow looked at his sword, put it flat on the table a bend here and a bend there and handed back to the ol guy....he was ranting how could he do that until i told him the guy just took a bend out of your blade. :rotfl:

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Andy is much more qualified than me to comment on Magari-Togi, but from what I've heard, the most heat a blade is exposed to is boiling water, and that only if the temperature is very low, before putting it into the Noshi-bô / Tamegi, or straightening device. Hammering the Shinogiji is a last resort; using a blowtorch might get rid of the bend, but also of the Hamon ... :(

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Yep..I expect the blowtorch (if it is ever used, and I doubt that too) would only be used on a very fast pass or 2 just to get a minimum of heat like the boiling water.

There is also the copper blocks method that withdraws the heat. But the true way is the wooden blocks that Guido mentioned, and a very keen eye.

However it is all a moot point anyways...as we are not going to try it ourselves, and will leave it to the experts. This is like most of that Jackass movie stuff....don't try this at home folks. ;)

Perhaps Andrew our apprentice togishi will comment if he sees the thread (or Mr Pedersen?)

 

Brian

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I have seen quite severe bends and kinks be corrected using only tamegi, no heat source required. Though using boiling water in addition to a straightening device is fairly common I believe... never heard of a blowtorch being used, sounds kinda risky!!!!

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I had a katana bend correction done at the Chicago show ( Mr. Chris Bowen's )............ it's is very scary to watch esp. it's your sword.

I do not recomend it ( just like all fathers should stay out of the delivery room during C-section )

 

p.s. no heat used, just a wood block

milt

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Since i was asked so very nicely :D , i might give my view on this...

Fixing a blade that is bent, is not something that polishers like to do...we do it anyway though ;)

Many times, you have to not only "fix" the bent spot, but also the area above and below it, in order to correct it completely.

Also, every sword is different, some will bend back very easily, others have what we call "koshi"

(springlike) and they take a lot of effort to correct.

 

It may look quite easy when you see a professional do it.. but believe me, it is not!

Don't try to do it yourself...worst case you can break it!

If it is not a lot, then don't worry too much.

 

Regards,

Brian

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Thank you Brian and Andrew for your insight, much appreciated :)

As expected and suggested, this isn't a job for anyone that isn't well trained. A lot of what looks like a simple bend is actually much more complicated including kinks or twisting. I am glad I don't have to be the one to do it, must be pretty nerve-wracking. A correction in a slightly wrong place, and you have another problem to deal with. I expect when a bend has occurred that the steel might be a bit work hardened there, and resist bending back in exactly the right place?

 

Brian

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