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Fresh From The Post Office - New Addition

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Just received this Yasutsugo. The estimation paper mentions that this is the 12th generation but researching this line of smiths, I saw an article that the last generation (9th) retired in 1879. Trying to see if I can find more information. Came with Hozon origami.

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Congrats on the purchase,  it looks like a fine blade!   It looks to be a osuriage sword so I would hazard a guess it is much older than you are thinking.via your papers.   It's getting late  I'll read the pro's opinions tomorrow.   Nite nite

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Well, it is not worth anything to bother. Okay, it's hihonto. But not interesting. Yasutsugu ended 11 generations. And interesting are basically just the first 3. I think it's 8 generations. (it looks like Tsuruta does not have time to research  :doh:  )

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Dear Bob.

 

I assume your response was a late night call as the sword has a mei, well finished nakago and papers then o suriage is out surely?

 

Simon is indeed fortunate that he is able to collect at a level that allows him to dismiss such a sword as of no interest.  If I had been able to buy it I would be very happy.

 

Ben, I'm afraid I can't answer your question off hand but I'm sure others will.  I think it's a nice thing to have and I hope you enjoy both your sword and the research.  As a general rule where many generations of a swordsmith's name exist the detail gets a little fuzzy towards the later ones.  It is not unusual to find conflicting evidence 

.

 

All the best.

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Hi Ben,

 

If you take Simon's comments to heart and really decide that it is of no interest, then I'll gladly re-home it for you. 

 

I'm assuming the origami doesn't mention a generation. Does Tsuruta san mention a date/ nengo period as that might give a clue as to the generation.

 

Best,

John

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12th generation is listed at working c. from late 1860's up onwards on Meiji period. I was going to ask same as John above, if the indication for 12th is on NBTHK paper or in Aoi description?

 

Just to note about the confusions, I read from Seskos that the family split to Echizen & Edo branchs, other has 12 generations listed and other 9. That may explain some of the confusion.

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Nice blade, nice fittings. Well bought! 

 

Congrats James

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I was rushing out last night. Should have posted this as well. The 12th generation attribution came from Tsuruta-San and not from the origami. Thanks so much for the leads and analysis guys. I was just confused on the differing generations of who the last smith of the line was. Thanks Jussi for making that differentiation between the two different branches. 

 

I was admiring the blade but here's the second part that I find enjoyable, the research. I'm going to try to go to the NCJSC library at Krausewerks sometime today.

My books are few and fairly solid for a beginner but I think this research is beyond my meager collection. Hopefully,  there's more information in the club's library.

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I guess this side is 慶応元年八月日 - 1st year of Keiō (1865) a day in 8th month

八木性依頼造之 - Yagi (a place) (shō/sei?) Irai tsukuru kore - I don't really understand this my guess is made in Yagi at commission?

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Special order for Yagi. August, Keio Gannen.

 

When the Nidai Yasutsugu passed away there were two prospective candidates for the heirship, the Nidai's younger brother (third son of the shodai) and the Nidai's son, though his son was just a child.  Through negotiations it was decided that the school would be split into two branches, Edo and Echizen.  It was decided the Nidais son Umenosuke, would become the Edo Sandai and the nidai's younger brother Shirouemon would become the Echizen Sandai.

 

The Edo line ended with the kyudai or 9th where the Echizen line remained until the Juichidai.

 

I have never seen an 12th generation Yasutsugu.  There is no such mention or oshigata example found in the Yasutsugu Taikan, that I can find.

 

I was told that the 12th lived in Musashi and was called Shimosaka Ichinojyo at Hogo Horikawa, and that his early name was Yasunao.  So was this a true descendent of the lineage?  Looking at the provided mei, it looks very poorly cut for Yasutsugu, but I have nothing to compare it too, and if the NBTHK issued papers, then I suppose who am I to argue.

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