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Hagire Question


Ilovekatanas
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A hagire is a fatal flaw that can not be repaired because it compromises the integrity of the blade. There are also probably good metallurgical reasons for this given the location of this flaw, but I’ll leave that to members with more expertise in that area.

 

They can be difficult to see and sometimes are (unscrupulously) hidden, but they are not something that can be fixed.

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A hagire is a fatal flaw that can not be repaired because it compromises the integrity of the blade. There are also probably good metallurgical reasons for this given the location of this flaw, but I’ll leave that to members with more expertise in that area.

 

They can be difficult to see and sometimes are (unscrupulously) hidden, but they are not something that can be fixed.

Then I hope what I think is one on my sword isn't.
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Over the years this issues has been discussed and the established wisdom has always been that hagiri can't be fixed. Certainly they should always  be looked for and avoided.

Still, a couple of year back, after a trip to the Token Dai-ichi, friend reported that hagiri WERE being repaired. I am not sure that technique this involved. Given the abundance of high quality blades I frankly can't understand why this would be worth doing, but this story is "out there."

Peter

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Anything can be "repaired," Peter, but I'm sure that a hagire would still compromise the blade's integrity, by definition. What do you do in the middle of a battle when your blade breaks? Go, OOPS?

 

From a collector's point of view, a hagire pretty well negates any value.

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Guest Rayhan

This depends on how far the Hagire extends into the hamon. If the Hagire is not yet passed the hamon and into the ji towards the shinogi a good polisher can polish down the entire edge and save the sentiment of the sword but you would have to be willing to accept that the sword is a much thinner version of its former self and now best as an heirloom rather than a collectable. If it extends into the shinogi then the sword is no longer worth saving and one should consider its provenance and age to justify itvas a collectable.

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From technical point of view it is possible and it would not break. You can weld with modern laser micro welding (a Japanese technology) things around 10my. You will see nothing with your eyes.

 

These two pieces are fixed together.

post-3496-0-42035800-1528354591_thumb.jpg

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There are a lot of companys in the internet they can do it. Ask for. 

The equipment costs from 15.000 EUR up to 100.000 EUR. So i think 100,- EUR / h is a start price.

 

This is a very young technology. You must find one who has some experience.

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It seems Nihonto are held to the same high standards today as they were 500 years ago when the Samurai's life absolutely depended on the swords integrity. Particularly Hagire, I wouldn't suggest the use of older Nihonto for anything beyond simply admiring it as a archaeological artifact. 

 

I often read of Hagire rendering the sword as being little or no value. (FATAL)  Are we still judging the value of Nihonto on it's ability to be pressed in to service at a moments notice??

 

Is a known Masumune with a fatal Hagire of no value...

 

Please, I'm not trying to anger anyone, I'm seriously curious?

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A fatal flaw does not transform a good sword to a bad one. It makes the sword damage. I bet you can fight long decades battles over battles and the sword will not break with hagire. It depends on the crack. A hagire that not run out of the hamon could be end in a chip. And a sword with a chip is a polishing candidate. Thats my little thoughts. Judge every crack individuell.

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I have a Wakizashi in nice koshirae with two hagire but it is still in my collection. 

 

Worth very little money - Yes

 

Does the hagire make it a bad sword - No, as I have a good idea as to how the hagire happened.

 

It was purchased with the Mune almost flat from hammer blows, Probably used to split logs so it was always a risk. So it's failure was due to missuse.

 

Would I purchase/take a risk on another - No

 

Mark C

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'Hagire' is accepted in sword terminology as a 'crack in the hamon' (fatal flaw).

If it is repairable, then its not a hagire, its a repairable fault.

So would identify with many others found in blades.

 

Repair a recognised hagire! Why????

 

No one walks away from a 'fatal' fall!

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I have seen attempts of 'repairing' HAGIRE without the latest technological means (like micro Laser welding). As the temperatures for welding are above 2.500°C, any original hardening effects in the HAMON are locally erased and cannot be restored. Depending on the heat source, the affected areas may differ in size, but even micro-welding will have obvious effects. If technically well done and with a perfect surface, a TOGISHI might be able to disguise the relevant spot with KESHO techniques to an extent, but for an expert the 'repair' will remain visible. 

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The 'purist' will not contemplate  hagire in a blade, it detracts from perfect. 

 

A blade with hagire although having everything else a collector desires, will not demand the same high price. (but still has a value).

The fear of a nihonto blade failing due to hagire, is NOT a consideration, it is not possessed for use.

So any attempt to repair, or hide hagire in an art blade, can only be a reason to deceive.

 

The formation and beauty of the hamon, is a result of temperature control, and is as Jean points out.

Welding heat in such a small area will destroy the hamon.

So a partnership between the welder and a Togishi, will be required to effect a repair, that will not pass exam. Hmmmm?

 

On a personal note; a young student I met, wanted to join the nihonto fraternity, there was a wakizashi that showed a hagire in koshirae.

I carefully explained this to him, and as the purchase price was reachable, he was delighted, and to him it is still a prized possession.

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If the crack not run out of the hamon it is not hagire.

 

The length of any crack does not alter its description of 'hagire. 

Any crack, that runs at right angle from the ha towards the hamon, is a hagire.

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I think he means if it does not go all the way through the hamon, it is not fatal.
But if it is say only 1mm long, with plenty of ha left, is it a hagire? We are taught hagire are fatal. A crack that is small could be ground out. Ugly, but not fatal. So is a hagire a crack that goes all the way through the hamon?

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